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Full text of "Torontonensis, 1918"



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The Blue and White 



Old Toronto, Mother ever dear, 
All tin sons tliv very name revere, 
Yes, we hail thee, ne'er will fail thee. 
But will seek thy glory with our might. 
( Yes we are) ever loyal, faithful, frank 
We will sound thy praises in our song, 
Aye, and cheer both loud and long, 
Tile l\o\ al I 'due and White. 



-tr< mi 



Soon our college days will all be past, 
Duty bids us part from friends at last. 
But we'll sewer, trusting ever, 
Love for Varsity may us unite (unite us). 
Then we'll serve the Mother of us all. 
And the merry days of youth recall, 
While, whatever may befall. 
We'll flaunt the Blue and White. 



IT< >n niti i is i >ur University, 

Shout, oh shout, men of every faculty, 

Velut arbor aevo, 

-May she ever thrive. Oh! 
God, forever bless our Alma Mater. 





TOROMTOMEMSIS 

THE TEAR BOOK of THE GRADUATES 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

Published by the Students Administrative Council 




VOLUME XX. 

1915 



[ Applied Science Medicine 

[St. Michael's Pharmacy) 

» I Trinity Social Service 

j. BACON BRODIE, * j&t^ty Q Theolo JvSria COLLIER C. GRANT, BA. 

Editor-in-Chief. Dentistry (.Wycliffe | Business Manager. 

Forestry Veterinary^ 



,v 



CONTENTS 



Colleges, Faculties and Their Societies : 




University College . . . . 


11 


Victoria College .... 


47 


Trinity and St. Hilda's 


69 


St. Michael's College . 


79 


Faculty of Medicine 


87 


Faculty of Applied Science . 


107 


College of Dental Surgeons 


123 


Faculty of Forestry 


133 


College of Pharmacy 


137 


Veterinary College 


151 


Faculties of Theology: 




Trinity College .... 


164 


Victoria College .... 


165 


Wycliffe College .... 


167 


Social Service ..... 


71, 172 



Fraternities ...... 187 

Frontispiece ...... 1 

In Memoriam . . 49, 7 1 , 109, 135 

Intercollegiate Debating Union Executive . 177 

Knowlton Conference and Environs . 10 

Menorah Society .... 184, 185 

President's Message .... 6 

Sororities . . . . . . 191 

Students Administrative Council . . 176 

Torontonensis Board . . . . 8, 9 

Toronto Newman Club . . . 182, 183 

University of Toronto Activities . . 173 

Women Students' Council . . 174 

Valedictory ...... 7 

"Varsity" Staff 178 

Y. M. C. A. Federal Executive . . 179 



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1 H, many are trie things tkat are out in the years : 

There are visions of joy, bright hopes and dark fears, 
There are prophecies made which the future must hold 
To sw^ift, sure fulfilment, in measure untold. 
There are gleamings of smiles and cloud mists of tears, 
There are beautiful things far out in the years. 

"There are beautiful things far out in the ^ears, 
There is light which the gloom of the present endears, 
There are thoughts wnich the future to good deeds may change, 
There is happiness there so blissful and strange. 
Though the present for us hold but trials and tears, 
There are beautiful things far out in the years." 



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December 31st, iqij. 




TEAR ago we Were hoping mat 
v?Ken me next Commencement Day 
arrived, We should be able to look 
back upon victor? ana be setting our- 
selves to fne tasks of peace ; but I must 
again, and now for fne fourfn time, 
address those who will graduate in May under fhe 
cloud of War. Indeed mere are some among you 
who are completing fneir courses after having been 
on active service at fne front, soldier-students whom 
We ha\)e welcomed home, and whose service, along 
wifh mat of our ofher men who have gone forfh to 
fhis war, has brought distinction to fneir University^. 
In one way or another you have all, I believe, 
received a new and higher learning than your pre- 
decessors in the sense that your education has been 
won in a new and keener atmosphere created bj) a 
purifying idea. I am confident that you Will use 
what the Uni\)ersit^ has given you at this time of 
unsurpassed sacrifice in the spirit of those of our 
graduates and your own fellow-students who have 
served their country and our imperishable cause at 
the most exacting cost to themselves ; and that as in 
War abroad so in peace when it comes at home you 
will abundantly pro^e the worth of $our training. 



President. 





VALEDICTORY 



At the moment of parting", as perhaps at no other time, comes 
the impulse to "look before and after, and pine for what is not." 
And when, as now. the parting is of friends who for long have 
lived together, worked together, played together, but who now 
are to be scattered, like seeds in autumn that take root in distant 
fields ; when the parting means farewell to an institution whose 
spirit lias pervaded and shaped an epoch of our lives — perhaps at 
such a time we may he pardoned if we pause, as on the threshold, 
for one last view of familiar scenes, for a moment's reflection on 
the associations and friendships and influences that we are 
leaving. 

hour years ago we gathered here, with our dreams, our 
ambitions and ideals. Those were the days when Fancy, lightly 
Hitting to the far-off time of graduation, painted in radiant 
colours the "careers" that would then await us. Now we find 
tlie^e things have changed, even as we have changed; and there 
may be a smile of amusement, or a pang of regret, as we remem- 
ber what we were to have been. Coming in search of education, 
we may have expected some magical transport to the things 
most desired; or some instrument of knowledge or skill that 
would mean certain achievement of the goal we then sought. 
But instead we have found that we shall always be students, 
that education is a slower process, a process of growth, of devel- 



opment, that should not, that must not end before the close of life 
itself. Many, too. have found besides a deeper, nobler meaning, 
have learned that the end of education is character, and the test 
of character is service. And they have gone, have thrown aside 
the old ambitions, broken away from the accustomed life, gone 
to seek the fields of greatest service. Some were destined not to 
leave those fields; main- still carry on, will do so to the end; and 
some have returned, joining with us on this, our day of gradu- 
ation. 

As we pause here on the threshold, for a backward glance 
down the way we have come, we see many things that we might 
wish were different. Perhaps we have not been true to the best 
that is in us, perhaps we regret that we cannot recall to live over 
again the years just gone by. But it is with an abiding sense of 
the privileges that we have enjoyed, and of the debt that we 
have incurred to others less fortunate, that we bid farewell to 
Toronto. As we step forward to work our way in the far-scattered 
tasks that await us, the spirit of our University through Four 
years of war. and the conduct of the noblest of her sons, shall 
he to us a gleam of inspiration, a beacon light to guide us to 
the things worth while. 

\\ . R. SALTKk'. 




TOKONTONF.NSIS HOARD 



TOP ROW — R. N. I.; A. B. Holmes, Medicine; H W. Dickinson, Wycliffe; W. S. Watson, Trinity; D. M. I,ow, Medicine; R. F. 

Mclennan, University College ; J. T. McCosh, Medicine. 
MIDDLE ROW — R. W. Frid, Victoria ; E. M. Eckert, Veterinary ; F,. W. Mcleod, Applied Science ; Miss H. Best, University College; 

Miss M. A. Bnlmer, Medicine ; D. H. Blatchford, Victoria ; M. B. Flannery, St. Michael's ; J. V. Bradshaw, Pharmacy. 
BOTTOM ROW— W. F. Gregory, University College; Miss M. I«yon, University College; Collier C. Grant. B.A., Bus. Man.; J. Bacon 

Brodie, Editor-in-Chief ; Miss Bell, Medicine: C. W. Hancock, Applied Science: Miss H. Sparling, Victoria. 



TORONTONENSIS, 1918 



After months of patient endeavour, the twentieth volume of 
Torontonensis is published. Students who are familiar with the 
pages of preceding Near Hooks, will note the many changes; and 
it is hoped that these will meet with their approval. To those 
who have Keen actively associated in the work connected with 
the assembling of the material of this volume the editor 
expresses his deepest appreciation. 

The purpose of this hook is to record in picture and biography 
the characteristics of the individual members of the graduating 
year, and in write-up and engraving to tell the story of the many 
activities which compose college life. This volume contains the 
historv of the Class of 1T8, which entered this University in the 
Fall of l'»14. shortly after the outbreak of war. Not a few of its 
original members have fallen on the fields of battle: many are 
^till on active service; some have returned; and we. who form 
the remainder, having spent four of the most momentous years 
in the world's historv in preparing to live, now go forth from 
the halls of our Alma Mater. Mow many are watchinsr to see 



what we shall do in answer to the ringing appeal for women and 
men. to bring trained minds, broad sympathies and world-wide 
vision to the task <>t winning the war, that men may continue to 
live; hut who. now and alter the war. will endeavour, not only 
to make the "World sale for Menu >cracy," hut will make "Democ 
racy saving for the World"? 

We may not now attach any significant value to this volume; 
hut our thoughts in regard to this matter will change. In the 
future, though separated by long stretches of distance from our 
University, will not a glance through the pages of this hook 
bring us hack in thought to the years we spent among familiar 
scenes; renew remembrances of many happy friendships; re- 
kindle visions of the days that were to be? As we linger in such 
reminiscence — as we shall love to do — shall we not with the 
Rt. lion. 1!. II. Asquith see that the greatest gift which any 
University can bestow is "the company of great thoughts; the 
inspiration of great ideals; the example of great achievements; 
and the consolation of great failures"? 

EDITOR-IN-CHIKb. 




KtfoWurotf, Quebec, cTiwe. 1917. 



» 



10 



To the Graduating Class of University College 



By P 



nncipa 



1 Hu 



tton 




The class of 1918 is the 
firsl that has graduated with 
no University experience 
previous to the experience of 
war; il is a momentous 
change: whether for better 
or worse who shall say? but 
obviously for both the better 
and worse in main" ways. 
The men and women of 1918 
have seen the greatest move- 
ment which has ever stirred 
the soul of Canada with a 
sense of its place in the 
world, and still more with a 
sense of the unity of that 
Empire of which it now 
forms a much more promi- 
nent part : they have seen a 
catastrophe which on the 
face of it ought to have uni- 
fied Canada itself more than 
anything which has ever hap- 
pened: a great war binding 
together with blood and iron 
the two great races from 
which Canada springs: the 
ter nope, the most brilliant promise Canada has drawn from 
the cards of destiny has been defeated up to the present by 
causes — some accidental and arising from the blunders of poli- 
ticians, and some still very obscure and buried from view in that 
strange French-Canadian mind which is the onlv "American" 



Principal Hutton 



lath 



mind now left in America: the only mind which clings to that 
American doctrine of isolation which America itself has now 
finally renounced. It is possible that before these words are 
finally in print Sir Wilfrid may have brought round his country- 
men of Quebec to broader views of their place in Canada and of 
the place of Canada in the world; but at present, in the last days 
of the year I'M", this is onlv a hope, and even a faint hope. Even 
so. the class of 1918 have lived out their University course in 
great days, full of inspiration as well as full of tragedy: they 
have seen their comrades going to the front to the number of 
over one thousand from this college; of that thousand it is 
already known before the end of I'M 7 that one hundred will 
newer return; that number wdl be increased before these words 
are read. These memories of the war. with their mingled exal- 
tation and regret, are the assets of this class: on the other side 
of the balance is the diminished vitality of all University life; it 
is not merely that the best of our men are gone — that is a small 
part of the loss in energy and interest; in addition to that our 
thoughts are turned from their natural channel; we think and 
talk only of the war. All the normal activities of the University 
are depressed ; athletics are rigidly circumscribed by the absence 
of the best athletes; dances and social functions have disap- 
peared; the Literary and Scientific Society is in suspended ani- 
mation ; the old "faculty" rivalries, with the diminution in the 
numbers of each faculty, have faded away; and finally there is 
something which appeals most of all to a professor, though less 
no doubt to students: the intellectual keenness of the air is gone. 
The end is not vet: the class of 1918 passes out of academic 
life as thousands of Canadians have passed out of mortal lite. 
hoping to live to see the end of the war and the passing of 
German frightfulness, and not seeing them. 



12 



W^ammm 



ARMOUR. ELIZABETH F. 

"A woman of independent mind." 

Matriculating from Campbellford High 
School, Bess entered Varsity with Class '18 
Her sincerity lias won for her here many 
warm friends; and her staunch independence 
points to a very successful future. 



ARNEDT. NORMA S. 



With pe 



"Lavishly endowed 
>iuil gifts and bright instinctive wit. 



Hamiltonian "Mamie" — Moderns aspirant 
for three years prophesying in her third — 
generalizing in her fourth specializing in 
skating, dancing, and chasing wee, sleekit, 
cow'rin', tim'rous beasties at 2 a.m. 



BECKETT, HOLLIS E. BEST. I. HILDA 

"He loved a smoke, he loved a joke, "When sweet sixteen from the sen she nunc, 

and friends to call around." Where the mist makes colour bright." 

Scarboro greeted him in June, 1896. Mark- Hilda came fresh from the ocean breezes 

ham and Malvern prepared him for Varsity, of Maine. She has been consistent in general- 

The finished product of U. C. now seeks legal izing, not only in class-work, hut in societies, 

enlightenment. A confirmed optimist despite and friendships. Hilda's varied interests have 

frequent "blowouts." kept her much on the rush, ami she has been 

a willing worker on executives each year. 



jmmm?mmMim^: 






BLACK, LILLIAN M. 



Quelle fait 
in it re." 

I.iliian ha 
eventfully in 
hi' remarkabl 
far afield in 



. Une 
concurr 



si pure 

in rnissean qui 



■ hitherto passed her days un- 
tile city of lur birth, hut a voice 
power and beauty will carry her 
the future. 



BLANCHARD. MARIE C. 

. . . . For to knoze her better 
Js but to lure her more." 

Marie comes from Belleville, entering Var- 
sity in Moderns. With a keen sense of 
humor and a capacity of enjoying life in- 
tensely, she has developed her social as well 
as her intellectual powers. She is a true 
friend What more mid we say 3 



BOLE. CECIL L 

wh 



"Now 

Ten 



shall arbitrate' 
love what I hate. 



Educated at Orillia Collegiate and Peterboro 

Normal. Three years in rural teaching deter- 
mined his vocation. At Varsity has revealed 
1 ili Mi >s. iphic insight, line sensibilities and a 
devotion for music, literature and art Moi e 
at home in the studv than in the world. 



BOLE. J. SHERIDAN 

"Mine be some figured flame which blends, 
transcends them all." 

In 189/ Sheridan was planted in Woodville. 
Before branching into Philosophy at U. C. in 
1914 lie sapped some elements of learning at 
Cannington. A poet by birth : a sophist by 
nature Interests : Tennis ami The Arts. 



13 










IHIiHll 



BOLES. JAMES A. 

/ man o) 

ance. 

I . , r - sing tin song 
Should old friend; 

Foi friendship cann 
Though time may 



sympathy honoui and 

of An 'I I ..111- Syne, 
. be forgot? 
.a change with time, 
hange oui lol 



BOLTON, ALICE J. 

"Laughs at impossibilities 

. tnd i 1 1,-> it shall be done." 

Whatever Alice does, she dors with all her 
heart. Perhaps this is the secret of the 
success that has attended her at Riverdale, at 
V. H. Sc. and in her many other activities. 
Whatever field of work she enters, teaching, 
dietetics, or the gentle art of home-making, 
<\ i are sure she \\ ill do well. 



BOYD, LORNE T. 

"The end justifies the means" 

Coming via unknown lands from Langton, 
Ont., Lome got off at Varsity September, 

'14, and entered M. & P. During his fur- 
lough here lie lias not confined his attention 
exclusively to the male inmates. Fellow and 
co-ed. grads. wish him every success in teach- 
ing the youth the paths of rectitude. 



BOYLE. AGNES W. 

"Happiness is not to be prescribed but 
ted." 

Born at Richmond II ill. and having matricu- 
lated from Harbord, Agnes enrolled 
General Student Through a genial personality 
and the sunniest of smiles, she leaves out 
Alma Mater a General Favorite. 




BRISSON. ALBERTINE 

"With them the seed oj wisdom did I sow 

. ,;/, mine . ought to make ii 

Mbcrtine, aftei graduating from Ridgetown 

i | , i,n,i, i,r less regularly infested fjni 
v , i sity < olli gi in si .ii .Ii "i lighl on the 
subject ..i Modern History, supplementing 
tlii- with a course on the astronomy of 

mot picture stars. Favorite literature, 

I in \ , l,,|,, ,|ia P.rilannica 



BRODIE, .1. BACON 

"The little thai is dc 
rec look forward and : 
yet tn do." 

Enrolled in Philosophy. 

speaking and blushing. 
cere and eai nest even ii 
not to iii.ii i Foi five yea 



seems 
how 



nothing 

ii neh we 



when 
have 



Addicted to public 

Always frank, sin- 

liis determination 



BROWN. CLARA ADELE 

"./// that's best of dark and light 
Meet in her aspect and her eyes/' 

Adele hails from Humberside C. I., Toronto. 
She entered II. & P., ITS. Her brighl and 
cheerful disposition makes her eminentlj fitted 
for her chosen medical career. Good luck lo 
our future doctor ! 



BROWN, LAURA H. 

"She was m v friend, fa 

From Hamilton I. .m 
Hall and Varsity, enti i 
pitable hostess, a party 
all Inn tea, her charac 
men! " You km >\\ wli 



thful and jiisi In me." 

>.i came to Queen's 
ing General. A hos- 

goer and partaker of 
ter requires no eoni- 
ai 1 mean." 



14 







BRUCE. GLADYS M. 

'Tis the mind that shines in every grace 
And chiefly in her roguish e'en." 

From Collingwood came Gladys with her 
high ideals and her love of mischief. Three 
weaknesses has she — afternoon teas, French 
and still more French. 



BUCK. MARJORIE 

"A maiden modest yet self-poss 



■d." 



From Port Rowan Marjorie's guiding-star 
led her first to Havergal and tlien to Varsity, 
where it shed its broad rays upon Moderns 
and Music. She took a great interest in 
College Activities, specializing in executives 
in '18. Chief characteristic — punctuality? 



CALE. OLIVE B. 

"1 wonder yen will 
Nobody murks yen. 



,7/7/ be talking; 



E. & H. (CI )— General, 2 stars— M 
Hist. — so varied a career naturally entai 
"words" with those "in loco parentis." Th 
experiences cultivated a natural talent 
constructive analysis and prepared her 
the subsequent office of Critic of the Lit 



od. 
led 
ese 
for 
for 



CHAMBERS. 

"Gentle of 

I. ora hails 
1X8 class. G 
tion, good st 
with virtues 
knowledge so 



LORA B. 

speech, benefit enl 

from Woodstock, 
eneral Course i! 
udent. Few hear 
warmed. Few 
infi iriiied. 



of mind." 

Entered the 
right disposi- 
ts like hers. 

li ;ii I-, with 



mrn^ 







CHILD. MABEL C. 

"./ heart to plan, a head to contrive 

and a hand lo execute." 

a I ii - lability) 4 . 

= Mathematics f Gym. 2 f Dramatic :i . 
14-18 - \v. r. A. 1 

nil i= 'I'lie gladsome heart of a child. 



COOK. CLARENCE C. 

''Now is the time lo laugh." 

Little is known of the juvenile career of 
this colloquial wit artist. Right from the 
plough handles at Streetsville, "Cap" blazed 
into Oakwood C. I. and thence to M. & P. in 
U. C. 1914. He leaves us hoping that his 
scientific training may help to set this world 
aright. 



COOPER. MARGUERITE 

"Sweet records, promises as sweet." 

From St. Thomas to English and History, 
From a little Freshie to Vice-President of the 

Lit 
From a pink-cheeked innocent to a 15. A. 



CORRIGAN. MARY J. 
"When Irish Eyes .-In 



Smiling 



Mary Corrigan left her childhood home 
in Wilkes Barre, Pa., for the halls academic 
and Queen'-, of Varsity. Her favorite indoor 
-ports are "ref-ling," afternoon teas and 
dancing. Name, accent ami appearance sug- 
gest her ancestry. 



15 






^mmmmMMm&K 



COWAN. D. ARCHIBALD 
I 'Ac' vanquished, he could argue 

Archie greeted Ihe world witli his charac- 
teristic smile and murmured "Me fiom Bluce, 

too," at Chesley, Ont., in 1892. T nto wel 

coined him in 1907 The University mis- 
nomcd him Arts '18. Ill-- jovial sincerity and 
stories hav< gained him many friends. ( a \ 
on Knox Collegi 



DALLEY, MARY A. 



"For she's a toll} good felloi 
And hi 'bod v i an deny." 



Mar 



came from Jarvis Collegiate, indulg- 
ing in her spare time in General ( ourse 
Sympathetic, genial, with a host of friends, sin- 
lias held office in various capacities. A de- 
lightful contralto voice has made her very 
popular at College functions. Good luck 
to lur. say we. 



DEY. MARY H. 

"A noble type of good heroii Womanhood." 

Borne in .Moose Creek, received her ele- 
mentary education at Cornwall High School 
and Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby; entered 
Varsity in '14. where she has won many 
friends by her kindliness and sympathy. 



DIGNUM. DORIS V. 



Trust her 



she is fooling the 



Doris Valentine Dignum, coming font 
Westbourne School, registered in Arts, 1911. 
A breakdown necessitated her leaving College 
1914, and .aftei some tim spent in England 

she returned to join the class of ITS. 









EISEN. SOLOMON 



< n thei 



rits modest men 



■ dumb." 
-Colman. 

Born 1898. Matric 1913. Entered Varsitj 
with class 1918. where he spent his ti in ex- 
the ih I n ous i egions 61 philosoph v. 
obtaining honors throughout his coursi He 
has taken a keen interest in every branch of 
student activity. ('. ( ). T. ('. '14-'16; local 
editor of Varsity; Philosophical Club; o gan 
eneral • tarj of Menoi ah : 



ELLIOTT. GLADYS E. 

She loved her own sweet way : sh 
To sleep, and eke to dream : 
She loved all things artistic, and 
She 1. 1\ ed lt< i tea wit h c ream ; 
She loved to wear a thoughtful air, 
l\\ es cool and bi i »w serene ; 
But most of all she h.\ ed to do 
The wholly unforeseen 



FERGUSON, M. GRACE 

loved "A Little Lovely Maul. Most Dear and Taking " 

Fun-loving and care-free, but withal a loyal 
friend. Grace entered College Halls in 1914; 
General Course claimed her. but she found 
time for College Activities; being Anglican 
Rep., and efficient secretary Athletic Associa- 
tion 'is. 



FLETCHER MARY E. 

"./ friend ii gold, if true, he'll never leave 
thee." 

Matriculating from Barrie Collegiate. Mary 
entered General Course. Genial, sympathetic, 
and possessed with a sterling sense of honor. 
Fhi soon gamed many friends. "The best 
possible" is the I enediction of '1 8. 



lb' 






FLETT. FLORENCE E. 

"The only rose without thorns is friendship." 

Budded in Toronto, cultivated at St. Mar- 
garet's, came to Varsity to bloom, justified 
her claim a* a (hornless rose by her genuine 
friendship- -truly her fragrance will ever linger 
with the members of '18. 



FORD, NORMA H. C. 
"Slight is the subjei i. but 



Matriculated from I'arkdale Collegiate with 
First Edward Blake Scholarship in Science. 
Specialized in Biology, winning First Fulton 
Scholarship in 1915. 
W. U. A. and Vice-] 
Club. 



FOREMAN. HARRY R. 

the praise." "Keeping on the path of duly, caring not for 

praise nor blame." 



FRASER, MARJORIE A. 

"Merry to walk with, merry to talk with, 
And a good friend withal." 

Marjorie started from Tottenham, passed 



Collingwood claimed II any during his Pub 
lie and High School days. Migrating to through Parkdale, arrived at Varsity. Stop- 
Was Treasurer of the Toronto, he became a follower of Epicurus, ping four years, she has amused herself with 
lent of the Biological studying Physics for a pastime. He promises Modems and acquired a remarkable taste for 
well in Mechanics. executive prominence. Shortly she leaves 

for ? 




GALBRAITH, FLOSSIE 



"The th in ,/s are /.■;.■ 
In friendship's name 



she would not do. 



Floss came to College from liridgeburg to 
indulge in Classics and Queen's Hall parties. 
President of Classical Association '18. Hob- 
bies navel and hot baths. Horror — essays. 



GORDON. ELIZABETH D. 

"Shall J compare thee to a summer day 
Thou art more lovely and more temporate." 

From Westbourne College Betty plunged 
into the labors of Household Science, to 
emerge a triumphant cuisiniere. Her other 
accomplishments were serving in offices and 
making friends. 



GRAHAM, ELSIE C. 

"Who is this with rusty locks, 
A little late' I that never -hocks 
Us now). Her voice is musical: 
Her logic is proverbial ; 
Good coffee is her great delight ; 
And cheering people when they fight ; 
And little lists of things to do. 
And doing things she oughtn't to. 
She falls down stairs with dignity, 
lint's must at home when pouring tea.' 



GRASS. A. O. 

"The student was stung for u miserable 'sup' 
Even as you and I." 
Name? — Arch. Born? — Yes. Where? — St. 
Catharines. Aged. — Yes. Business? — Rotten. 
College? — U. C. Course? — General. Activi- 
ties? — Active two months in Classics; since 
inactive in General except in Junior Year, of 
which he was President. Deserting Classics, 
nevertheless a "Greek" — signifying gentleman 
and friend. 



17 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 




~^Mmm&mmi$m^ 







^mw mmmmi 



GREGORY. WILLIAM F. 

"There already blooms a certain Paradise 
some fait est I 

Horn in Collingwoo.l. 1S''1, "Kill" enteicd 
Varsit) with the class of '14 Overseas with 
ili Fourth University Company in 1915, rein- 
forcing P. P. C. L. I. Wounded rune, 
1916. Married May, 1917 Discharged Oc- 
tober 1917. President of graduating class 
Member Torontonensis Board. A man with a 
great past and a greater future. 



HAIG. HELEN M. 

"The reason firm, the temperate will. 
Endurance, foresight, strength and skill/* 

Educated 



HALLIDAY, J. MAUDE 

" 'Tis the mind that shines in ex cry grace 
And chiefly in her roguish e'en/' 



Past Born at Baltimore, ( ml 

at Baltimore and Cobourg. 
Present University Household Science. 
Future Uncertain — but if enthusiasm and 



Adhering firmly to that which site believed 
to be worth while in iife Maude has sailed 
safely through the storms and calms of a 
four years' voyage in M. iV P. Her bright 

the power of concentration are the key to brown eyes and Scotch personality have won 

success, it should be vey bright. steadfast friends. 



HARRISON. EDITH P. 

"Nobod me a dunce, 

Some peol U say I'm defer." 

Habitat Dunnville 

Small, dark and lively. 

Ambition— -To becom a famous cook and 
put tin science into Household. 

Achievement- at College — Fulfilled her am- 
bition and cheered the dreary liv. 
undei g i aduat - of both si 




HARVIE. WILLIAM P. 

"To this his purpose true all undismayed, 
B a -'■ > fieri ulean and unafi aid 
0) smiles oi frowns he kepi his steadfast 
-.ray." 

I In product of chequered experiences, a dis- 
ciple "i Mai aulay. 

Hi- philospphy, history "thi essence of in- 
numei abli ''i' >g i aphies." 



HILES. E. GWENDOLYN 

"<>/ winning speech, endearing, unless. Inn, I." 

Gwen took her Honour Matric. at Jarvis 
i ollegiate and entered Universitj College in 
1914. Popularity ensured by her ever-ready 
smile and favourite expression "Sister So and 
So." Energetic President Anglican Club, 
1917-18. 



HOOD. ANNIE I. 
" I Rose-bud set ; 



,lh little 
1897 



wilful Thon 

Matriculate. 1 



Born — Tn Barrie, 

Stayner. 1913 
Course — ( General. 

Hobbies — Skating and fruit-picking. 
Remarks Kind-hearted and jolly. 
"She loves a ioke, and hint. is to call around. 



HOOD. RETA M. 

"True of In-art. 

Reta came "ad lucem 
lated ai Stayner, [913. 
1914 to partii ipate in 
Her jollj disposition 

her many friend-. 
Here's to R< la I 



1898, and matricu- 
She entered Varsity 

till I .rlli 

1 al>ilit\ to -kate won 



18 






HORNING. FREDERICK J. 

"He reads much, he is a great observer, and 
<oks quite through the deeds of men." 

Freddie's smiling countenance and great 
powers of speech have won him recognition in 
"Commerce and Finance " Political Economy, 
Politics and Transportation are his special- 
ties. His old briar is seldom cold. 



JAMIESON A. F. 

"Agin anything everybody else is for." 

Jamie first kicked in Rothesay, Scotland, 
Tune, 1894 — kicking ever since. In Varsity 
succumbed to Semitics. Home, Toronto. Re- 
ligion, doubtful. Reading, French novels 
Politics, Radical. Hobby, fussing. Destina- 
tion, we would like to know? 



KENNEDY, GRETTA 

".t heart to resolve, a head to contrive." 

Matriculated in Wingham, and entered 
Household Science. Of many moods, with 
not a sour one among them, she has helped 
Lit. and Class Executives, and was Toast- 
mistress at Queen's Hall Dinner for '17 
Seniors. 



KILNER, MABEL W. 

"Such a friend do I remember. 
Whom In see her was to love her." 

Mabel has spent most of her life in Toronto. 
Graduating from Westbourne, she entered Col- 
lege, and has successfully devoted her ener- 
gies to Household Science, The Dramatic 
Club, and the Class Executive. 




LEE. MARJORIE 

"We grant although she had much wit, 

She 'ens very shy of using it." 

Moderns first claimed Marjorie upon ma- 
triculating from Hamilton Collegiate. Later 
the General Course proved irresistible and 
she voluntarily answered its call. Ever popu- 
lar, she won the Vice-Presidency of her fourth 
year. 



LEWIS. MURIEL 

"Rare compound of oddity, frolic and fun." 

St. Thomas, which in a large moment lent 
us Muriel, now wants her back. Reluctantly we 
return her and report: Scholarship — sufficient; 
friendship — satisfying ; offices — a vice-presi- 
dency : athletics — tennis; acquisitions — facts, 
friends, fun and a B.A. 



LEWIS, 

'■/ 



VICTOR G 

ha 



found you an argument." 

— Boswell. 

Born Sept. 11th, 1892, Birmingham, Eng- 
land. Now a thorough Canadian. Matric. 
.Tarvis Collegiate, Toronto. Vice-Pres. Mission 
Society (1916). Pres. Literary Society (191?) 
at Wycliffe. Graduates in P S. — "A faithful 
student and a clear thinker. The Church needs 
men like him !" 



LITTLEFIELD, EDITH I. 

"An able man shows liis spirit by gentle 
words and resolute actions." 

Born at Springfield, III. Matriculated from 
Havergal, Edith, through her ability and tire- 
less energy in the interests of others, soon 
gained class distinctions and popularity. With 
her name are associated a sterling character 
and golden deeds. 



19 






LOWRIE. ROBERT J. 

"A man ,'/ well attempered frame." 

Handicapped by making initial appearance 
in Hamilton. Grad from over the Dim (River- 
dale C. I.. Toronto). Sometime impersonator 
uf Kubelik ; and burlesquer at the "mock" '16. 
His favourite authors throughout his earthly 
areei have been Hovle and Mathematics 



LUCAS. JESSIE 



Shi 
She 



has wit mi*! fun and fire, 
has the truest, kindest heart. 



\i Glen Mawr and Branksome Hall Jessie 
became inspired with a zeal for Moderns, 
which neither Anglo-Saxon nor ( > 1 < 1 French 
have been able to daunt. Should the lure of 
tin business world not prove too strong we 
should suggesl a Post G/aduate course m 
Anglo Saxon. 



LYON. MARJORY 

A cheery fire, a comfy chair, 

A Gardner, Morley or "dictionnaire." 

A merry throng from work set free, 
Lights and laughter — and cups of tea. 
Executives sitting in solemn state. 
Proclaiming on matters of fearful weight 
Maids in gown anil mortar hoard. 
Among them, she — a just reward! 



MacGOWAN. JESSIE E. 

Oh, who is this? A maiden fair, 

With fearless eyes ami golden hair, 

I If -lately port, 

She is a maid who loves to knit. 

She's famed for puns and flashing wit 

Ami quick retort 

But —'twere idle to name all her graces 

arts. 
Suffice it to say — she's a lady of parts. 



and 




MacMILLAN. DOROTHY R. 
"Born to write, converse, and live with 
"i i aigmount," 



Edin 



Formative influences 

burgh : P.C I. 
c haracteristics : Keen wit: unwavering l"\ 

alls. 
Preoccupations: Afternoon tea; dramatics; 

Presidencj of Modern Language Club. 
Recreations: College coin si ; Pi Beta Phi. 
Destinj : In g 1 hands her own. 



MACPHERSON. ELSINORE 

Societies joined she. 
Hooks in force. 
Now she"s a Rebel, 

I >l C0U1 -' 



MacTAVISH. F. 



GERTRUDE. 

lit pleasi 



"Who mixed reason 
dom with mirth." 

From Kemptville "Gert" migrated to To- 
ronto in search of higher education. A dili- 
gent student — always successful — in her senior 
year on the class executive. Modesty and sin- 
cerity have won for her many friends. 



in an to labor in his 



McCORDIC. IVAN C. 

" 'TlS 110 sill tor .1 

vocation." 

".Mike" landed in S. Dakota about 2.! years 
ago. He received his elementary and - 
arj education in the woods (Forest. Ont.), 
where as a sometime active participant in 
baseball he was famous. Only those "steeped" 
in true democratic principles may have audi- 
ence with this disciple of Uncle Sam. 



'20 



mm ^ 






McCULLOUGH. CHARLOTTE S. 

"There is nothing like being modest." 

Charlotte was born and educated in Harris- 
ton; entered Honour Biology 1T8, and ob- 
tained the Daniel Wilson Scholarship for Bi- 
ology in her third year. Her quiet humour 
was much appreciated by all who knew her. 



McDOUGALL, JEAN L. 

"Something m ilka part o' thee, 
To praise, to love, I find" 

Venturing forth from the Capital in pursuit 
of elusive knowledge, Jean anchored at Varsity 
through the long, exacting years of English 
and History, always remaining true to her old 
loves — Burns and Hot Water. 



McINROY. ALICE H. 

".I heart to resolve, a head to contrive, 
and a hand to execute." 

Alice matriculated from Saskatoon C. I. in 
1910 and entered Varsity with the class of 
'18. Her sincerity has won her many friends 
and her capability points to success in future. 



McLELLAN. ROBERT F. 



id and good fellowship 



" There's ,ill of inanh, 
in thee." 

R. F. McLellan was born in 1895 at To- 
ronto His pursuit of knowledge led him on 
through Harbord C. T. to University College. 
In his final year "Mac" served efficiently upon 
the Class Executive and among his friends 
established himself so firmly that their best 
wishes will follow him all the rest of his days. 







McMURTRY. MARION J. 

"Into Varsity, why not knowing 
Nor whence;" 

From the prairies of Saskatchewan Marion 
brought to Varsity the sunshine of her smile. 
Her future is undecided, but, due to her 
boundless ambitions, Fame may yet claim 
her as her own. 



McNAIR, ALICE A. 

"The little deeds of Grace that daily flozv 
From every word and action." 

Born near Richmond Hill, where her school 
days were spent ; graduated from Varsity with 
'18 class Her unselfishness and thought for 
others made her a general favourite. 



MANSER. VELMA M. 
"But oh, she dances 



sneli 



a way 



Little Miss Mauser, 

"Une petite 'romancer 

From Parkdale to Moderns did stray. 

With music and dancing 

And ideals entrancing. 

She will make a most fetching B.A. 



MEEK. MURIEL I. 

"( ool, unperturbed by stress and hurry, 
Inclined to work, but not to worry." 

Muriel matriculated from the St. Thomas 
Collegiate. Entered Varsity with the English 
and History Class of '18. Served on the 
Class Executive in her second year. Academic 
and social life characterized by unfailing op- 
timism and cheerfulness. 



21 




MILLAR. CLAIRE 

"Many are called, but few get up, 
Especially in the mot ning 

"Physics, Lab, Basketball and Gym, 
In all she entered with eager vim. 
Then after four yi ars she left the hall 
Carrying with her the good wishes of all.' 



MOORE. GRACE E. 

"./ smiling eye, a brow serene, 

.1 irmly wit. a friendly mien.' 



PARK LEONORA 

"lltih many a Social Virtue Graced 



PECK. HELEN R. 

".in, I here's t' other.' 



London, Varsity, Biology, Class Vice l'iei 



Leonora was horn in Uxbridge. where she In choice of course mathematical, in others' 

received part of her elementary education, service ready, in friendship true and loyal, in 
dent '14, Secretary Biological Club '15. Be- completing it at Peterborough. Her class have faith an Anglican, and in all things most just. 
sides storing knowledge with the (more or shown their appreciation of her by making her 
less) studious ones of Queen's Hall, Grace Prophetess of the graduating year. 
specialized in labs, medical dances, German (?) 
and knitting. 



m 






POAG. MYRTLE I. 
"Here is <i friend both for earnest and sport." 

Myrtle came forth from Hamilton Collegiate, 
entered Varsitj and General. 

Achievements Head 'oil o| Queen's Hall; 
G.W.C V Cabinet '16 and W.U. \ Execu- 
tive '\7. 

Characteristics "1 hati a dumpy man" and 
" Let's have a pat i j 



PRATT. E. R. ISAAC 

"Born <>[ pure heart, a, it spawned far schem- 
ing brain." 

"Si" is a pioneer of Stittsville, Out., the 
land of milk and honey. Attended Smith's 
Falls Collegiate. Prominent in Athletics. En- 
tered M. & IV Class '17, hut due to misfor- 
tune joined happy throng of Class '18. 



PURDOM. JEAN 

"A maiden of am ( ealnry." 
Act. I. — London C. 1. 



PURDOM. MARGARET 

"It's nae to act »/■ hi the morning but- 
From Western University Margaret migrated 



Act. II. — Scene I. : Western University for to Varsity. During the last year she turned 

two years. Scene IT. — Toronto Varsity from earthlj studies to heavenlj ones We 

ditto. sincerely hope that her magnetic personality 

Act. III. — Who knows'' may attract only ethereal 



22 






QUINN WILLIAM R. 

" II 'hatever sky's abo't e 
line's a heart for every fate." 

Born near Kincardine. 

Graduate of Kincardine High School. 

Entered Biology, 1914. 

President of the I'.iological Club. '17-'1S 



RAE. MARGARET 

"A little learning scattered o'er 

. I frolic of four years or nunc . 

Then -Presto, change — and yon create 

The sober college graduate.' 
It was in Toronto that Margaret made her 
initial appearance, and in time entered Har- 
bord Collegiate. Entered Varsity to swell the 
ranks of Moderns 1T8 and is very popular 
with her fellow-students. Site has never al- 
lowed her studies to interfere with her edu- 
cation. 



RAMSAY, WILLIAM V. 

"Hath his bellyful of fighting." 
In 1891 at Londesboro, Ontario, "Bill' 



b. 



came the joy of the manse and. strange to say, 
determined some time to occupy one himself. 
For this Ottawa began his education and 
Varsity got the job of finishing it. Enlisted 
in 5th University Co., P.P.C.L.I., on Decem- 
ber 9, 1915. Wounded on July 13, 1916, at 
VTpres, and returned in time to finish with 'IS 



RICHARDSON, 
"A lawyer a 



FRANK W. 
t ih, ni — draii 



mil nigh." 



Frank hails from the West. Was prepared 
for matriculation at Red Deer High School, 
Uberta, and Harbord C. 1. Entered Univer- 
sity College in Political Science with 1T8. 
Expects to continue his studies at Osg le 






RIDDLE. WINNIFRED C. 



"Who -cants 

Let Inn: be 



friend 

fric ml." 



Horn in Toronto. Education at Harbord Col- 
legiate and University Household Science. She 
plays a little, works a little, smiles more than 
a little. Generosity, kindness and unselfish- 
ness are her weapons, and sin uses them to 
storm tin- hearts of all who know her. 



ROGERS. FRANKFORD E. 

". I little blame, a little fame, 
A star-gleam an a stone." 

To his loving memory. Born in Ottawa, 
April 2(1, 1897. Matriculated in 1914 and en- 
ured the "popular" course, which he honour- 
ably pursued to the end. Departed this life 
May, 1918, to the realms of law, beloved and 
respected by all who knew him. 



SALTER. W. RALPH 

"Youth shows hut half . . ." 

Came from Parkdale Collegiate to exercise 
his intuition in Political Science, Queen's Hall 
and affairs generally, thereby winning the two 
first scholarships, the Ellis Medal, the Poli- 
tical Economy Club presidency, highest hon- 
ours and truest friends. 



SAMPSON. R. ALAN 

"There is much in a name!' 

Horn at Toronto 1X95; attended St. An- 
drew's; edited THE VARSITY; Secretary ot 
Permanent Executive; studied Political 
Science, hopes to enter Osgoode ; a budding 
bachelor (?) — yet. despite all, u cheery soul 
Long may he live! 



•23 






SCHOTT. MAXWELL 

"He was little, 
lie was wise, 

Hi- was a ti-iii'i 
For his size." 

Assets A curly pomp, wit, a good sense of 

humour and a congenial "pal." 
Liabilities — An inveterate smoker, a "fus- 
ser" and a dance fend 



SHARP, DORATHEA 

"Nee vixii male qui natus moriensque fefellit." 
Born in London, England, in the I890's. 



Entered Varsity 

forth has found a 
ness in philosophy. 



1914, and from that time 
source of intense blessed- 



SIMPSON, WINIFRED N. 

"Enthusiasm is the Genius of Sincerity." 

Winifred Simpson, after sampling several 
Public and High Schools, entered Varsity with 
the year '18. One of her chief interests is 
Athletics, having been Captain of the Hockey 
team and President of the Athletic Associaiion. 



SINCLAIR, MURIEL G. 

"A truer friend were hard to seek." 

An honour graduate of Parkdale Collegiate, 
Muriel entered Household Science with the 
class of 1T8. She proved herself an able 
student and one worthy of her position on 
iln Permanent Executive. 




SKENE, M. VERA 

eat '■» are young, but her expo ieni e old, 
Her head unmellowed, but her judgment ripe." 

Born At The Manse, Hillsdale, Ont., 1897. 
Matriculated at tiavelock, Ont., 1913. 

' ■ lUrSI 1 e rural. 
Hobby— Pink I . as. 

Remarks Served on V.W.C.A. Cabinet 
191 16 l h, evci talk? 



SMITH, ALICE I. 

"A little time for laughter 
A little time to sing." 

AIhi hails from Jarvis C. I., entering Mod- 
ern-. Bright, energetic, with ready Irish wit, 
she soon endeared herself to many friends. \s 
fourth year Rep. on the Woman Students' 
Council she showed her executive ability. 
"Smiddy" was one of the bright lights of 1T8, 



SMITH, HELEN M. 

"Fire in each eye ami papers in each hand. 
She raves, recites and maddens 'round the 
land." Pope. 

Prologue — Seven scholarships. 
First Act- First Class. 
Second Act- Second Class. 
Third Act Third Class. 
Fourth Act I!. L. ? ? 
Epilogue < >m- human being. 



SMITH. KATHLEEN 

"But how in such short space ran one describe 
her e.\i ellencies '" 

Graduating from Parkdale Collegiate with 
honours, "Kae" successfully sought higher 
knowledge in the Household Science Course 

Her bright and cheery personality has won 
for her a host of friends 










k 



SMITH, LEONARD 

"You are the type the age is looking for." 
Graduated from Jarvis Collegiate. Arts 
and Theology taken concurrently preparatory 
to work in the Anglican Ministry. 



SQUAIR. MARION R. 

These I have loved : 

A puck and stick on good keen ice : 

A striking part to play ; a field to hoe: 

Long walks on country roads, 

Cool water and the "crawl" ; 

(lasses in Spanish : songs in French, the 

plough ; 
Let me have these and earth becomes Elysium. 



STOBIE, HAZEL 

"She has wit and song and sense. 
Mirth and sport and eloquence." 

At St. Kitts ('. I., Westminster Collegi 
This blithesome maid first sought her km 

edge— 
\ arsity Moderns, then General. '18. 
( hi Class Executive ; in Dramatics keen 
Head Girl "No. 9," Queen's Hall elected, 
A brilliant future for this B.A. expected. 



STUART, NORMA K. 

"A smile for all, a welcome glad, 
A jovial coaxing way she had." 

Varsity and Queen's Hall welcomed Norma 
in her second year General, after Mitchell 
and Stratford had done their best. Varsity 
link and the numerous parties of "the Bunch" 
counteracted the plague of her life — labs. 




SWEET. JOSEPH A. 

". /// the Latin I construe is 'num.' 1 love '" 

Born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 21, 189". Honor matriculation Hamilton 
Collegiate Institute, 1914. Entered the Poli- 
tical Science course in the same year. News 
Editor of "The Varsity," 1917, and became 
Managing Editor in the spring term of 1918. 
President Menorah Society. 1918. Osgoode 
Mall next. 



TANTON, E. ISABEL 

"To find the bottom of I he well 
Where Truth is hidden." 

After spending two years at Western Uni- 
versity, Isabel brought to 1T8 her mathema- 
tical mind. The Class Executive of 1916-1/ 
numbered her among its own. We shall al- 
ways remember her good judgment and sin- 
cere friendliness. 



THOMPSON. J. CARL 

"Drink deep, or touch not the spring of 
knowledge." 

Carl entered upon the primrose path of life 
near Stayner. Graduating from Collingwood 
Collegiate, he attended Faculty in 1911-1912. 
After two years of kid-walloping he joined 
'IS in order to delve in Physics. 



WALLACE. OLGA A. 

"She makes a friend where'er she goes." 

Olga received her early education at St. 
Joseph's Academy, later joining the ranks ot 
1T8, Household Science. She lias admirably 
combined academic with athletic abilities, be- 
ing a member ■»{ the Vthletic Executive. 






WHITE. MARY OLIVE 

"Music was her fairy godmother" and 
.1 her with such gifts oi harmony as 
were manifested not only in melodious sounds, 
luii in her even temper and amiable disposi- 
tion. Educated al Niagara Palls, N.Y., and 
Moulton College, Toronto. Musical Direc- 

I . SS, I'I'N. 



WILEY. NORA R. 

"Thus doth she move about us day by day, 
Loving and loved. " 

This is tin- keynote of Nora's philosophy 
nf lift-. liorn in Toronto, attended Jarvis Col- 
legiate, entering Varsity, joined Student Vol- 
unteer Band, of which she became Vice-Presi- 
dent in graduating year. 



WILKINSON. R. WYLIE 

"Who can tell what subtle guile 
Doth lie behind that wily smile " 

The smile first radiated at Gait, April 26, 
1896. Early discipline (?) at G.C I. Hockey 
ability, with weakness for championship 
teams"; Varsity I.. 1915; Junior O.H.A., 1916. 
Executes on C. & F. Club and Permanent 
Executives. Normal tendency towards fussing. 



WYLIE. MARGARET C. 

"The Gods approve the depth 

Ind not the tumult of the soul." 

Delight in growing things; a course in 
science, love for teaching; a sense of humour 
- -what qualities could better augur sua 
the West — Margaret's chosen hoi 




YOUREX. ISABELLE C. 

''For her fate gave a nature 
Sloping to the Southern side." 

This merry maid was born at Keen, matri- 
culated from Norwood High School and en- 
tered Varsity in 1914 where she made her 
life one sweet record of ,\v(:\ and charity. 



26 




PERMANENT EXECUTIVE, CLASS 1T8, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE. 

TOP ROW— J. ]'.. Brodie, R. W. Wilkinson, F. J. Horning. 
BOTTOM K()\V Miss M. Sinclair. 1< A. Sampson, Miss E Littlefield. 



27 



Class 1 T8 History 



Like many another class that has gone before, the time has 
come for us to conclude the chronicles of our undergraduate days. 
Like them, we might tell of our class parties, our receptions, our 

athletics; the \ ear has not been lacking in class spirit. But the 
significance of our story lies in facts Ear other than these. The 
whole course of our University life has been spent under the 
shadow of war. Ninety-nine of our number have gfone to serve 



their country overseas. Some have returned, their duty done. 
.Many more will not return. Others of us. women and men alike, 
have turned to work in munitions factories and on farms; and 
ever-present knitting needles remind us that the chief concern 
of our girls is the welfare of the boys "over there. - ' This final 
chapter of the undergraduate history of the Class of University 
College 1T8 we dedicate to our comrades on active service: 



Abernethy, 1 1. F. 
Armstrong, Y. \V. 
Ballantvne, L. R. 
Barritt,'A. E. 
liar foot. VV. F. 
Batten, B. 
Bird, M. H. 
Breuls, 11. A. C. 
Bolte, A. A. 
Brown, R. A. 
Bull, F. L. 
Call. G. W. 
( 'atiev. A. 1'.. 
Carlyle, 1). I'.. 
Cockburn, R. S. 
Cody. H. M. 
( 'urrie. \. E. 
Davis. G. W. 
Drope, |. H.'N. 
Drynan, T. V. 
Duggan, A. M. 
Eldon, F. I. 
Ellis, I). O. 
Fauvel, L. C. 
Flynn, M. L 



Foote, G. E. 
Ferguson, J. R. 
Ferguson, N. C. 
Findley, T. 1. 
( ieddes. G. W. 
Geddes, W. K. 
Gillespie, J. 
( ii todeve, S. M. 
( i« ii idman, A. H. 
( I ray, A. D. 
( irummet, W. J. 
< Gregory, \\". F. 
1 [ammond, ( r. S. 
Ilellmuth, F. G. 
I lolmes, G. B. 
Houston, F. B. 
Flume, A. D. 
Howell, E. 
Johnston, B. EC. 
Johnston, E. 1'. 
Johnstone. J. E. 
h mes, C. A. 
h mes, ( '. G. 
Kerr, W. B. 
Kert, L. 



Kirkpatrick, ( \. I ). 
Lea, C. W. 
Leitch, Miss St. C. 
Laventure, G. E. 
Lawrence, H. 
Lawson, FI. H. 
Lindsay. A. B. 
Lyon, G. S. 
MacPherson, S. M. 
Manzer, R. 
McCurdy, L. H. 
McDonald. X. F. 
McRay, R. A. 
McRay, R. R. 
Moore. J. G 
Morden. J. R. 
Malcolm, A. G. 
Morrell, ]. A. 
Mulholland, D. B. 
Marani, G. R. 
Mustard, W. M. 
\i >xon, F. C. 
Park. G. II. 
Primrose, IT. P. 
Rickaby, 1 1. C. 



Redman. E. 1 1. 
Rogers. W. W. 
Ross. |. II. 
Reid. H. W. 
Ryerson, \Y. M. 
Skey, W. R. 
Smith. R. L. 
Snyder, L. 
Stoddart, W. O. 
Soule, I. E. 
Sutton. L. V. 
Taylor. E. H. 
Thompson, C. A. 
Thompson, D. X. 
Thompson. E. 
Twohey, W. F. 
Wardlaw, X. 
Watson, P. C. 
Wellington, C. W 
Wilson, 1. T. 
Wilson. W. R. 
Wilson. W. T. 
Wright, P. 
Wood, F. 



2S 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE FOURTH YEAR EXECUTIVE. 191718. 

TOP ROW— Miss M. A. Lyon, Poetess; Miss F. G McTavish, Larly Councillor; R. F. McLellan, Athletic Representative; 

Miss M. O. White. A.TC.M., Musical Directress; W. R. Salter. 2nd Historian: Miss M. Buck, 1st Historian: 

Miss G. Kennedy, Lady Councillor. 
BOTTOM ROW — F. J. Horning, Secretary; Miss M Lee, Vice-President; \V. F. Gregory, President; Miss X. Park. 

Prophetess ; J. A. Holes, Treasurer. 



•ill 



Class 1T9 History 



"Learning is ever in the freshness of its youth even for the old." 

— . leschylus. 

"And history with all its volumes vast 
I lath but one page." 

( )ne might well l>e forgiven for supposing Byron to have been 
on the editorial staff of Torontonensis, so aptly do his words 
apply. For "but one page" have we, and our sole problem is how 
tn condense the activities of so notable a body as the year oi 1T9 
in si i small a space. 

( >ur third year and our third pair of spectacles through which 
we look at college life. The hopeful vivacity of our first and the 
complacent progress of our second year are no more. Complexity 
lias gripped us and our only hope lies in our fourth year. Let 
the moralist teach us his lesson! 

It is impossible to be normal in such abnormal days, for our 
class has breathed no college air that was not heavy with war. 
This year, however, the machinery of the University runs more 
smoothly. There has even been a happy revival of the much- 
lauded but very elusive "college spirit." Coming - back last fall. 



we were impressed with the new vitality we found in the old 
societies of U. C. New societies have also been founded, among 
others "Le Club Politique," which is composed of men students 
of 1T9 registered in Honour Constitutional History. P.ut there 
is a lighter side. 

With the respect for wisdom land age) which has always 
characterized our year, we decided to follow the precedent set 
by 1T8 and forgo our usual class reception, not that sociability 
has been discouraged — far from it ! Very successful class parties 
have already been held at the Union, and plans of a strikingly 
original character are entertained for the future. 

Amid all the activities in class, college and university, 1T9 
sometimes gasps — C. ( >. T. ('.. Victory Bonds, T mixers. Woman 
Suffrage, Union Government, Snowbirds. Y. M. C. A., all claim- 
ing our attention — (), yes, and we almost forgot — our inspiring- 
lectures ! 

But amid them all, amid all the opportunities which we are 
enjoying, we are not unmindful of the members of our Class who 
are sacrificing these opportunities in order to seize another and 
a higher opportunity not vouchsafed to us. To them our thoughts 
go out in greeting "from 1T9 a1 home to 1T9 abroad." 



30 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE THIRD YEAR EXECUTIVE, L917-18. 

TOP ROW — T. M. Mungovan, Treasurer; W. A. Murray, Athletic Director; Mi-- M. E. Walters, Prophetess; A. S. P. 

Woodhouse, 2nd Historian; Miss 1). Parsons, Lady Councillor. Miss M. Janus, Musical Directress: C. C. Downey, 

Gentleman Councillor. . 

BOTTOM ROW— G E. Macnab, Secretary: Miss A. V. II. Peene, 1st Vice-President; II. C. Buchanan, President; M. 

Horner, 3nd Vice-President; Miss R. Strong, 1st Historian. 



■M 



Class 2T0 Hislory 



2T0 came hack to college alter a very strenuous summer. For 
the women's part their experiences of the holidays had been 
many and varied. The call for National Service workers had 
come before college closed, and many volunteered, anxious to do 
their bit in winning the war. Farming appealed to some, muni- 
tions to others, but in both kinds of work the women showed 
themselves capable of taking the places left vacant by the men 
enlisted for service overseas. Since entering upon their second 
year the women have shown great interest in various college 
affairs and have taken an active part in the "Lit." the Dramatic 
Club and Y. \V. C. A. work. Especially noticeable was the part 
they played in the Fruit Pickers' entertainment, held at Convo- 
cation Hall, the proceeds of which were given for the relief of 
the I lalifax sufferers. 

As far as the men's activities are concerned, the Class of 2T0 
in its second year has shown quite as much initiative as even 
the most sanguine-minded had hoped For. Of course the C. O. 
T. C. with its military drill, agility exercises, and the special 
physical training at the gymnasium, affects this year as well as 
the others. At the big"T"mixers held in the Central Y. M. C. A. 
2T0 men have been quite conspicuous. The Melting Pol enter- 



tainment, in which the University College "Singers of the Sunny 
South'' was so much enjoyed, had a considerable number of our 
men in its cast to help make it a success. 

We believe that our year has not been outdone by others in 
the proportion of its men who have withdrawn from college life 
[or war service. The Royal Flying Corps and the University 
Training Company have claimed the greater number of these 
recruits. There are just forty-eight men in our year, but these. 
who have been unable to enlist, have at least exhibited the proper 
patriotic spirit at home. In the recent campaign of University 
men organized to sell Victory Bonds, the men of the year 
showed the greatest enthusiasm, and as a result of their work 
brought great praise to the University through the head of the 
Victory Loan Committee. 

As far as the social side of the second year is concerned, the 
programme decided upon was a series of class parties instead of 
the usual class reception. This change was made in order to 
lessen the expenses of the year, and the first of these entertain- 
ments was held at the Women's Union. All present enjoyed 
themselves either dancing or playing cards and hoped for the 
repetition of such an evening several times throughout the year. 



32 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE SECOND YEAR EXECUTIVE. 

""' ROW— W. J L>. Archibald, 2nd Gentleman Councillor; Miss O'Heir, 1st Historian: W. Oliphant, Treasurer; B. Under- 
wood, 1st Gentleman Councillor; Miss Pringle, Prophetess; M. Parker, Judge. 

MIDDLE ROW— H. J. Strong, Secretary; Miss Hewitt, 1st Vice-President: M. D. C. Tait, President; L. Patrick. 2nd Vice- 
President: Miss Chalmers, Poetess. F. Silverman, Athletic Representative. 

BOTTOM ROW— Miss Cray, 2nd Lady Councillor; Miss Connolly, Musical Directress; Miss Ross, 2nd Lady Councillor 

ABSENT— M. Rogers, 2nd Historian. 



33 




UNIVERSITY COLLE 



FIRST YEAR EXECUTIVE. 



TOP ROW II. I. F. Stewart, Orator; D. H. Gallagher, 2nd Historian ; W. C. Stephens, 2nd Gentleman Councilor; Miss 
I II ChanI Poetess; D. T. Fotheringham, Athletic Director; Miss I). Cornette, Musical Directress 

MIDDLE ROW Miss M Bell, 1st Lady Councillor; E. I Taxi-. Secretary; Miss E. G. Leggett, 1st Vice-President ; B..-U 
Noble, President; H. \. McLennan, 2nd Vice-President; II II. Marsh, Treasurer; Miss Bristol, 2nd Lady Councilor. 

BOTTOM ROW Miss ( Sereth, Prophetess; Miss E. L. Barton, 1st Historian. 



:u 




THE WOMEN'S UNDERGRADUATE ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, 1917-18. 

Till' ROW — Mary Anderson, Treasurer; Mary Brebner, Margery Cook, Myrtle Poag, Elsie Graham. 

BOTTOM ROW— Helen Smith; Mabel Child, President; Miss M. Wrong, Hon. President; Winnifred Simpson, Vice-President; Nina Millen, 
Secretary. 

The Women's Undergraduate Association of University College 



Six years ago the W. L'. A. was formed, for the purpose of 
developing a spirit of unity among the women of University 
College. Since the formation of the Association many changes 
affecting the life of the women undergraduates have taken place. 
The greatest of these changes has been the institution of that 
haven of women students, the Union. By providing a suitable 
meeting place, the Union has removed the chief obstacle in the 
way of the accomplishment of the purpose of the W. U. A. The 
executive of the Association is endeavouring to interest and to 
unite the students bv arranging a programme of meetings at 
which the political questions and patriotic needs of the day are 
considered. 

Following the example of the preceding year, a series of 
Red Cross teas arc being held at the Union. In order that the 
women may gain a knowledge of the political questions of the 



day, and so exercise their newly acquired right of suffrage intelli- 
gently, speakers are being secured to address the members on 
political subjects, such as "The Canadian Franchise Laws." 

The system of monthly contribution to the Uvd Cross, as 
established by the executive of last year, is being continued. 
Donations from the students are collected regularly by the 
treasurer of the \Y. U. A. and handed over to the Red Cross. 

Some meetings are being devoted to the promotion of interest 
in National Service work. The Association hopes, by presenting 
the urgent need for workers on the farm and bv the enthusiasm 
of those who were engaged in this sort of labor last year, to be 
able to enlist a creditable number of volunteers from the College. 

Thus the W. U. A. is striving to carry out its old ideal ol 
unity, and with it a new ideal — that of patriotic service. 



35 




ANGLICAN WOMEN'S CLUB, 1917-18. 

TOP R< >W M. Belton, 1st Vear Representative; V. Wright, Faculty Representative; M. Conk, 3rd Year Representative; IT. Rankin, Secretary; 

G. Bruce, 4tli Year Representative. 
BOTTOM ROW B. Irwin, Treasurer; Mrs. Griffith Thomas, Hon, President; G, Hiles, President; M. Smart. Vice-President; M. Watts, Hon. 

Vice-President. 



Anglican Women's Club, 1917-18 



The Women's Anglican Club was organized in the year 
1908, for the purpose "I" promoting friendly feeling and comrade- 
ship among its members. 

Fortnightly social meetings arc held, alternately at the 
Church of England Deaconess Mouse and the home of the 
honorary president. At these meetings Red Cross work is done, 
and occasional addresses are given before the members. 

A new feature, introduced this year, is the Sunday afternoon 
Bible Study Class, which has proved of interest and enjoyment. 
Although the membership is not large, active interest is displayed 
by tlu- members, and the club is thriving:. 



Executive : 

President Miss G. Hiles 

Honorary President .Mrs. G. Thomas 

Vice-President Miss M. Smart 

I lonorarv Vice-President Miss "Watts 

Treasurer Miss B. Irwin 

Secretary Miss 11. Rankin 

Faculty Representative Miss X. Wright 

Fourth Year Representative Miss G. Rruce 

Third Year Representative Miss M. Cook 

First "Scar Representative Miss M. Helton 



36 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE WOMEN'S LITERARY SOCIETY, 1917-18. 

TOP Row Moyna Gibb, 1st War Representative; Frieda Waldon, Treasu:er; Gretta Kennedy, 4th 'tear Representative; Edith William-., Cones 

ponding Secretary: Mary Will'amson, 2nd Year Representative 
BOTTOM ROW— Olive Cale, Critic; Marguerite Cooper, Vice-President: Elsie Graham, President: Mis. A. F. B. Clarke, Hon. President; Alfreda 

Elliott, Recording Secretary; Evangeline Harris, 3rd War Representative 

The Women's Literary Society of University College 



Modern Authors was the general theme undertaken for the 
year, and the enthusiasm of the members has proved that it was 
a subject of universal interest. As the subject was one which 
required pioneer work, it was decide. 1 to ask the professors to 
address the meetings. No special development of thought was 
adhered to. as the executive thought the addresses would be even 
more inspiring if the professors chose the men in whom they 
were most interested. 

The following are the speakers and the subjects which they 
chose. Dr. II. T. 15. Clark spoke on "The Conundrum of the 
Workshop," the new conception of Art as set forth by Croce ; 
Dr. Alexander on "J. M. Synge and the Irish Theatre"; Dr. 
Fairly on "Joseph Conrad"; Dr. Cordon on "George Meredith"; 
Professory DeLury on "Irish Mysticisms"; Professor Kennedy 
on "Mrs. Meynell"; Dr. Wallace and Professor Will on different 
phases of War Literature. Each address was full of interest and 
inspiration. 



Two plays were given before Christmas, illustrating the mod- 
ern stage, "Rosalind," by I. M. Barrie, and "A Pot of Broth," 
by W. B. Yates. 

The Alumnae Night this year was particularly successful — 
a play forming one of the chief features. 

All the meetings have been held in the Union, and although 
it meant crowding at times, it was worth that small incon- 
venience. 

The time-honoured institution of the Literary Society, the 
Autumn Tea. was handed over to a joint committee of the differ- 
ent societies in the College. It was felt that, as it had become an 
inter-society function, it was not fitting that the Literary Society 
bear the whole burden of the expense. 

The results of the short story contest, the title of which was 
"Puppets All," were beyond expectation. 



37 









\ 




Queen's Hall 



38 



Queens Hall 




Queen's Hal 
\\( mis ! 



What a world of meaning lies in those two 



Miss L. Livingstone 



Before coming to college we looked forward with much 
anticipation, and a great deal of awe, to the new life which was 
opening before us. Gradually, as we began to feel ourselves 
members of this Association, we lost this feeling of awe and 
gained in its place one of respect for the institution and that 
for which it stands. 

Here our sense of responsibility is developed by our self- 
government; high and lofty arc our ideals, and dec]) and sincere 
are i mr friendships. 

The war has necessarily curtailed many of our social functions, 
but the most enjoyable still remain, namely: the seniors' initia- 
tion, the Guy Fawkes party, and the seniors' dinner. In place 
of the functions which have been forgone, others of a more 
serious and yet enjoyable nature have been introduced, such as 
our successful shower and tea given in aid of French war suffer- 
ers. Many an otherwise idle hour is employed in knitting and 
other Red Cross work. 

We are very fortunate in having for a Dean one who takes 
such a dee]) and personal interest in the Hall and in its individual 
residents. Being herself a graduate of the University of Toronto, 
Miss Livingstone is in sympathy with the girls in their every 
joy and sorrow. 

Each girl as she enters in her first year finds that within the 
portals of Queen's Hall a warm welcome awaits her. and when 
these portals close behind her for the last time she feels keenly 
the loss of all that she is leaving. 

Girls may come and girls may go, but Queen's Hall will 
continue in spirit at least, and though these walls may crumble, 
others will rise in their place, and so we may truly say, 

"The Form remains, the Function never dies." 



39 




MODERN LANGUAGE CLUB., 1917-18. 

TOP ROW Helen McCrimmon, 2nd Year Representative; Helen Kirkwood, Treasurer; Vida Peene, 2nd Vice-President; Janet Smith, 1st Ytar 

Representative; Heddy Hoffman, Business Manager of Plays. 
BOTTOM ROW Ufreda Elliott, Secretary; Dorothy MacMillan, President; Hi Clawson, Hon. President; Marjorie Muck. 1st Vice-President. 

The Modern Language Club of University College 



The activities of the Modern Language Club began by a tea 

at tlie I 'ni( hi to welcome bark the old members and to extend 
a cordial invitation to the Freshies. Such enthusiasm was 
aroused that the membership list rapidly increased until now it 
numbers seventy-five members. 

The subject lor the year has been "How the Geographical 
Conditions of the Romance Countries Affect the Temperament 
and General Characteristics of Their People." Italy. France, 
Spain and England in its relation to the Continent have been duly 
discussed in interesting papers, and have been supplemented by 
slides, dances in costumes and discussions. Musical selections 
to,, have helped to make the evenings enjoyable. Representa- 
tives from the sister colleges were invited to the English Even- 
ing", which was held at the Union. This year the old idea of hav- 
ing the students read papers has been revived and has proved 



very successful — it has meant the hearty and loyal support ol 
the members to make it so. 

A.S the professors have so kindly continued to offer their 
homes for the meetings the executive has been able to maintain 
the social character of the meetings. It has been very gratifying 
to see so many of the professors showing their interest in the 
Club by attending the meetings. It has been of great benefit to 
the students to meet them socially. 

The Annual French Play was held November 22nd at the 
Academy of Music, 12 Spadina Road, and was very successful. 
'Idie play that was represented was "Les Romanesques," par 
Edmond Rostand. Violin and vocal solos, dances in costume 
and several orchestral selections contributed to making the even 
ing an enjoyable one. The proceeds, which amounted to twenty 
dollars, are to be sent to France in aid of the war sufferers. 



4(1 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE V. W. C. A., 1917-18 

TOP ROW- Margaret Home, Convener of Social Study; Gladys Elliott, Convener of Bible Study; Helen Bryans, 1st Year 
Representative: Margaret Wylie, Convener of Mission Study; Nora Wiley, Student Volunteer Representative; Edith 
Littletield, Membership Convener. 

BOTTOM ROW — Edith Lambert, 2nd Year Representative; (Irace Brodie, Secretary; Helen Smith. President; Willena 
Crawford, Vice-President; Lorina Richardson, Treasurer. 



University College Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 



President Miss Helen Smith Student Volunteer Representative Miss Nora Wiley 

Vice-President .Miss Willena Crawford Membership ( lonvener Miss Edith Littlefield 

Secretary Miss Grace Brodie 

Treasurer Miss Lorina Richardson BlbIe Stu,1 - V ( °nvener Miss Gladys Elliott 

Second Year Representative Miss Edith Lambert Social Study Convener Miss Margaret Home 

First Year Representative Miss Helen Bryans Mission Stud)' Convener M iss Margaret Wylie 

41 




QNIVERSITV COLLEGE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC EXECUTIVE, 1917-18 

TOP ROW Marion Harvey; Marjorie Tolmie, Olga Wallace, Marie Peterkin. 

BOTTOM Ki i\\' — ■< iiai i: Ferguson, Winifred Simpson, Pauline Simpson, Wilma Thompson. 



University College Women's Athletic Association 



Although the number of girls who arc joining the Athletic 
Association is increasing every year, it is hoped that the time 
will conic when every girl will belong. For it is an organization 
that depends entirely on the support the girls give it. and if you 
do not turn out for practice- the teams cannot be expected to 
win. Or if you cannot come to practices, at least come to the 
games and support your own team: it helps a lot. 



Last year I*. C. won the cup for tennis and one of our girls 
came among the first three in the swimming contest. Although 
U. C. did not come first in hockey, a very good showing was 
made. There was a three-cornered tie and I". C. lost to St. 
Hilda's. 

So far this year our teams have not been successful, but we 
hope to make a good showing in hockey and swimming". 



42 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

TENNIS TEAM. 
V. M . < li.inil.ii - 
E. Macphers'on 
M. S. Lewis 
II. C. Schi II 
(I, E. Brown 
E, C. Graham 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOCKEY TEAM. 
Constance Dingle Vera Robinson Jean Bryce Violet Carrie Dorothy Meadows Winnifred Simpson Marion Harvey 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
BASKETBALL TEAM. 1917-18. 
Margaret Wylie 
Claire Millar 
Marjoi ie Tennant 
Wilma Thompson 
Irene Stobie 
Margaret McTaggart 




43 




COMMERCE AND FINANCE CLUB. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 1917-18. 

21; P. T. Clark. '21; W. C. McTavish, 



'20 : 



A. L. 



TOP ROW— W. Cohen. 'JO: IT. O. Hull, '19; W. L. Turnbull, 

Woodland, '21: E. R. Sheppard, '21; G. R. F. Troop, '20. 
BOTTOM ROW I) B. Hall. '21; J. H. Ratcliffe, '19. Secretary; F. J. Horning, '18, President; Prof. M. A. Mackenzie, 

lion. President; R. W. Wilkinson, '18, Vice-President; R. B. West, '20, Treasurer; G. D. Little. '2U 



44 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SOCIETY, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW — IT. R. Foreman, 4tli Year Representative; E. O. Hall, Secretary-Treasurer; D. F. Shugart, 1st Year Representa- 
tive; W. S. Vaughan, 2nd Year Representative. 

BOTTOM ROW -Miss IT C. Millar, Corresponding Secretary; X. E. Sheppard, President; Dr. John Satterly, Hon. President; 
W. \V. Shaver, Vice-President; Miss M. M. Stephens, 3rd Year Representative. 



45 




UNIVERSITY COLLEGE V. M. C. 



A. EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 



,,,,. ROW-R. R. Conner, Convene,- Soeial Service; I. McEown, Convener Prayer Groups; < B 
,!. Conference Pr tar; E O. Twiss, Secretary; F. C. Hastings Convener B.Ue Stt* 

BOTTOM ROW-J. J Robins, 2nd Viee-P lent; Prof. W. R Taylor, Ph.D., Hon Present , J 

T s Bole, 1st Vice-President; D. O. Arnold. B.A., General Secretary 



Weir, Treasurer; C. II- 
Bacon Brodie, President; 



•40 



To the Graduating Class of Victoria College 



B^p Chancellor Bowles. 




Chancellor Bowles 



The greatest treasure 
\ ictoria College possesses is 
the love and confidence of 
those who go forth from her 
halls to live their lives in the 
service of the truths and 
ideals received in their col- 
lege training. It were a 
strange thing indeed did 
students leave their Alma 
Mater and east no "longing, 
lingering look behind." 
There is no more blessed life 
than college life. Its pursuit 
of knowledge (the phrase is 
now old fashioned, almost 
obsolete), its preparation for 
the great work of life, 
its associations, inspirations 
and friendships, ' its tradi- 
tional sentiments, all eon- 
spire to raise it to a place of 
its own. The loyalty and 
devotion of the graduates 
every college looks for as a 
part of its exceeding great 
reward. The class now go- 



ing forth from Victoria — the sixty-eighth in her history. I 
believe — will not fail to tell the praises of their Alma Mater, 
and that not in words only, but in the spirit of their lives ami 
the purposes to which they give themselves. 

It will be expected of you that you till a good place in the 
community. To live secluded, selfish, narrow lives, after sharing 
in the broader outlooks which are given to University men and 
women, would be anomalous indeed. So to:, would it be to be 
insincere and unreal after years of training of the mind in a 
search for truth and reality. In addition to the acquirement of 
a certain amount of technical and other sorts of knowledge 
Victoria cherishes a well-founded hope that her graduates will 
have attained the simplicity of sincerity and the largeness ol 
an intelligent and sympathetic relationship with the greater 
causes and interests of humanity. 

To bid you, on behalf of your College, farewell brings a feel- 
ing compounded of pleasure and pain — pleasure that your course 
is now happily completed and a goal you have striven toward 
reached, pain that happy associations are about to terminate — 
a deeper pain that so many brave young men who had hoped to 
be counted with you have answered a sterner summons and now 
are fighting their country's battles or are numbered among our 
sainted dead, whose names when the war is over will be written 
in a record of imperishable honour. 

May you who go forth this year be stronger to endure and 
conquer in your life struggle because of those of your classmates 
who already in the great cause have endured unto the end. 



48 



Jin ilUmoriam 




J. M. AVLWARD 
Died at his home at Oueensville. 
July 20, 1915. 



SPR. H. S. DOWSON SPR. C. F. PATTERSON 

Div. Signallers. Killed in action, Div. Signal Co. Killed at Pass- 

July 31, 1917. chendaele. 




PTE. R. D. POAST 
4th Univ. Co., PP.C.L.I. Killed 
in action. 



SGT. T V. SPARLING PTE. K. \Y. WHITE 

Jn.l Battery, C.F.A. Killed in ('an. Inf. Died of wounds, Oct. 

action, Oct. 30, 1917. . 31, 1916. 



'"] In se laid the world away : poured the red 
Sweet wine of youth: gave up the years to be 
i)( work ;n,| joy, and that unhoped serene 
I hat nun call age." 



4(1 



.**«B 




Victoria College 



50 



■ ■ggpgfm- i s 






AUSTIN. MARY E. 

"Is she n, ii pure gold?" 

Pressed for time to attend lectures, Mary 
has been able to efficiently preside over the 
Patriotic Tea-room and organize the Social 
Service work of the "Y" with enthusiasm. 
In spite of a loving regard for her own opin- 
ion, her true-blue qualities and charm of man- 
ner have won for her many loval friends. 



BINKLEY. HAROLD C. 

"Even though vanquished, he could argue still." 

Calgary found a tiny place for "Hal" Febru- 
ary 2, '97; Hamilton, a larger; then Vic. 
claimed his executive ability for Lit and Acta. 
A dash of spunk and an air of finality presage 
his further success. 



BLATCHFORD, DOUGLAS H. 
"/ love my songs." 

After a checkered career as a student at 
Essex and Clinton Collegians, and as a 
teacher, "Doug." came to Vic. in '14. 

Understands baseball, football, hockey, ten- 
nis, chess, checkers and marbles, but cannot 
play them. 

Much sought after by both ladies and gentle- 
men. 



BREARLEY. EARL W. 

"Reading maketh a full man, conference a 
ready man, an, I writing an exact man." 
"I've lived an, I loved.'i 

Horn in Brantford, 1891. Spent boyhood 
on the farm, youth in business. Abandoned 
this to prepare for larger service. Matric. 

W Istock College, 1913. Established his 

home in Toronto and entered Victoria in 1914. 
The ministry will claim his attention after 
graduation. 






BROWN, B. IRENE 



"I" is fo 
"R" is For 

"E" is for 
"\" i- for 
"K" is for 

keen : 
Put it all together, there's Irene. 



the imp that sparkles in her eye 
her readiness for fun : 

her energy in learning to make pie, 
the (k)nitting she has done, 
Elgin House for which she's very 



BROWN, GEORGIA 

"Serene and resolute and still, 

. I n,l calm a n,l self-possessed." 

Ceorgia is a faithful student, and possesses 
a kindly disposition, also a generous amount 
of good sense. She is highly esteened by 
her friends for her constancy and depth of 
character. 



CLEAVER. HAZEL J. 
"For every wherefort 



COOK, WILLIAM A. 



she has a why. 



When not busy cooking, Hazel has been 
engaged in many College activities. Her last 
year she made a tactful and just head of tin 
Hall. Hut all her duties did nut prevent hei 
having time to read, think, and cultivate true 
friendships. 



" Wvselj 
Doctor 

"Benei 
[eat ning. 

I egi .en 
mien isco 



when young , 
an,l Saint an, I 

lick the tnarri 

Brantford 
1 Victoria fa 

pie still. 
"And what is 
Wotdd it we 



eager 

rd ,n 



:,\ man" 
Collegiate 
nned tin 

writ is 

won In 



ly fret] n,' n/ 
'eal argument." 

Aspired to 

•. Albert ( ol 

spark. "I'is 

H i il 



.ll 



- : ^_ 










CROCKER. KENNETH J. 

"Ha veil met.' 

Buck 'I over the birth line December 14th, 
Matriculated Parkdale, 1912 Entered 
Victoria, Class 'I", good sport; year man; 
jovial. Enlisted 'IS; France 1916 to I/: re- 
turned '17 Ken. will continu< to "buck and 
fight" in the domain of law. 



DUNDAS, A. MARION 

"Friendship indeed was written not m words 
.Iml with the heart, not pen." 

Marion hails from Peterborough. Quiet, 
she refuses t<> be a "lime-lighter": kind-heart- 
ed, affectionate, generous, sin- is a born lubri- 
cant, cherishing the belief that 

"All that repays for the strife of life, 
fs helping some soul in trouble." 



DYKE. EDYTH M. 

"Thy wit is as quick as the greyhound's 
mouth -it catches." — Shakespeare. 

"Dykie" never had to wait until the next 
day to think of a "come back." All through 
her Collegi course she hail all that she prized, 
laughter and thought and friends, in plenty 



FLANDERS, BEATRICE 

"So strive to seek, to find, and not to yield." 

Taking Honour Manic, at London, Beatrice 
came to Vic. to swell the numbers of ITS. 
Leader of thi Government, Secretary of De- 
bating Union, a member of both Choral Club 
and Dramatic Society, she has alsi 

i ' ollege teams and won her "T" — what 

ill on ask of the girl ! 




FRID. ROY W. 

"Full well Ik h coun tei • ■ < i .,.,-. 

ihs coursi Ins been irn pri ssibh . lefl 
handed, and triumphant ever since its incep- 
i ion, I laniilti.ii. ( Ictobei 18th, 1893. With 
most College honours, from scrap-leaderships 
in Hebrew prizes, a man popular with pro- 
taii 



GALE. OLIVE 

"The desire of the moth for the slur, 
i •• the night fot the morrow, 
The devotion to something afar 
From the sphere of out sot row 

A small person, known and yel unknown; a 
fighter against circumstances. COUrageouslj 
fashioning life to ideals and not ideals to life. 



GREENAWAY, C. R. 

"A i hiel's amang you tabin' «i >tes 
. Ind, faith, he'll prent it." 

Roy is well known for his excellent work 
with Acta, in "Locals," and as Editor-in- 
Chief. Attended Oakwood Collegiate; Honout 
Matriculation. 1913; English and History 

1 Minis.). 

Says, like Mantilini. 

"Mj life is one dem'd hot t id gt ind !" 



HALFYARD. LEVI 

"Tell truth, and shame the 

Enthusiastic in moral causes, 
spirited as the brei es of his 

fcumillanil. "L< n" has bj ■ 
Theologj fitted himself foi his 
"fisher of nun." 



devil." 

vi\ acious and 

native N'rw- 
s in Arts ami 
ife-work' as a 



52 



HENRY. MAMIE E. 
"What's the us 



oj zvoi rying?" 



First saw the light of day in Thornton. 
Matriculated from Harbord, 1913, ami came 
to "Vic." with class '18. Infected with a 
sunny smile and Irish wit, Mamie has become 
a general favourite. 



JEFFS 
"1 



EULALIE L. M. 
from haunts of 



ome from haunts <>l 'coo and hen. 
1 make a sudden sally. 
To grasp with glee my fountain pen, 
And round professors rally." 

The Household Science course is a good 
field for the exercise of Eulalie's practical 
mind. Her work is always well-done, but 
^lu-'s ever ready for fun. 



JOHNSON, ROY GARDINER 

'Tis time, I think, to trudge, pat I: and 

begone " 

With Paradise dissatisfied 

He sought the West, more stirring; 

Hut there for higher learning sighed. 

Ami to the East returning 

II s days he spent with Hobbes and Locke 

Ills nights in social talk 



LANG. ROSS S. 

"His heart was in Ins work, 
hi, l tin- heart giveth grace in every art." 

First gi i .ii i \ ™i Km bj . On! Eai Ij edu- 
cation at Newcastle and Bowmanville. Vic- 
toria 1T8, P. and I'... prominent in Athletics, 
holder of Athletic stick, member of Class 
Exec, Tennis Rep. Medicine is Ross' ambi- 
tion. A brilliant future awaits him. 



s «g» 



m 






LONGWORTHY. EDITH M. 

"Ever able to serve a friend 

And noble enough to conceal it." 

Edith Longworthy came from the West, 

ts, Lit.. Y, she went into with zist, 
At last in old Vic. 
She became Senior Stick. 
The future will tell us the rest. 
Moderns 'IS. 



McCONNELL. VON 

Recit. (Solo): 

Nights of mirth : 

Sad awakenings 

Long' after the roll-call. 

To-night the rink, a magazine 

Full of little mottoes for my wall — 

Dr, Goethe, lying dusty and forsaken 7 



Mcdonald Florence c. 

"Out where the sun shines a little brighter, 
Out where the hand clasps a little lighter . 
That's where the West beams 

A loyal daughter of the West, and Prince 
Albert in particular. Shy and retiring at 
first, she has proved a jolly comrade and true. 
She found time from her pursuit of House- 
hold Science to plav on the Basketball Team 
in '16. 



McFARLANE. RUTH 

"A fire's in the heart oj me." 

A Westerner, full of life and ambition; 

A rebel, hating non-essentials ; 

A philosopher, seeking to prove the un- 

ln i ivable : 
A friend, steel true. 

Add to this enthusiasm, strength, couragi 
and it is Ruth. 



53 



MARTIN. CAROLINE J. 

"Keep on the sun n v side." 

< ami' i- a g I sport, capable of doing 

things and discussing anything from politics 
to Presbyterianism She never worries <>i 
labours and comes right side oul everj time. 
' I luck to her. 



MORRIS. NELSON D. 

"He is what you behold him, and his doom 
Depends upon his deeds/ 1 

Nels. entered Vic. with 1T7, but seeing the 
mill of good men in 1T8, he decided to help 
them out. From Biology he transferred to B. 
& P., where, as a scientist. In has already 
earned the title of "la creme de la creme." 



MYERS. EVA 

"Her heart was in her work." 

Eva is endowed with two noble desires, 
viz.: to acquire knowledge, and secondly, to 

impart it. Her teaching ability has been much 
appreciated in the Western pi evinces. At 
Victoria, she has astonished her class-mates 
by her thorough originality and unique logic. 



PEARSON. FLORENCE E. 

"Exceeding wise, fair-spoken and persuading. 

From the Manitoulin Island 

tame this cheery northern maiden, 

lame to Vic, which gave her knowledge, 

Came with snowshoes, skates and racket. 

Every ready with assistance 

In the Lit. and Y and Tea-room. 

Tho' her work she ne'er neglected, 

She was always helping others 




PEARSON, LIDA B. 

"/ am resolved to grow fat and look young 

'lit forty." 

Duth Lida lias been a "live 



From < .irly 

and In i '>: iginality ami em i g j 
always b< en ai tin disposal of othi i s. 
Milrs her class and College work, she is 
President of University Athletics ll>i pari 
moments an occupied by "Lit.," Athletics 
ami a little human ini ursi 



PFEFFER. J. MILTON 

'Desiring /his 
With what I 



man's art and lhai man's scope 
most enjoy content at least." 



March 29th, 1892. 

have 1918. 

lie- should speak truly 
hi the wicked." 



"Anil now am 1 , 

lint little better 



if a man 
than one 



ROACH. EDITH E. 

"The reason firm, the temperate will, 
Endurance, foresight, strength, mi, I skill." 

Edith has all these, combining to make up 
a good student, jolly comrade and loyal 
friend. A varied school career, larvis Col 
legiate. and "Moderns," lias been her history. 



ST. JOHN. HELEN B. 

We mention not the honours twain 
Her class on her conferred, 

For bouquets always gave a pain 
Ami brick-bats were preferred. 

And tho' she used to spiel at Lit. 

And dabble in the arts Dramatic, 
She only tried to do her bit, 

A super's part a gent rheumatic. 
Moderns 'IS. 



54 






SACKETT. JULIA 

"Tlu' gentlest flowers thai grow 
May hold communion with the rocks below." 

Julie is a loyal daughter of U.S.A., but has 
lived many years in Canada. From Prescott 
she came to Vic, to be eagerly welcomed 
by ITS. Y.W.C.A., Students' Council and 
Acta have profited by her labours. Her ready 
wit does not preclude serious thought. 



SHAVER. LILIAN 

". liry. fairy, Lilian , 
Flitting, fairy Lilian." 
In Lilian's calendar there are no dark days, 
for she carries with her the radiance of a 
sunny smile and a cheerful spirit. Into her 
work and play she throws her boundless fund 
of enthusiasm and humour. Household Sci- 
ence is the most fitting sphere for (her en- 
thusiasm)?, her optimism and her winsome, 
womanly charm. Future success seems as- 
sured — "'She has a way." 



SHEPPARD. NORRIS E. 

"A little woolly, hat not all slurp." 

The (N-f-l)th problem for humanity — 
what will be the future of July 20th 189, 
Helpful hints — Educated in Hamilton ; Senior 
Matric, 1914; M. & I'. Scholarships, 1916- 
17; Opposition Leader, I' l.s : Member of 
Class Exec.: ..M. & 1'. Societj Pres. Ath- 
letics -The "joker" with kings and queens. 
Solution — "Future bright, the past all under- 
stood." 



SMITH. DORA V. 

".Lie cannot wither, nor custom stale, her 
infinite vai 

One of Dora's main assets is her sunny 
smile. Her pet aversion is Latin. She plays 
tennis, hockey and swims well After mid- 
night she can write very acceptable sioiic^ 
and articles. 




SMITH. ROSCOE H. 

"The force oj Ins own merit makes Ins way." 

A son of the parsonage and a matriculant 
of Simcoe High School. IK- likes such a 
variety as Orientals, Political Science and 
General Course. His ambition is towards 
Pulpit Gymnastics. 



SPARLING. HELEN J. 

"/ always said yon hail a 
yon hare a spice of the de 
tion." 



nl heart, 
in your 



though 
disposi- 



Helen will return to Pembroke with "small 
Latin and less Greek," but an overwhelming 
knowdedge of tennis, hockey, feeds, ami Pa- 
triotic tea-rooms. 



SPARLING. VERA O. 

"Stern is her air, hat gentle is her heart." 
A strong personality ami the qualities of 
leadership have enabled Vera to meet the 
responsibilities of office as President of the 
University Women's Administrative Council 
and also of the Victoria Students' Council. 
Combined with this, an understanding sym- 
pathy has won for her the admiration of many 
and has endeared her to those who know her 
best. Course- Honour Household Science. 



STEVENSON. ARTHUR B. 

"Pursues the even tenor of his 

August 5, 1898, ushered him into 
age near Lake Nipissing. Renfrew 
angeville Collegiates prepared him fo 
Treasurer U.L.S. 1916, member of 
and Athletic Executives. Graduate 
P. before 20th birthday. Enlisted 
Signallers May. I'M;, VICTORIA. 



way. 

a parson - 

and < >r- 

r ( !olli ge. 

V M.C.A. 

in M. X 
Divisional 



55 



STRANGWAYS. RUTH 



To strive, to seek 



Hrong i 
to find and not to yield." 



Such was ill. ambition that led Ruth from 

Alberl College to the halls of Victoria where 

her bright nature and varied talents promise 
for In i a success ml futui e. 



TALBOT. MARGERY F. 

"She has wit 'in,! song and sense. 
Mirth anil sport and eloquence." 

After London Collegiate and Western Uni- 
versity "Marge" entered Vic as a Fresh- 
Soph. Displaying her many talents in many 
ways, she played leading roles in "Every 
woman," 'The Rivals" and "Overtones," 
while the appreciation of her musical talents 
was shown by her Presidency of the Choral 
Club. 



TICKELL. JOSEPHINE 

"Still rivers run deep. 



WALKER. MAY 



"A smooth 

.. - Gentle thought ires." 

Neither whirlpools or rapids characterize 

Josephine, but beneath a calm exterior moves A modest little prairie anemone, May felt 

the forceful undercurrent of grit and under- the breezes of Saskatchewan in her b'ab 

standing which means depth. Belleville High Oakwood Collegiate and Victoria ( ollege have 

School and Victoria College will never blush "done their bit" t.. fit her of use- 

for her. fulni ss 









WATSON. EULALIE E. 

"She taketh delight in Houselwld Science. 
She is leai cook f 01 two." 

I.. .1 certain amount of reserve add a 

double quantitj of g I nature. This blended 

willingness 1.. help an. I seasoned with 

:. piii. li ..I pep" gn - 11- Eulalie ;i . om 
1 1l1.1t has pn ived \ 1 ri appetizing 1 " 



WATT, GRACE A. 

"Let Iter speak and whate'er she say 
Methinks J should love Iter nil the more." 

Graduating from Yale II. S., Mich.. Grace 
became popular at Vic, because of her enthu- 
siastic support, first, of Athletics making the 
Basketball Team. '16. Then in 'is -In was 
ident of the Dramatic Club, which was 
organized through her efforts. 



WHITE. J. ERNEST 



'His fle 



is while as snow.' 



Orangeville saw the genesis of his career 
lie absorbed all the intellectual culture public 
schools and collegiates could give and came 
to "Vic," entiling the M. and I', course. 
Class Executives and the Students' Council 
In has served well. He was called to the 
Presidency of the M. and P. Society, and 
of the (lass, but the call overseas was louder. 
"Every lassie loves a soldier!" 



WINTER. ANNA E. 

"Dere's not many tings dat girl won't do." 

From tin' famous Gait Collegiate, Ann 
came to Vic. with her pluck, ability and 
readiness to see the rift in every cloud. In 
Household Science, as "Wealth" in "Every- 
woman" and President of Y.W.C.A. she has 
proved herself an all-round girl and a true 
friend. 



56 




Annesley Hall 



Class 1918 History — Victoria College 



Y"oung ITS came tumbling into the lap of its Alma Mater 
with a lust) yell in the fag vnd of September, 1 ( '14 — as fine an 
offspring as maternal heart could desire. Like all babies, its bead 
was large, oul of proportion. Bui in a week it bad its eyes open, 
and from that time its course has been triumphant. Every class 
in the history of University life has claimed supremacy for itself; 
ITS lias in every encounter irresistibly, incontrovertiblv and 
irretrievably "licked the other fellow," and has passed through 
Victoria consuming all before it. 

In many things we were no exceptional class. Our first yell 
was long enough to tax the capacity of a Zeppelin. Our first 
president undoubtedly wrote home to acquaint his relatives of 
his appointment, with scarcely less dignified pleasure than if he 
had refused the chancellorship of the College purely upon prin- 
ciple. We had hikes, and enjoyed them in true college fashion; 
and skating parties which hardly depended even on the weather 
for their success. We were not 

"Too bright i ir g< >od 
For human nature's daily food." 

( >ur position is unique among the classes of Victoria. A 
strange destiny has placed us in such a position that we have 
received the full sweep of widely changing conditions. We 
entered just at the outset n\ the war. Conditions were normal; 
lew considered the prospect serious. We alone of all the classes 
graduating From Victoria have run the whole gamut from a 
Hourishing, happy, freshman year to a sober and decimated group 



of seniors. Our numbers in 1914 were 140. of whom ( >? were 
men, 45 women. The fall of 1915 found 96 sophomores back in 
college halls, with nearly as many women as men. The call of 
the war became so strong that our third year had only 2? men 
and, for perhaps the first time in Victoria's history, the girls of 
the class outnumbered the men. There were 33. Now then' are 
46 of us to emerge among the elect and carry through life a 
university degree; and 15 of us are men and 31 of us were very 
exacting upon the photographer. 

But in spite of such disintegration we have been able to retain 
our identity. The personality of our class is bound to remain 
with the memory ol the deeds ol prowess of our male members 
and the originality and enthusiasm of the others. During our 
third year the women of the class presented the drama "Every- 
woman" to two large audiences. They earned real praise, while 
accomplishing something of monetary value. 

Whether we fully appreciate our national position as we 
leave these balls is a matter for each of ns individually to decide. 
In the face of our depleted numbers we are forced to consider 
facts that cry aloud. Our heads bow at the memory and mention 
of C. E. Patterson. II. S. Dowson, R. I. Poast, T. V. Sparling' and 
W. K. White — all members of our year, who have added an 
eternal sanctity to out halls by the noble sacrifice of their lives 
for a cause which we believe to be just and righteous. 

Others are willing to do as much, if necessary. Their names 
1 1 dlow : 



A. 


M. 


Austin 


R. 


T. Chapin 


1. 


W. 


\ustin 


J. 


1 1. Creighton 


E. 


A. 


Blatchford 


P. 


II. Callaway 


( ,. 


E. 


Botl 


R. 


M. ( reiger 


( ,. 


(,. 


1 !n >\\ n 


W 


. If. Goodman 


R. 


C. 


( "alder 


R. 


S. 1 fosking 


X 


1). 


Clarke 


R. 


I. Irwin 



I-". C. Jennings 
A. C. ("ourclan 

I. II. Kerr 
W. W. Lang 

II. I). Langford 
W. F. Langford 
I). Maclean 



I. C. Marritt 
R. H. Massey 
E. R. Mav 

I). W. McKenzie 

II. < i. Mingay 
R. J. Xeelands 
W.'C. Noble 



II. 


A. 


Oaks 


II. M. Smith 


A. 


E. 


C. Pentland 


I. L. Smith 


J.' 


T. 


Phillips 


A. B. Stevenson 


W 


. R 


. Ririe 


A. W. Switzer 


M. 


R. 


R( ibinsi hi 


R. Weldon 


R. 


W 


. Ryan 


1. E. White 



58 




VICTORIA COLLEGE FOURTH YEAR EXECUTIVE, FALL TERM. 1917-18. 

TOP ROW II. c. Binkley, Historian; Miss E. M. Dyke, Poetess; R. S. Lang, Athletic Slick; Miss D. V. Smith, Prophetess; C. R. G awaj 

Prophet; Miss I-; I.. .\|. J e flfs, Pianist. 
BOTTOM ROW X. E. Sheppard, 2nd Vice-President; Miss E. M Longworthy, Senior Stick; Dr. Pelham Edgar, Hon. President; Miss II [J. 

St. John, 1st Vice-President; D. H. Blatchford, President; Miss A, M, Dundas, Treasurer. 
ABSENT II. M. Smith, Senior Stick: Miss J. ('. Sackett, Lady Historian. 




VICTORIA COLLEGE THIRD YEAR EXECUTIVE. FALL TERM. 1917-18. 

TOP ROW Miss F. A. Smith. Lady Historian; Miss K. I. St. John, Poetess: D. M. Stinson, Secretary; S. A Moote, Pott; Miss A. II. Snider, 
Pianist; L. C. Harvey. Historian. 

BOTTOM ROW— H. O. Bull, President; Miss E. Gibbard, Treasurer; Prof. X. W. DeWitt, Hon. President; Miss B. TT. Stewart. 1st Vice-Presi- 
dent: W. G. Scott, 2nd Vice-President. 

5;> 




VICTORIA COLLEGE FIRST YEAR EXECUTIVE, FALL TERM, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW — A. S. Roseborough, Historian; W. R. Patterson, Treasurer: Prof. A. L. Langford. Hon. President; F. R. Murgatroyd Poet; C. II. 

Dickinson, 2nd Vice-President; \Y. (i. Graydon, President. 
BOTTOM ROW -Miss J. C. Davidson, Poetess; Miss N. E. Lovejoy, Lady Histprian ; Mi-^ G L. Rutherford 1st Vice-President; Miss E. \l. 

Ryan, Secretary; Miss i. K. Balfour, Pianist. 



6(1 




VICTORIA COLLEGE WOMEN'S STUDENT'S COUNCIL, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW Miss M. Howitt, Miss E. Calloway, Miss F. Ribey, Miss B. Agar. 

BOTTOM ROW Miss H. Stewart: Mi-s K. St. John, Secretary; Miss V. SjJarling, President; Miss H Cleaver. 




VICTORIA COLLEGE V W. C. A. CABINET, 1917-18. 

lop ROW F. Pearson, M. Austin, R. Lawson, E. Watson, E. Longworthy. A. Graham, II. Stewart. 

BOTTOM ROW- E. Jeffs, 1. Brown, A. Winter; Mrs. Ford. Hon. President; C. Kilborn. Vice-President; .1. Odell, Secretary; A. Brown, Treas, 



i.l 




EXECUTIVE OF THE VICTORIA COLLEGE WOMEN'S LITERARY SOCIETY, 1917-18. 

Till' ROW Miss 1). Colbeck, Miss G. Fife, Miss M. E. Austin. Miss L. J. Tickell, Miss M. Thornton, Miss A. Graham, Miss .1 O. Smith Miss 

V Brown. 
BOTTOM R(>\V -Miss M Smith. Miss H. Sheridan, Miss A. I'.. Flanders, Miss R. McFarlane; Miss i:. J. Corrigan, B.A., Hon. President; Miss 

E. E. Watson, Miss II, Carthy, Miss E. M. Dyke. 




EXECUTIVE OF VICTORIA WOMEN'S DRAMATIC CLUB, 191MS. 

G Davidson Isl Year Representative; Miss E. Fisher, Convener of Stage Committee; Miss E, Sterling, Secretarj . Miss i. A. Watt. Presi- 
dent; Pelham Edgat Ph.D., Hon. President; Miss C. I-".. Kilborn, Vice-President; Miss J. Keenleyside, I'reasurer; Miss n \\ Smith, Busi- 
ness Manager; Miss M Smith. Convener of Costume Committee. »,£ •*,' * 



ti2 




VICTORIA COLLEGE LADIES' CHORAL CLUB EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

Miss T. Edgington, Reporter; Miss M. Talbot; President; Miss G. Rutherford, Librarian; Mis- IT. C. Parlow, I'.. A.. Hon. President; Miss I'. 
Galloway, Treasurer; Mis- j. Odell, Vice-President; Miss I',. Flanders, Secretary. 




EXECUTIVE ()F VICTORIA COLLEGE ATHLETIC CLUB, 19 1 7-1 S. 

TOP ROW L. Eollick, 1st Year Representative; M. Myers, Tennis Captain; B. Flanders, Swimming Captain; ('. E. Kilborn, Dasketball Captain: 

R. Hilliard, 2nd Year Representative; .1. Smith, Hockey Captain 

BOTTOM R< >\V (1. Watt. 4th Year Representative; X. Evans, Secretary-Treasurer; A. Hamill, B.A., Hon. President; L. Pearson, President 

A. Snider, 3rd Year Representative. 



63 



VICTORIA COLLEG1 
I \DII - I: VSKE I B M.I 
TEAM, 1917-18. 

M. J. K. Edgingt' 
F. E Snider, 

I I kill. mil. 
\. I!. Flan 1 

J. O. Smith, 
c \ Kilbo 



k) 0mfl W** *~2 *^*xl 




K^.. ^^B ^^^^^ 


%** ^^5 


fiPf ^R* s * 




K=HyTB 


r 4v^B 


I j L rL i c& 


i | 






1 L' 'lA i 


(• 


£*&*£*;! 






VICTORIA COLLEGE 
LADIES' TENNIS 
TEAM, 1917-18. 

M. R. Mi rs, 
A. 1). Jenner, 
l>. \*. Smith, 
A. B. Flanders, 
J. O. Smith, 
M. M. Hewson. 



\ M "I ( IRIA (' ILLEGE 

I. Mil ES' Mm KEY 
TEAM. 

I Smith, I loal : 

i I' 1 .ii -•hi. Left \\ ing i ( laptain) : 

.1. Edgington, Rover; 

A. I [ammil, Right Wing : 

I'. Flanders, Lefl Defence; 

Z. Knechtel, Right Defence ; 

II - i mi-;. Centre : 
D. Smith, Span 




64 




ACTA VICTORIAN \ HOARD, 1917-18 

TOP ROW X. 1-:. Sheppard, 'is. •■Scientific"; D. M. Stinson, '\'>. "Personals and Exchanges"; S. A. Mootc, '19, "Locals" 

F. ('. Jennings, '19, "Literary"; W. H. ISouck, '19, "Circulation Manager." 
BOTTOM ROW II. C. liinkley, 'is, "business Manager"; M : ss G. M. Fife, '19, "Locals"; Prof. C. E. Auger. "Advisory" 

Dr. (1. L. Locke, "Advisory"; Miss L. J. Tickell, MS. "Literary"; C. R. Creenaway, 'is. "Editor-in-Chief." 
ABSENT Miss .1. O. Smith, '19, -Athletics": A. McGowan, '19, "Athletics"; ( .. W Moore, "Missionary and Religious.' 



65 




VICTORIA COLLEGE MEN'S STUDENTS' COUNCIL, 1917-18. 
\. McGowan, li ] Bentley, B.A.; E. W. Brearley, President; R. G. Johnson; L. C. White, Treasurer; W. J. II. Smyth, Secretary. 




VICTORIA ATHLETIC EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW W. .1. Little, B.A., Grads. Representative; R B. Horwood, '20, Handball Representative; \\ R. F. Luki 

Hockey Representative; I). W. Duggan, '21, 1st Year Representative; A. VtacGowan, Soccei Representative 
BOTTOM ROW S \. Moote, '19, 1st Vice-President; R. W. Frid, '18, President; Prof. S. II Hooke, MA. Hon. President; 

H. (). Bull, '19, Secretary; R. S. Lang, MS, Athletic Stick. 
VBSEN'l \. I. Spracklin, C. I Representative. 



66 




VICTORIA COLLEGE UNION LITERARY SOCIETY EXECUTIVE \XD CABINET, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW— W. H. P.ouck, '19. Minister of Interior; L. W. Rentner, '19, Food Controller; L. Halfyard, '18, Minister o 

Debates; (",. C. McVitty, '21, Minister of Munitions; F. R. Murgatroyd, '21, Asst. Pianist; M. J. Ayearst, '21, Asst 

Secretary. 
MIDDLE ROW— J. M Pfeeffer, '18, Minister of Programs; S. F. Maine. B.A., Minister of Foreign Affairs; R. A. Blackburn 

C.T., Pianist; C. A Jay, '18, Postmaster-General; R. G. Johnson. '18, Asst. Critic; R. W. Frid, '18, Minister oi 

War; W. W. Shaver. '19. Song Leader: W J. Petty, '19, Minister of Publicity: L. ('. White, C.T.. Minister of Trade 

and Commerce. 
BOTTOM ROW A. M. Partridge, B A., Critic; A. McGowan, '19. Minister of Finance; G. W. Moore, C.T., Leader o 

Government: II. C. Binkley, '18, President; L. C. Harvey, '19, Vice-President; N. E. Sheppard, '1*. Leadei 

Opposition ; Victor Johnston '29, Secretary of State. 



07 




V. M. C. A. EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW \V. A. Cook, .1. M. Pfeffer, L. Halfyard, C. A. Jay, L. E. Kilborn, E IT. Walker, A. McGowan. 

i;i'l ni\| R(i\\ R. (|. Johnson; \V. II Bouck, Vice-President; Dr. McLaughlin, Hon. President; E. W. Brearley, President; W. \V. Shaver, 
5< cretarj ; I >. II. Rlatc hford 




COLLEGIANS' DERATING (l.l I; EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 
|(i|' ROW (. II. Dickinson, Isl (..hi,.; I) C. Goldhang, 2nd Cum.: P. R. Murgatroyd, 1st Coun : I.. ( White, Conn. C. T. ; R. \ Blackburn, 

I 'i.i in-! . 

BOTTOM ROW II M. Wright, Secretary; II U Keal President; II C. Binkley, Hon, President; W. .1. G. Graydon, Isl Vic< President; 
\ F. Amu- Trcnsun 



i;s 




6!i 



To the Graduating Class of Trinity College 



B>) Provost Macklem 




Provost Macklem 



The < rraduating i !lass i >1 

1918 is the smallest which 
Trinity ( > illege has known 
in mam years. It numbers 
ek ven v\ i imen and one man. 
Ami if he had been eligible 
for military service overseas, 
there u i mid iv >t be even < me 
male graduate. Is it neces- 
sary to tell in detail the story 
n| the men who are not 
graduating this year, but 
who would have done so 
under normal conditions? 
They have won their place 
among the heroes of Canada. 
Some of them wear their 
laurels to-day with befitting 
modesty; others have left 
for their memorial a little 
wooden cross here and there 
in the military burying 
grounds behind the battle 
lines. Some of these men 
had in their college days 
looked forward to serving 
( iod as ministers of the < n >s 



pel, 
in i 
sen 



while others were preparing to serve Him and their country 
ther walks of life. In ways unforeseen all of them have 
ed < iod and country faithfully and well. 



Heroes ol Canada! Such heroes are the most precious pro- 
duct of these years of the fire of war. when the furnace of human 
trial and forging has been heated seven times more than it is 
wont to be heated. They constitute the wealth of personality 
issuing forth from the fires of warfare, even as pure gold issues 
hi mi i he refining furnace. 



Scoffers have declared that morality is a question of latitude; 

and thinking men who are not scoffers have said trulv that the 
Northern races of mankind have developed more- virility and 
nobler characteristics than have the Southern races. The dis- 
cerning historian of Canada in years to come will record three 
stages in the development of Canadians, in the years when the 
moulding forces of this fair young land were forming the char- 
acter by which the name of Canada should go down in history. 
First, the long and hard struggle of the early settlers, when the 
severity of the climate and the colossal task of subduing nature 
to their service produced a virile race characterized by the funda 
mental virtues of truth, purity, honour, and mutual helpfulness. 
Later, a stage when true progress was halted 1>v abounding pros- 
perity and increasing wealth; when deterioration set in with the 
growth of luxury and the selfish pursuit of personal aggran- 
dizement. And after that, the period ushered in by the world 
war of l'*14. when the cry of the Mother Land, ringing like a 
tocsin through all her dominions overseas, and the voice of God 
in the souls of men reverberating through the changed atmo- 
sphere of unselfish pursuit and high endeavour, roused the youth 
of Canada to a nobility which this generation had not known 
before, and to a life of service worthy of the grandsires who 
begot them and of the women who bore them. 

War may be hell, as it has been called: but even hell on earth 
(which is the only hell we know well enough to dogmatize 
about ) becomes heaven's opportunity sometimes. And truly the 
hell of Ypres and Langemarck. of Courcelette and Festubert, of 
Passchendaele and Vimv Ridge proved the birthplace of these 
heroes of ours, who showed themselves, as they faced that hell. 
worthy to be called sons of * >"d and defenders of the kingdom of 
heaven. 

Some of these heroes are the men who would have been' 
numbered on the roll of graduates of Trinity College in 1918. 
Let us pay them the honour which is their due; our tribute of 
admiration and gratitude; and let those of us who remain at 
home see to it that our Colleges and Universities in the years i" 
come are worth v of these hero-sons. 



70 



Jin Ulemnriam 




ERIC MOSSOM BOYD 
Entered Trinity with Class of MS. 
Died at Bobcaygeon, Oct. 13, 

1917. 



PAUL BROOKS CLARKE 
Lieut, with 124th Bn., Canadian 
Pioneers. Died in France, Oct. 
28, 1917. 



HENRY RICHARD THOMSON 
Lieut, with 58th Bn., C.E.F. Died 

of wounds received in action in 

Flanders, Oct. 25, 1917. 



71 



The Book of the Acts of ' I 8 



Now n came to pass in the year 1914 great trouble came upon 
Trinity and an appeal was scut unto all the land. 

\nd lo, there rani'.' men From the East, from the West, from 
the North, and from the Si mth. 

Such a mighty host was nol seen since the College was 
founded. Men there were ol talent, students, athletes; yea, and 
mighty men < >f valour. 

And it came to pass that when old Trinity saw this might} 
host advancing, great was the joy thereof. Verily the Dean and 
the Provost received them with open arms. 

But when they were all settled in the Jag House there anise 
revolts and rumours of revolts. 

Now the Mead of the Second Year was a stern man. and 
when he looked and saw some worms that were unruly he said, 
"I will crush, 1 will subdue, I will destroy." 

And he sent and had brought In him the I lead of the First 
Year, and these are the words which he spake unto him: 

"Now, <>h thou Tapeworm, prepare, prepare to meet tin doom. 
l!\ reason of the great folly, boldness and conceit of some worms 
the greal and terrible anger of the Second Year will be visited 
upon you to-morrow night, and you shall be punished for the 
ways wherein you have transgressed. 

"Thou shah go down to Sheol. There shall be weeping and 
wailing and gnashing of teeth. Prepare ye, prepare ye, to meet 
vi >ur d< ii mi." 

Such was the message of the Second Year to the First Year. 

Now it happened that the Dean of Arts was an austere man 
and would not listen to the supplications of the freshmen to be 
allowed out to go to the place, the place appointed as a place of 
meeting. To all their entreaties he turned a deaf ear and he 
commanded that the door of the Jag be locked. 

But a great determination took possession of the freshmen 
and. like St. Paul, they were let down through a window. 

And when they had got down through the window they were 
met by the Second Year and were taken to the place appointed 
as a place of meeting, to the Valley of Dry Hones. 

\nd such things happened as is not lawful for man to write 
about, hnt the memory of which remaineth unto this day. 

\nd it also happened that a short time afterwards, on the 
first day of the week, that all were awakened early in the morn- 
ing hv the breaking of idass and the sound of many bottles. 



Now it came to pass that rumours of all these tumults came 
to tlu- ears of the Dean of Residence. Now the Dean of Resi- 
dence was fat and well-favoured and was also an austere man. 
but mightier than the I 'can of \rts. 

The Dean of Arts lined Dollars, but the Dean of Residence 
fined Tens < if I )ollars. 

And he suit and gathered about him the members of the 
First Year. And there was great fear and trembling among 
them. 

And he spake unto them and said. "What is this thing that 
ye have done? Verily ye are worms and no men. Ye arc- the 
scum of the earth. For these and your many transgressions ye 
shall surely be fined." And it was so. 

And there arose great indignation among the men of the 
First Year, but it availed nothing. 

With many like trials and tribulations the year passed. But it 
was a happy and a memorable one. Such was the opinion of all. 

The great year 'IS was the last to spend the freshman days 
in the historic Jag. 

During that year Mays, Scott-Kerr and (.lark, men of valour. 
hearing the call of duty, girded their loins and went to war. the 
great war beyond the seas. 

And it came to pass that when we returned for our second 
year it was found that our numbers had grown less. 

Brooks, Thompson, Nicholson, Wallace. Sim bad also gone 
to a far country and were soon after followed by < >sborne, Wad 
dington, Wilson. (Sharlesworth. Geddes, McCarter and Musson. 

Moreover, McGarvah and Orechkin did cast longing eyes in 
the University College and did betake themselves thither. In 
which place they remain unto this day. 

Now the ladies of '18 were young, comely and fair to look 
upon and found favour in the eyes of all men. They have dis- 
tinguished themselves in athletic, literary and academic circles. 

The acts of the whole year, both here and overseas, which 
if they were written every one. 1 suppose that even the Library 
itself could not contain the bonks that should he written. 

Now the smile of the Provost and the blessing of the Trinity 
i if i trans be with y< iu all 

"Salute all the saints of the Mouse of St. Hilda. 
Salute every one with a holy kiss." 



72 




Trinity College 



73 



ARMSTRONG. MARGARET K. 

if ten oj 
riends, and to spend your time in G 
out-of-doors." 

I the G neral Course fi " n Cobourg 

C I. Successivel} Business Vlanagei and 

Snl>. Editor of "Chronicle"; Treasurei and 

ni of Athletics. National Service 

work ' in 1917. 



CROSSLEY, KATHLEEN 

"Toil unsevered from tranquility." 

Received her earlier training in England. 

II ur Course in Mathematics and Physic 

Mead of Tennis .'nl and 4ih years. Vice- 
Pi esidi ni of V W.C A. 



EVANS. MARGARET E. 

"Gladly wolde she terne and gladly 7V. he." 

Educated in the Owen Sound ('. I. After 
two yeais' residence, took 3rd year extra- 
murally, returning for 4th rear. Editor-in- 
Chief of '-Chronicle." 



FORTIER. MILDRED A. 

imrade blylhe and full of 
Who dares to laugh out glad ana 

Received earlier education at St Mildred's 
and Bishop Strachan School. Honours in 
English and History. A non-resident, 
and helpfullj mil rested in ( !olleg< 
National Service farm worker, 1917. 






HARRON. PHYLLIS E. 

at a distal 
Hut to do -chiii lies clearly at hand." 

\\ - educati Hamilton Public Si hool 

and ('. I. and al Moulton College. General 
Cours lli ad of Sale < ommitti - Mational 

rorkei '17. 



HARRON, ZELMIRA N. 

"1 know thai the earth exists: 
It is not my business why." 

Educated at Hamilton C. I. and Moulton 
College. Entered General Course. Head of 
Basketball, 4th year: Representative to To- 
rontonensis. National Service farm worker. 
1917 



MOSS 
"Then 



CHARLOTTE E. 



<■ is more wisdom than the vulgar drean 
of iii the admiration of a fair face." 

Educated at Glencoi Public and High 
Scl Is English and Historj course. Sub- 
Editor of "Chronicle"; Secretary and then 
\ ii i President of Literary Society; Inter- 
College Debate! : Head of College; Vice- 
Pri -ni. in \\ S V.C. 



PANTON. JEAN 

"Cheerful yesterdays and confident to-nti 

Began earli education at Milton Continua- 
tion School Household Sen nee Course. 
II .nl -I Hockey; head of Red Cross Soi 
Mational Servio w orker, 1917. 



PRINGLE. ANNE 

"In her tongue is the law of kindness.' 



TALBOT, CONSTANCE 



Tor 



'v Why she has a Wherefore." 



Mat i iculated from 
taken Honour Cours 
College Representati 
ference, and Presid 



( iwt'ii St mnd 
:• in Mi >dei n 
•e to Elgin 
nt of V.W.C 



C. ] Ha- 
Languages. 

I I. hi-, Con- 
A 



Received earlj education at Bishop Bethune 

lollege ; matriculated from Jarvis C. I. Eng- 

ish and History Course. Libraiian — Presi- 

ent of Literary Society. National Service 
ii m work, * 1 7. 



WATSON. WILLIAM S. 



"./ man of ninth 

iend." 



tsteeni <oo/ truly a 



irtlv 



Bill hails from Smith's Falls — has been 
Rep on Students' Council three years. Ex- 
change Editor of Review, Pies, of Lit., and 
has done much to keep Trinity in touch with 
(he rest of the University; capable in studies, 
faithful to his convictions, withal a true 
friend such is Bill. His departure will be a 
real loss to the College. 



WATTS. ALICE W. D. 

"Thou whose exterior semblance doth belie 
The soul's immensity." 

Educated at Brantford Public School and 
C. I. English and History Course Secre- 
tary of Athletic Association. Tieasurer and 
subsequently Secretary of Literary Society. 




.-^.ii^Si^ 



Hart House, Uni-Oersity of Toronto 




ST. HILDAS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

I < > I ' ROW Ada Garrow, Grace Chaffe ; Constance Talbot, President ; Aileen Boyd, Margaret Wintei 
ROTTOM ROW Helen Smith, I. Sen. Ldu.i Evans, Kathleen Armstrong, Doris Whitlier, 




ST HILDAS CHRONICLE. 
Helen Smith, Winifred Watts, Wilma Scott, Constance Talbot, th.nl. .u, ■ Moss, Doris Whittier, Ethel Dixon. 



71! 




ST. HILDA'S V. W. C. A. 
Jean Panton, Louise Elliott, Kathleen Crossley, Anne Pringle, Jean Hamilton, Jessie Lennard Margaret Winte 



t 1 it JW 

wm, mm mm^mm m\ I a m 

P m mm i ■ 1 11 mt~ I 

M* 1 mm '±)P' 49 9^91^ ^91 91 91 19^ to ^91 

9rm i HT mmr W J 


j*» *-■ P 
P-£- fl 

9^91 "^H 

1 i w 



ST. HILDA'S ATHLETK EXECUTIVE. 

TOP k<>\\ Aileen Boyd, kssie Lennard, Jean Panton, Margaret Winter. 

I. |>I 1 < > M K i ' \\ Kathli n Crossley, I >< »i i-^ Whittier : Kathleen Armstrong, President; Constance T-albot. Ma\ To:n. 




ST. Illl.h V'S BASKETBALL TE \M 
Vileen lloyd, N r orah Elliott, Marion Ewart, 1 >< • i i ^ Whittier, Je*si< Lcnnaid Mira [iarron. 




S1 lil I.DA'S TENNIS TEAM. 
K. Crossley, \ Crossley, I) Whittier, D. Trapp, J. Lennavd, .1. Panton. 



78 



To the Graduating Class of St. Michaels College 



By Father Carr 



( iraduates of Nineteen 
Eighteen! You arc leaving 
the College and Universit) 
after four of the mos1 pre- 
cious years of your lives. 
N i mr parents have f< ir many 
years watched you grow and 
de\ elop in body and mind. 
They looked forward to the 
day when they could g'ive 
you the best in the land in 
the way of education. In 
most eases it was their 
ardent desire to see you 
provided with advantages 
w h i c h they themselves 
lacked. This desire f< >r and 
veneration of knowledge 
seems implanted 1>\ nature 
in the human breast. The 
a\ erage man does n< it ana 
lyze closely; he feels that a 
man of knowledge has a big 
advantage over him. and yet 
he cannot say what know- 
ledge is. 1 le believes that 
university men are experts 
in the work, and without hesitation he hands his child over t<> 
them to receive an education. University men themselves are 
not so sure that they know the business of educating youth. It 
is true that even in the realization of any of the main- conflicting 
theories on education, experience seems to prove that the edu 
cated man stands a better chance in life's competition than his 
uneducated neighbour, still the thinking" educator seriously won 
tiers whether tin- responsibility cast upon him has been properl) 
discharged. All agree that, in spite of the fact that nearly all 
aspirants for university education have as their motive material 
success in life, the standard of good education is not in this. 
Education should help to bring out the potential good in man. 
i> 1 lor himself, good for his fellow man. Morally and relig- 




Fatker Carr 



iously, I should he inclined to hold that lack of education does 
not hamper a man. By this | mean that tin- individual man can 
work out his own salvation as well on the traditional morality 
of his fathers and his church unassisted by higher education. 
True education creates a new interest in the problems of life, 
increases our own capacity for happiness, hut. above all. and 
this I should place as perhaps the chief function of education, it 
benefits our neighbour and the race in general by the diffusion 
of that inspiration which, I think, must necessarily result from 
a taste of the sweets of higher thought. 

And can you say on your graduation day that the money 
sacrificed on you yes. and often a great sacrifice it is) and the 
years spent here have brought you a return?' If you have suffi- 
cient interest in any of the problems you have met to find a 
pleasure in hearing them discussed, there is some hope. But 
this is not much, for you will never he an inspiration to others 
unless such thoughts arrest your attention and interest so that 
you naturally think on them all by yourself. You will then inevit- 
ably talk' i if them t< i > ithers. 

Frankly 1 am not optimistic about what the average graduate 
carries away from tin university. Let it he said of you at least 
that you are not so wedded to your opinion as not to be willing 
to listen to another man's. Be sure you have knowledge before 
you are positive, and when/ you haven't knowledge be willing to 
follow faith. 

Since one of the greatest, if not the greatest, benefits of 
education is the boon it proves to other men. what other gradu- 
ates ever had or ever will have such a field for labour as now. 
when every day the field of slaughter robs the world of its finest 
jewels in the brightest intellects. What a loss is there! You 
must do your best to till a place of someone that has fallen. 
More, even though they were all still with us. see the increased 

wi >rk i il g 1 to he d< me. 

It is my fervent wish and prayer that you prove worthy of 
the responsibility you have- assumed, that Canada may be proud 
to call vmi her own. that your university and college may point 
to vim as honoured alumni and that your lives may show that the 
simple Catholic piety ami faith of a child may endure in the 
hearts of leaders of men and ol thought. 



SI I 



m 



-&-' 







ANDERSON NEVILLE M. 

"His shall be tin- light o] science to restore 
And bid Barbaric darkness flee away." 

Born in Co. (ink. Ireland. Early educa- 
tion at St. Mary's High School, Hamilton 
Came to St. Mike's and enrolled with Class 
'IS. Although his hair is auburn, Andy is 
of a genial disposition. On First Rugby 
Team. 



FLANNERY, MYLES B. 



"He is 
His life 



i evening revellc 
an infamy, and 



, who makes 
111,1s his fill." 



Myles is a man o' the North, his native 
place being North Bay, where he was born 
May 24, 1896. Matriculated from North Bay 
High School, 1914, then joined Class '18 at 
St. Michael's Vice-President of Students' 

Council; philosopher. Chief dissipation, danc- 



GALLEGAN, FRANCES 

". / creai u re not 
For human natu 



GILMOUR. KATHLEEN 



bright or go 

,la, /v / I." 



Far-famed Eganville was the seat of her 
early education. .lust for a taste of Varsity 
life s] u . came to the Queen City. She, has 
had a most successful course. In dramatic 
work she has distinguished herself as Phoebe 
and as I fermia. 



"A friend, noble and sincere." 

in Toronto. Ever a true and loyal 
S J. C. and one of its Junior Gradu- 
1914. Entered the General Course 
choosing science options where pos- 
Mways zealous, aspiring and beloved, 



Born 
pupil of 

ates in 
for 'IS. 
sihle. . 
tender and true and brave. 




HODGINS. MARY 

"./ smooth and steadfast mind. 
Gentle thoughts and calm desires." 

Horn in Toronto. Mary Hodgins received 
primarj and secondary education in New- 
market. Inspired by high ideals, she has 
pursued her course at St. Joseph's College 
with success. Her kindly disposition and 
gentle manner have won her many friends, 
whose good wishes will follow her in the 
tuture. 



rrfc— 

>man pel fa ted. 



KELLY. AILEEN M. 

"i ad's noblest re 

.1 m 

Thorold was her native town and the seem 
of her early school days After having ma- 
triculated from Loretto, Hamilton, she joined 
the ranks of Loretto College students, the 
love and respect of whom she has ever held 
through her ready sympathy and charming 
pet sonality. 



KORMANN, GERALDINE 



'Her 
Her 



ri'.v gesture ■•aid ' rejoi, 
ming was a gladness." 



Native place Toronto. A Junior Graduate 
of S. J. C. in 1915. Returned to St. Joseph's 
in the Class of '18, General Course. An 
earnest student, loyal to Alma Mater. Cor. 
Sec'y of Newman Club for 1917-18. Pos- 
sesses the rate charm of sweet amiable sim- 
plicity. 



McClelland, alice l. 

"That graceful ease, and sweetness void of 

pride. 
II ,, ,,ld hide hei faults if she had faults In 

hide." 
Alice was "born and bred" in Toronto, 
where, at Model School, Lillian Massej In- 
stitution and Loretto Abbey College, she has 
trod the flowery path of learning. It is even 
too meagre a tribute to rank Alice as one 
of the grandest characters in our College. 



81 




McDOUGALL. C JOHN 
" / long for a re 
The 



■I is 



Hi 



(• samt 



fame of < ilen Robi rtson « as made 
ecun when it became in 1899 the birthplace 
of "Mick) " II' attended Alexandria High 
School and matriculated at Ottawa Univer- 
sity. In 1915 he joined Class 'is in St. 
Michael's. lie represents St. Michael's on 
tin Students' Administrative Council. 



MACAULAY, KATHLEEN M. 

".-/ laveher f/";.vi an earth was never sinen." 

Kathleen was born in Frankford. It was 
after her graduation from Stirling: High School 
that she tame to Loretto Abbey College. 
Throughout her academic and College course 
her thoughtfulnes-s and consideration of others 
have been her dominating characteristics. 



MADDEN. 

"Here hmls 



EDNA 

the promise 



oj exi eeding woi 'th. 



Edna received preparatory education in her 

native town. Penetanguishene. She joined 
the 1918 Class at St. Joseph's College, and 
has always easily achieved success. Field 
sports and music have contributed pleasure 
and enlarged the educational development of 
this gentle endearing girl. 



MURPHY, MADELEINE 

"On every mountain height 

Is rest." 

Native town. Carleton Place. Obtained 

Ent. fo Faculty at S. .1. C, 1914. Returned 
to St. Joseph's and entered "Moderns," 'is. 
lias won the College Scholarship each year. 
A representative in debate, in the Women's 
Council and on the editorial staff of "St. 
fos i'li Lilies " 




O'LOANE. JOHN HENRY 

"1 here tranquil solitude, 
And iety 

As wise and good." 

John is a Toronto i luct 1 1< received 

pi ict " all) hi- « hole education at St. M i 
■ hael's Mat ii ulated in 1914, and his thirst 
for knowledge led him i" join Class 'is. 
Jack has a special liking for Philosophy, 
handball and i ug bj President ol tin Collegi 
Students' ( ouni il 1 1 his fut in e can be 
judgi 'I by past pet fi >t mances, it 
lugui 



OSHAUGHNESSY. WILLIAM 



•Whv 
And 



William 
dream vc 



lie v. 
ur timt 



I has 



J. 

alaue 



N'ativi i • I . i ■ ■ t. tieva, N\Y. Present resi- 
dence, Hamilton, having moved then in 1909, 
Matriculated from llaniilt.ni Collegiate, 1914, 
and joined Class 'Is. "Shag" works when 



he has to and specializes 
and handball. 



in ( .'i man. I Lilian 



SULLIVAN, 
"He makes 



BASIL F 

friends wh 

t 



ert 



he y, 
illcge 



Horn at Mount Cartnel. College cuius at 
Assumption College, Sandwich, (')nl Aft< 
graduating from Rhetoric Class, IT4, joined 
(lass of I Is. Unruffled demeanour and ready 
tact have made for him a host of confidential 
friends Success in his chosen profession is 
assut i il. 



TWOMEY. GENEVIEVE 

" / ersahle iiifieiunt 

Fenelon Falls claims our In 
as her own. After a few yet 
there, she went to Loretto C 
and finished her academic ed 
etto Abbey. She has shown 
only as a student but also 

attic buskin and by warbling 

lyn 



illiant President 
irs of schooling 
urn ent, < iuelph, 
ucation at Lot - 

her genius not 
by dunning the 

to the Lesbian 




St. Michael's College 



83 




ST, MICHAEL'S COLLEGE FOURTH YEAR EXECUTIVE. 

TOP ROW M B. Flannery, Miss K M Madden, X. M. Anderson, Miss A. McClelland. W J. O'Shaughnessy, \li-- F 

Galligan, ('. T. McDougall. 
BOTTOM ROW Miss K. Macauley, Miss (I. Twomey, .1 IT O'Loanc, Miss M. Murphy, Miss <; M Kornian. 



S4 



Class 1918 History 



rrasp. 



"A man's reach should exceed 1 
Or what is a heaven for?" 

It is that spirit which Browning expresses in these words 
thai lias brought and is bringing men and women from all parts 
of Canada to the various universities. It is a spirit that refuses 
tn he satisfied with the common things of life and seeks with 
an unconquerable zeal the higher. It refuses to recognize clan- 
gers or obstacles as insurmountable, and unhesitatingly attacks 
them all. It is the same spirit that moved the men of ancient 
times to undergo all the dangers and perils of travelling at that 
time and caused them to forgather in Athens, there to drink in 
the learning and wisdom of learned and wise men. 

Let us turn hack to that fateful year of \ ( >IA — a year of great 
import to the whole world. In that year the new class of 1T8 
gathered at St. Michael's, a class of men and women who had 
come from far and near, eager to take advantage of the higher 
education which was afforded them by a college that was their 
own and to prepare themselves for the positions which would 
he theirs, as graduates of the University of Toronto. Thirty-one 
young men — the light of battle in their eyes— betook themselves 
to their new task with a gravity that the awful events of those 
days inspired. What a class was there! In the lecture-rooms, 
the members of 1T8 upheld the high standard of former years. 
Many shared in the great triumph of that year, when St. Mich- 
ael's were the Intermediate Rugby Champions of Canada. The 
unprecedented events of the fall of 1914 gave an opportunity to 
the class to distinguish themselves in a military way, and the 
campus and Niagara Camp saw St. .Michael's men doing their 
hit in the C. 0. T. C. At St. Joseph's College and Loretto Abbey 
the feminine members of Class 1T8 — blushing freshettes — soon 
became accustomed to their new life and longingly looked for- 
ward to the day when they should he statelv and serious gradu- 
ates. At St. Joseph's this newest class numbered seven, and at 
Loretto Abbey six. To relieve the monotony of lecture and 
study, social festivities were indulged in and enjoyed to the full. 
National Service was a feature of the year in both Colleges. 

The first sorrow came to Class 1T8 when they reassembled 
in October. 1915, and noted the ravages which even that short 
time had wrought. .Many of the best known and oldest mem- 
bers of the Class had left it forever and it was impossible to fill 
their places. But consolation was soon forthcoming when the 
Class learned that ( )ttawa University had suffered to their advan- 
tage. Three members of that University came to St. Michael's 



and joined (.lass ITS. At Loretto Abbey also a friend and class 
mate was missing, hut despite this the ('lass had a successful 
year. A Dramatic (ltd) was formed and its initial production 
was that of '"As You Like It." The (lass at St. Joseph's suffered 
the loss of two of its members. A Literary Club was formed, 
which held many successful and instructive meetings. But all 
else was overshadowed when the Grim Reaper made his appear- 
ance and St. Joseph's lost a true friend and a devoted teacher 
in the person of Sister Austin. 

In their junior year the (lass was still further reduced in 
numbers. Though two more members were missing, the Class 
was still of medium size and carried out their duties as under- 
studies of the graduates with becoming dignity and success. To 
offset the lack of numbers, an admirable class spirit and loyalty 
arose, which was a result of this apparent defect. This session 
was marked by a signal success in the winning of the Kerr 
Shield, emblematic of the championship of the tntercollege 
Debating Union, which was won by St. Michael's for the first 
time. (Mass 1T8 had the pleasure of seeing one of its members 
on the winning team of debaters. The Juniors at St. Joseph's 
College were mainly occupied with Red Cross and patriotic work 
during the year. Loretto Abbey took part in the organization 
of the Intercollegiate Debating Club, as a result of which inter- 
class debates were held. 

Though Class 1T8 had already suffered the loss of a great 
number of its members, the cup of its sorrow was not yet full, 
for in October, 1917, it was perceived with the keenest regret 
that four of the most popular members of the Class were absent. 
However, the duties and obligations which fall to the lot of a 
graduating class soon turned the thoughts of all into new chan- 
nels. A very important work of the Class in this, its final year, 
was the organization of St. Michael's Students' Council, which, it 
is believed, will fill a long-felt want. The time of the students 
at St. Joseph's College and Loretto Abbey is taken up very much 
by patriotic work and with preparations for the coming gradu- 
ation. 

At last, after a rough and thorny journey, (dass 1T8 is at 
the parting of the ways. The days of college life are drawing 
to a close and a true feeling of sorrow comes over all as they 
realize that soon those who for four years have been true and 
loyal friends must part, and every member of the Class unites in 
wishing his fellow-graduates the greatest happiness and gond- 
fortune in the future. 



85 




Convocation Hall 



sti 



To the Graduating Class of Medicine 



B]? Dean Clarke 




Dean Clarke 



It is not a difficult matter 
in address the Graduating 
Class of 1918, as their path 
of diit \ is si 1 clearly blazed 
by the classes of the last 
three years. All that remains 
[or me to do is to point to 
the glorious deeds of gradu- 
ates who have added glory 
ti 1 the reputati< >n 1 »f the Fac 
ulty of Medicine 1 if the I mi 
versitv of Toronto — as well 
as enhanced the good name 
of Canada. This country 
has now established its right 
to be called a nation. You 
realize to the fullest extent, 
no doubt, that just as much 
is expected of you as was 
expected of those who have 
justified the confidence re- 
posed in them, and no one 
believes that you will not 
live up to the splendid tradi- 
tions which inspire you. 

\i iur education has been 
acquired during' strenuous 



days, and possibly your course has not been as complete as it 
would have been in antebellum days, but the practical experience 
the majority of you will gel overseas will be of inestimable value 
in fitting you for your life work. It has already been discovered 
that the student who goes to the front, serves for a time and then 
returns to complete his studies, comes back apparently much the 
worse for his experience, but in a short time it is learned that he 
has developed the serious part of his nature to such an extent 
that he soon recovers all that was lost, and eventually surpasses 
his earlier record. In other words, war is useful in developing 
character. 

Now that you have been lectured to so constantly for five 
Ion;;' years and crammed so full of advice, it would ill become me 
to add "the last straw" to a burden that can. in many respects, 
now be lightened rather than increased, because much of your 
training was, after all. intended merely to teach you the habit of 
acquiring knowledge. Medicine is a profession of ideals and 
practice, and unless you go forth determined to keep up with 
the kaleidoscopic changes which revolutionize Science so often, 
you will surely fail. Remember, too. that after the war this 
continent is to become the scientific centre of the world, the 
young men are to be the leaders in the advance, and young 
Canadians have on their shoulders the responsibility o\ keeping 
Canada on the firing" line. 






^s%£ 



AGNEW. G. HARVEY 

"He hath made many friends.*' 

Harvey was born at Toronto, 1895; Presi- 
dent Literary Society, Humberside Collegiate; 
Scholarship first year Medicine; Class Presi- 
dent; Chairman Daffydil Committee; Presi- 
dent Medical Society, and member of A. <). A. 
I fonour Fraternity. 



AITCHESON. W. STANLEY 



ALTON, JOHN A. 

"He's a good fellow and 'twill all be well." 



"When one woman has deceived you 

Quit klv love another." 

Born 1889 at Sundndge, Ont. Educated at 

Made Ins debut in Elora, 1892. Matricu- Strathcona High School, Calgary Normal, Uni- 

lated from the Elora High School. Cast in versity of Alberta, and Toronto University. 

his lot with Med. '18. Stan's quiet humour Taught school in Alberta. Best known as 

and pleasing manner have won him the good Interne at Wellesley Hospital, does overseas 

«ill of all. Treasurer of graduating year with C. A. M. C. after graduation. 



ARCHIBALD. CEDRIC H.. B.A. 

"./ merry heart doeth good like *, 



■di 



Horn June 22, 1894, Nova Scotia. Graduated 
from University College in 1914. After 
eighteen months' service with First Canadian 
' ontingent in France, returned to complete 
medical studies. 



Zjg&8®fflB3S$& 




BAKER. ROBERT H. 

"And he could almost heal a broken heart." 

"Bob" made his initial appearance in Kent 
County. Nov. 23rd 1 89 1 . After graduating 
From Ridgetown Collegiate, he registered at 
the College of Pharmacy, and compounded 
the cures for five years. Finally lie wisely 
decided to join Varsity Meds, and as the 
spin i e of his activity enlarges no doubt will 
be a credit to lii- Alma Mater. 



BANTING. O. FENTON 



BARNES. W. BRUCE 



'Night is to him a lively masquerade of day." ".I 



On July 3, 1894, the town of Lexington, 
Michigan, was the occasion of an auspicious 
event — the natal day of Oswald Fenton Ban- 
ting. Received his early education in Lexing- 
ton, Mich.; later at I. man High School, where 
In- matriculated in I'M I. ami graduated in 1913. 
Favourite motto, "G 1 night, nurse." 



naa not t 
of sense. 



en to words 



shite, a man 



Born at Toronto, '88. Matriculated at 
Parkdale Collegiate, '09. Victoria, '15; enli- 
vened to Medicine, '17. Mixed in the big 
European game in 1915-16. Still going strong. 



BATTEN. W. HOWARD 

"Why should life all labor he "• 

Curtain — Barrie, Ont., 1894. 

Succeeding scenes, Toronto University 

Schools and Medicine, 1T8. 
Finale- Canadian Army Medical Corps, and 

then ~? 



S9 













^r~><T -;■'' '' " ' 



BENTLEY, GEORGE A. 

"Here's to smoke ami never the blues, 
. I pi etty girl and lots of snoo i 
Geo firsl experimented with the mechanism 
.1! respiration in Port Arthur. After getting 
Ins earlj education there he decided to enter 
Medicine and enrolled with the Year 1T8. 
He twice played rugby on the winning team 
in the Mulock Cup series, where he proved 
hin sell as good a sport as he is a scholar, 
and his friends all wish him the success that 
Ins enthusiasm and ability foreshadows. 



BENWELL, CHARLES EDWARD 

"And he could even heal a broken heart." 

It happened in Rocky Bruce, Dee. 16, 1890. 
In 1900 blew to Saskatchewan Matriculated, 
taught three years, and then being found in 
possession of certain sums of money was sen- 
tenced to five years' hard labor at Medicine. 



POLES, WILLIAM P. 

"It's a great life if you don't 



saken. 



"Hap" got his start in Stratford on a 4-7-1 
mixture. Chases Dip. lings; the Puck: 
Players ; Aces ; and one woman. Has the 
coveted "T" for Hockey, and his friends all 
predict that he will score heavily in Medicine. 



BOND. C. ERNEST 

"Good goods are done up in small parcels." 
— Old proverb. 

Gait's aspirations to be a city began on 
"Bondy's" arrival there in 1894 

Drank G. C. I. dry of knowledge. 

Pooled— His fate with 1T8. 

His geniality will always strengthen the 
Bond of friendship'. 






BOYD. GLADYS L. 

"Nothing is so tf) ong as gentlenes >, 
ntle as real strength." 



nothing so 



Bachelot of Med-itation 

inspector of Brain cells 

Demonstrator in Industry. 

tor in-chief of the Undergraduati 
Mi dical Women's Council. 

) 'i not too intellectual t<> be human. 



BROWN. CHARLES C. 

"As full of spirit as the month of May." 

Charlie hails front Stayner, Ont. Gradu- 
ated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy. 
receiving Ins Phm.B., lune, 1913. Entered 
Medicine October, 1913. Class Sec'y, 1914; 
member of the Medical "At Home" Coin 
mittee, 1915. Medical Representative of the 
Varsity, 1916. 



BULMER. M. A. C. 

"She doesn't speak of what 
she docs it." 



the is going to do. 



Entering the profession in her early youth, 
Audrey has successfully passed every exami- 
nation, without neglecting social obligations. 
Het supreme excellence is her simplicity. 



CAIN. ROBERT F. 

"He who hath not 

Is til fot 

Born at i lot e Baj 
at Sault Ste Marie. 1 
-■si, iii student, but ha 

■the piano. 



music in his soul 
stratagems and spoils." 

in 1894. Matriculated 
911. Has been a con- 
- ont particular hobby 



91 1 



--^-■- .<_ ass ^ --a- d — 









CARLISLE. VERNON 
"None but himself can bt 



his parallel.' 



Born at London <>nt.. 1894; matriculated 

from Windsor Collcgiati ; overseas is months 
with Xo. 3 Stationary Hospital; President of 
the Graduating Year. 



COHEN, B.A.. BENJ. 

! D'^Ta nton pjjb>$ 

Arts, '13 Desired to help humanity and 
entered Medicine. 

His supreme ambition: To doctor the social 
cancer of unearned increment. 
His ideal State: 

Croesus non est ; 
Parvus regit, 
only — all the poor would be rich. 
Here's luck. 



COPP. J. C. 

"Let me ha% 



men about me that 



fat. 



Records show conclusively that "Larry" 
was born in 1890. educated in Clinton — while 
there attaining distinction in Athletics and 
Studies. He answered the call of the pro- 
fession : was hailed as a good student and 
good fellow by ITS — of which he was Presi- 
dent during the Sophomore Year. 



COUCH. ALBERT E 
"A man with <i tunic. 



is a man 



nh while." 



Horn in Bruce Co., Ont., but shortly after, 
however, he came farther south, residing in 
various parts of the province. Upon com- 
pleting his public school course, he attended 
the Tillsonburg High School, where he got 
his matriculation. 






CROMARTY. ROBERT P., M.Sc. 

Gossip from the Nurse's Residence, "Nice. 
polite and fine looking, but isn't it a shame 
he has gray hair." 

Born Toronto. 1892. 

Tarvis Collegiate. 

Arts, 1T4. 

McGill, 1914-1?. 

Army. 1915-1916. 

Finishing Medicine, 1916-18, and he still 
feels young. 



COULSON. EARL G. 



minute of our lives should 
sonic pleasure note. What 



"There's not 
stretch without 
sport to-night '" 

Has had a soft spot in his heart for 
Leamington since Oct. 23rd, 1895 High 

School handed him out in 1911. Joined 1T8 
at earliest opportunity. Still going strong. 



COX, MICHAEL A. 

"Care to our coffin adds a nail, no doubt, 
Every grin, so merry, draws one out." 

Born in Chicago, 111., '93. Entered U. C. 
with 1T5. One of the most capable members 
of "The Varsity" staff. A successful motor 
salesman. Weakness — women. "Army's" 

perpetual optimism and cheery smile will 
spread sunshine in the sick-room and the 
ward. 



CUNNINGHAM. WALLACE HERBERT 
"Though 'crapped oft-times in Medical lore, 
His talent was of a curator, 
Devising how in tunes of need. 
He could outdo the bookman's greed." 
Born at Greenock, Ont., Wallace received 
his early education at the Greenock Public 
School ; matriculated from the Walkerton 
High School; attended Stratford Normal 
School, '09, and taught three years; entered 
Medicine at Varsity in 1913. 



9] 



- - ^^ -' '-<- - — 






EDMONDS, LEWIS C. 

'//is little bod v contains ,i great art." 

Entered tin world with the usual infantile 
squall, at I'm mil. i in June, 1894. Matricu- 
lated from Riverdah High School, spent two 
years m \it-." bul then entered Medicine, 
in which profession we predict for him a suc- 
cessful future 



EEDE. JOHN R. L. 

"Be'si thou sad 01 met i 
The violent .• of either thee bc\ owes 
So does it no man else." 

Act 1 Leamington, 1894, March 28th. 
Act 2 The same, some years latei 

Sports and studies of all kinds 
Ad 3 Toronto, 1913-18, Social success. 
Act -I anil Act 5 — Watch wedding announce 

ments, etc., etc. 



ERB, ISAAC 

"It's dogged as does it. 



FARMER. GEORGE R. D. 

". Iwake ill,- pert and nimble spirit of mirth." 



"Ik.' and the year 1886 began In. simul- Tradition has it that he smiled, walked, and 

aneously. lie spent his early days between played chess on his natal day. Oct. 18th 1896, 



the plow handles near Stratford. Medical 
Representative to Osgoode; Member Alpha 
Omega Alpha Honour Fraternity; Presidenl 
Student Volunteers; Preaches for recreation. 



in Ancaster. He walked through U. ('. ('., 
'classed" his way through the University, 
and intends t" smile his way through life 
Member of tin Honoui Medical Fraternity. 






FEADER. HARRY 

F i ader is Ins name 

. In, I feed-her is his nature." 

Plain Hany Feadci made his debut al To 
onto l in ersitj 1913. After a stri nuous 
abattoii experience, he became desirous fie 
a highei i o/i em- With the permission of 
ilitarj authoi tties to finish his last j i ai . 
he is n. iw ready to do his little hit. 



FINDLAY. CHARLES A. 

"His honest, cheerful, modest face 
.lye won linn friends m every /'/.i.e." 

Born at Manotick in lN9o. Raised on the 

farm. Educated at Kemptville High School, legiate and entered Varsity with Meds. 'I?. 

Agriculture couldn't hold him. Entered Medi- but dropped out at the end of his second year, 

cine I'M.!. Graduated with tin last wishes re-entering with class 'IS. where he has be- 

oi everybody. come a general favourite 



FLEMING. R. J. MORTIMER 

"1 work when , can, and when I can't, don't." 

Mort. was born in St. George in the dis- 
ant past. Graduated from Jarvis Street t'ol- 



GAMEY. LYMAN ROSWELL 

".) merry heart doelh g / like medicine." 

Born Sept. -'.'<. 1890. Son of late R R 
Gamey. Membei of A K. K. Frat. Gradu- 
ated from Core Bay Collegiate in 1906. He 
entered '15 (lass of Varsity Meds., hut was 
forced to .hop out at the end of his fourth 
year on account of sickness. He re-entered 
'18 class .ui'l l.as become a friend of all. We 

Wish him evel \ success. 



92 






GARBUTT. CHARLES T. P. 

"My only hooks 
Were woman's looks, 

And folly's all they've taught me." 

History of present illness- Sudden onset, 
Sept. 5, 1889, at Aurora Rapid development 
at Madoc II. S., complicated by term at 
Calgary Normal School, and four years' teach- 
ing. Localizing symptoms appeared in 1913, 
when he joined IT8. Absence of vocal im- 
pairment demonstrated in Medical Quartette 
clinic. Prognosis excellent. 



GEDDES. WILLIAM A. S. 



'He in the 
Of young, 



general bosom r 
of old; and sexe. 



rigned 
both 



•nchanted." 

Originated at Whitechuich Ontario. Gradu- 
ated with honours from Lucan Collegiate En 
tered Medicine and stopped studying. Only 
man alive who ever refused election by accla- 
mation tn Presidency of the .Medical Societj 



HARRIS. WILLIAM 



"A 



real man 
live." 



who livi 



he was meant to 



Born Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Toronto. Graduated Arts '15 



of P 

and 



& B. 

i g I 



Course 
sport. 



•Bill' 



Educated in 
Honours, head 
a keen debater 



HENRY, WILLARD J. 

"Brevity is the soul of wit." 

1894-- Born— Markdale, Out. 

1898— Caught first fish— Fell in. 

1909 — Owen Sound Collegiate— Difficulties. 

1910 — Mcaford High School Change is as 
good as a rest. 

191 1 — Matriculation— Surprised. 

1911 — Victoria College — One prayer meet- 
ing Housemaid's knee. 

1912— Village Schoolmaster- -H'll. 

1913 Medicine Still going strong like 
fohnny Walker. 



*m&mm* 






V,- 



SjF* 



HOLMES. AURDY B.. B.A. 
"No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en; 
In brief, sir, study what yon most affect." 
Born at New Westminster, B.C., Dec 14, 
1892. Having a love for travel, he came East, 
graduating in Arts at Victoria Collegi in 1913. 
Medicine attracted his inquiring mind, and 
he cast his lot with the class of IT8 1! is 
a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Frater- 
nity, an ardent musician, and a thorough 
-Indent. His future i- assured. 



HOLMES, WILLIAM H. 

"He was the mildest-mannered man 
.It the md of his course, and when he began." 

Born in Athens (not Greece) in 1893. After 
a preliminary education in Athens High School 
and a brief adventun in railway construction, 
entered Medicine in the Class of 1T8. Repre- 
sented his class at McGill. Wc predict for 
linn a brilliant future. 



HUGHES, J. VERNON 

"He kept sound wisdom and discretion." 

Began near London. Some time later took 
Matric. and Part I. Faculty at London C'ol- 
1 giate. Four years at Western Medical; class 
president in fourth. Came to Toronto in his 
final year. Still going strong. 



JONES, HOWARD O. 

" I ' nboi >i to-morrow and 
matters if to-day In 

It was a trusty day in 
In- began h - sojourn 
pleasant smile shows no 
lure. I le attc nded God( 
live y ars pi i vious to 
of medicine. 



dead yeste 

sweet." 

February. 1893 

among us. I! 
sign of low te 
n th High Sthi 
Ins interesting 



■day, what 



. when 
ul his 
mpera- 
.ol for 

StlKh 



<.»:< 




KENNEDY, ROBERT BRYSON 

Born at Valley City, North Dakota, U.S.A., 
in I89S. While still on a 4,7,1 mixture 
moved to Kingsville, Ontario, where lie re- 
ceived his Public School education, later 
matriculating from Essex High School before 
entering Medicine with the present 1T8 (lass. 



LANE, W. ROSS 

"Alas, the love of women! He found it to 
he « lonely and a fearful thing." Byron. 

"Mack" saw his natal day in Belmore, Ont., 
April 22, 1893. Matriculated in New West- 
minster. B.C. Iiegan Medicine with Class 
'17 Saw overseas service 1915-16 with 26th 
Battery, C.F.A. Member of A. K. K. Fra- 
ternity. 



LAZENBY. FREDERICK S. 

"He may be young, but he Ims old ideas." 

Woodstock, Ont., saw him first. lie ma- 
triculated at Woodstock C. I. Played Senior 
Meds. Rugby three years. Strong for the 
ladies; blondes are his favourites 



LEACH. JAMES W. 

"A pretty woman is a welcome guest 
Bom at Meaford, t In 



Meaford High School. 
Normal School. Curato 
'14. Sec ret. -ll \ of the C 



Matriculated from 
Attended Toronto 
of Medical Society, 
raduating Year. 







LEONARD. SAMUEL C. 

Intii ipation is the oil that feeds the flame of 
life. " 

Sam was born in Oxford County, Ontario; 
matriculated and then graduated from Albion 
e, Michigan; was a member of the 
Michigan All-Stai Football Teams, l'm.i.do ; 
attended University of Alberta 1913-16 and 
won the Alberta Scholarship in Anatomy 1916, 
and is a member of the "Alpha Tan Omega" 
Fraternity. 



LLOYD. IRWIN M. 

"Oh, why should life 



LOCKE, H. 



nil labour he. 



Born in Newmarket, Ont., in 1896, and 
after a brilliant High School career entered 
Medicine at the tender age of seventeen in 
the class of ITS, where lie lias proven himself 
an industrious student and excellent com- 
panion to all who know him. 



W. B. 

Have 



Born 1 s ' ' .i . Have done no brilliant thing in 
Medicine or out. Have had rare moments of 
positive gaiety, mostly between 1914 and 1916, 
while with 1st Canadian Division in France. 
About the future am a hopeful pessimist. 
Finis. 



LOW, DONALD M. 

"1 take lit from no man." 

The town of Lindsay is guilty of rearing 
this long youth. Matriculated there, then 
one year at McGill in Vancouver. Vice-Pres. 
Medical Society. Served on Medical At Home 
Committee and Torontoncnsis Board. Repre- 
sented Meds in interfaculty tennis. With ill 
bis sound common-sense lie has ,i weakness 
For light hair and blu< eyes 



94 










frae a' has aye 



MacDONALD, JAMES D. 

"An honest heart that's fret 
sonic cause to smile." 

Born in Teeswater, where he matriculated. 
Third Year Secretary and an active- and popu- 
lar member of Class 'IS. 



MACPHEKSON. ARNOLD W. 

"A man not given to words or strife, 
A man of sense." 

"Sandy" was born at St. Thomas in the 
"nineties." Received his preliminary educa- 
tion at home. Entered Medicine in 1913. 
Studied hard; played Rugby and made good 
A clean sport; a true friend; a credit to his 
Alma Mater. 



McCALLUM, DUNCAN 

"He loved to set the world as mile with 
humour sweet." 

Duncan McCallum, born in King, Ontario. 
1895: obtained his High School education at 
Aurora and North Toronto. Then taught 
school in Northern Ontario, before entering 
Medicine, of which he has made a success. 



McClelland, j. harold c. 

Family Bible says "Peel County, 1896." 
Attended Riverdale H. S. and many dances. 
Once stung — by a wasp, thereby receiving an 
incentive to study Medicine. Entered Class 
'18. a popular, energetic student, fond of 
work and motor cars. Is known to be an 
authority on pretty gowns 




1 





McCOSH, JOHN THORNTON 
"Rouse him; he'll speak his 



mind." 



Jack's early life was spent amidst the lights 
of Paris (Ontario). Here he took his Senior 
Matric. Graduated from the Faculty of Edu- 
cation. Taught in Sturgeon Falls, Ont., and 
Toronto. Entered Medicine. October, 191.?. 
Class Treas., 1915. Member of Torontonensis 
Board. 1918. 



McKAY. D. WALTER 

Born 1894, New Westminster, the home o 
championship lacrosse. "Mac" showed re 
markable athletic prowess. Entered Medicine 
captained Junior and Senior Meds. Basketbal 
Teams. Won Faculty colours First and Sec 
ond T. Played Senior Meds. Rugby. Is 
President of Medical Athletic Association and 
Business Manager of Daffydil Night. 



McLEOD. NORMAN D. 

"Ctf manner mild; of nature true 
And quiet -wit — lie had it too. 
But through it all — storm, calm or fray. 
He heft the even tenor of his way." 

Born August 12th, 1891, Rugby, Ont. At- 
tended Rugby P. S. and Matric. at Orillia 
Collegiate Institute, 1909. Played Association 
with various teams, including the "Simcoe 
Champions, 1911." 



McNALLY. H. JAMES 

"She is beautiful, and therefore to be 'wooed.' " 

Jimmy received his early education at Gall 
and Kitchener. Ontario. Taught school one 
year. Spent one year at McGill, Architecture, 
'16. Entered Varsity, Medicine. '18. Treas- 
urer '17. Med. interfaeulty soccer. Genial, 

g 1-natured and a good student, we predict 

a bright future. 



McNEVIN. P. P. 

"1 love the 



Mai " w as born i 
twenty-six years ago. 
High School and 
Taught school four 
["oronto. Entered M 
bei "i \.w man ( Hub. 

\l;u ," 



1 Uxbi idge, < Int., some 

Educated al Uxbridge 

Petei borough Normal 

j i ars bef ire coming in 

dicine with 1T8. Mem 

Here's success u> you, 



MALYON. ROY H. 

"Forever wandering with a hungry heart, 
Much hate I seen and known '" 

Roy was born in Reach, Ontario County. 
Attended High School, Uxbridge, after which 
lie went to Peterborough Normal School. He 
entered Medicne in '\2 His summers were 
spent in instilling knowledge into Western 
Canada's youth. Roy's mind is of the enquir- 
ing kind, ami this will stand him in good 
stead when he begins to practise medicine. 



MEADER, F. M. 

"For if she 'will she 
And if she teon'i she 
end on't." 

( Iraduating from St. 
demy in 1 '< I 3, ' Jimmy 
where she lias enshrine 
'»f a host of friends. 



,// v 



in may depend on't. 
on't and there's an 



Jos< ph's College Aca- 

came into Medicin* . 

1 herself in the hearts 



MITCHELL. FRANK R. 

"If hy people nt Hunt 

one thing I never could 

V 



teal life, is the 
see. " 

saw the light of da) at Meaford, Ian. 
7th. 1893.. 
Known at College as "Corn- 
Surgeon Probation R.N.V.R., 

Active Service. North Sea. 



-field Mitchell " 

Dec. 10, 1915. 

[915 and 1916. 




NESBITT. JAMES H. 

" II ho a, : ei felt the 1 • nor n aiden'. 

hand in his." 



I mi embai keel "ii In iournej in 1892 in 

I'oronto. Early education at Humberside C. 1. 

After matriculation, decide. I to see -'.in. ol ,n ~ '"' a < ll " ' '■ 

the world, and later, seeking a professional , '"" "' '"" class 
.'I with Mi .Is 'is. Me has 

I" ■ ii enthusiasti li i unctions, 

and we all < .i brilliant career. 



NETTLETON. EDWIN 

"A cheerful heart doeth g / like medicine." 

Edwin Xcttlcton, born in Toronto, 1893. 
Matriculated from Jarvis Street Collegiate. 
Me joined our class two years ago. after doing 
I In is a w i lei .mi addi 



OWEN. TREVOR 

"My strength is to sit still." 
I'. i nil Februarj 26th, 1894, in Calgary. Al- 
berta. Educated in Toronto Honour Matric. 
I'. T. S.. 1913. Medicine'. ITS. 



PARKS. WILFRID R. 

"Tut, ned in the >•. 1 n cn ■ miv desperate 

studies." 

August 12, I89S. Toronto born and bred. 
Read) Irish wit, kindness and integrity have 
won him sue..-- parti) at l)e\\s,,n St. School. 
Harbord Collegiate Institute, finally in his 
chosen professions, Motor Boating and Medi- 
cine 



% 




PERLMAN. DAVID 

"Student: athlete: gentleman; 
Aye! every null a man." 

On Feb. 24th, 1893, David made his earthly 
debut in Toronto. Matriculating at Jarvis 
Collegiate Institute, he successfully pursued 
tile study of Medicine. Hero of numerous 
diamond and gridiron battles. His industry. 
amiabilty and sterling worth all point to a 
successful future. 



PRATT, CLARENCE VICTOR 

"Well! I'll tell you Pratt." 

Clarence Victor Pratt received his initial 
observations in Cobourg, Out , where he at- 
tended High School. He next turned to Drugs 
and graduated from O. C. P. 1910-11. Of 
his personality we can say but this, "He makes 
friends wherever he goes." 



QUINT, WALTER S., B.Sc. 

"Take a little tip from (a) father" 

Matriculated from Dartmouth College, 1908; 
finished Arts in 1912; University of Heidel- 
berg, 1912-14; American Ambulance, France, 
1915; College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Columbia, 1915-16; University of Toronto, 
1916-18; and he's still going strong. 



RANKIN, ROY W. 



■'II hei 



do 



go from here?" 



Through no fault of his own. Rank was 
born in Chicago. Soon moved from the stock- 
yank to Peterborough, thence to North Bay. 
Two years in Arts. Member of A. < >. A. 
Also finds time to break a leg playing football 
and to fiddh with his violin. 






RISEBOROUGH. ERNEST C. 

"A man of action yet of social grace." 

Porn in 1895. Started Medicine in 1913. 
Editor of Epestaxis 1917, and a member of 
Alpha Kappa Kappa Fraternity. 



ROBERTSON, JAMES M. 

"For. e'en though vanquished, lie could argue 
still." 

Born in Toronto some twenty-five years ago. 
1 dunted ;i.kc;-mg- ( lie g . ::; :):. -tnd Up- 
per Canada College, '05-'09. Spent three years 
in business before entering Medicine with 
ITS. Member Students' Council, Fourth Year. 
Here's wishing you success, "Bob." 



RYMAL. LLOYD C. 

"On with tlie don, e 

"Jimmy" naturally conns from Hamilton. 
["here he secured his prime-evil knowledge-, 
thence to Varsity for his further study along 
similar lines. Prominent in athletics (Mexi- 
can) and fussing. Greatest exponent of the 
"Elephant Glide." Still going strong. 



SCOTT, WILLIAM J. 

"1 am a pari o] all thai I have met." 

Bill was horn at Claremont, Ontario, in '94. 
Matriculated Claremont Collegiate, and forth- 
with joined the Meds of 1T7. He took time 
off to do service in France in 1915-16, then 
"carried on" at Toronto lie played a clean 
game and hit the line hard. 



!•: 






SIEGEL. MORRIS 

"//,■ is a typical Jew 

Born in Poland in 
Rabbinical School, W 
on the Canadian soi 
Nov. 28, I'M I. 



in looks ,iu,i unit 



ers. 



1889 ( 
arsaw, in 
I for the 



Iraduated at a 
1909. Stepped 
first time on 



SIMPSON. ROY W. 

". ///./ what we have 
are." 



been makes us what 



Onset— Born at Grand Valley, (int.. 189S. 
Development — Public School at Waldemar, 

Ont. Farmed two years. Continuation 

School at Grand Valley, Out. 
Present Illness Medicine, 1T8. 
I liagnosis ? 
Prognosis Doubtful. 



SINCLAIR, JAMES W. 

"Still waters run deep." 

"Jinimic" was born in Toronto in '95 After 
matriculating from J. C. I., he entered Medi- 
cim with ITS. Has played live seasons on 
Med. Rugby teams and three reasons on 
Basketball teams. Holds tin "M," also a ' T." 
went in fencing. Vice-President of .Medical 
Athletic Society, 1916. His many friends wish 
him every success in the future. 



SMITH. JOSEPH R. 

"Acer doubted cloudi ''I'll/.." 

Matriculated 1909. P.. A.. Vic. 1913. One 
year's Fellowship in Physiology. M.A. 1914, 
Left Class of '17 to go overseas in 1915. 
Active Service in Lemnos and Egypt. Mem- 
ber of A. K. K. and A. (). A. Fraternities. 






mssmssmas mp*. 



SNIDER. LEDA. B.A. 



'Sin- has jaithfulnei 
pi in, iples." 

( )i percipient mind 
Leda's ingenuity has 
valuable to both tl 
Y. \V. ('.A. 



s and sim ei il y as v< si 



, Arts did not 

made her as 
Medical < 



suffii I 
sisl ana 
oilncil 



and 

in- 

and 



SOULES. 
"B 

'•Mel" v 

1 1 1 in.it in ii 
a year in 
towing his 
cine. lie 
Bcientious 
predicted f 



MELVILLE 

e. ,iy ii the 

as born in 
lated at ( Isha 
the drug bu 
natural inch 
has proved 
student, and 
hint. 



H. 
Soul' 



o] wii 



IS''.! in X.ii 
w a I I igh Sell 
siness, and 
nation, entei 
an eai nesl 
a successful 



th York. 
(Mil. spent 
then, lul- 
ed Mid. 
and con 
liilur, i- 



SPENCE. ROY J. 



'// the) 



one g\ 



rl it 



/tiling !■• 
ii anothc 



b, loved 



Born 1892. Matriculated 
Ont. Taught on the prairie 
joined Meds 'is. Treasurer 



at ( >range\ ille, 

two years, then 
Medical Society, 



membf r Medical \\ II onu 

iiil.nl w iiuer." 



Committee, and an 



STEPHENSON. BENJAMIN G.. M.D. 



To sir,;, 



l,i 



"Sir,, nil ill will 
i-.7. , to tin, I. nil,! not to yield." 



Ben arrived in Toronto. He matriculated 
Jarvis Collegiate in '99, where lie captained a 
couple ..i fnterscholastic champion teams 
M.D. from University of Illinois ami state 
Hoard in 1912. Rich in humour and saving 
. immi .i' sense. 



lis 






STEVENSON. GEORGE H. 

"Let George do it.'' 

Born in Toronto in 1894. Primary educa- 
tion at Philadelphia and Hamilton, Ont., ma- 
triculating from Hamilton Collegiate. Spent a 
year in Active Service in Lemnos, Egypt, and 
England. Member of Alpha ( >mega Alpha 
Fraternity. 



STRACHAN, JAMES G. 

"Life piled on life were nil too little." 

Horn to Science. Fame and Fortnnc in To- 
ronto on the 30th September, 1893. Matricu- 
lated from Jarvis Collegiate. Served his coun- 
try in Lemnos and Egypt. Member A. O. A. 
Honour Fraternity. 

N I!.- Fame and Fortune still embryonic. 



STREET, HAROLD W. 

"I am a fort of all that I have met." 

Harold first made his appearance in the 
town of Owen Sound, where be ungratefully 
received his early education. Leaving High 
School, to the telief of himself and others, 
entered Medicine in fall of '13. His genial 
personality has won him a host of friends. 



STUART. L.M. 



" Long Boy" 



■' Jynx " received his preliminary training as 
a wit and munition-worker at Gait, Ontario. 
His ready smile and keen sense of humour made 
him very popular, not only in his own class. 
His success in Medicine is assured. 






SULLIVAN. HERBERT 

"His roguish eyes turn to a modest gaze 
By the sweet power of music." 

"Herb" was born and brought up in Bruce 
Mines, where he matriculated. Mined one 
vear and taught three years before entering 
Medicine in October, 1913. Med. Rep. to 
Students' Council. '14 and"'15. Musical Direc- 
tor of Med. Society, '15 and '16. President of 
year in '16. 



TOMLINSON, NELSON F. 

"A hind and gentle heart he had, 
To comfort friend or foe." 

Ontario County claims Nelse as its son. He 
was known as the brightest pupil in Uxbridge 
High School when he was devouring Caesar 
there. He attended Faculty in 1908-9, and In 
'11 he entered Medicine. Nelse has an im 
usual depth of "grey," and we are confident 
that be will reach a prominent place in his 
profession. 



TUCKER. RICHARD M. 

"His cogitative faculties immers'd 
In cogibundity of cogitation." 

Born Oct. 26, 1894. Matric. at Welland 
High School. 1911. Entered Medicine, 1913. 
Enthusiastic member of Med. Orchestra. 



VALENS, ASHLEY W. 

"./ man he seems of cheerful yesterdays and 
confident to-morrovis." 

Born in Bruce, 1883; to Saskatchewan 1894 
Later. Brandon Collegiate and Regina Nor 
mal. Some years teaching at Lamont, Alta 
Tine! years Medicine at University of Alberta 
To Toronto with ITS. Overseas on gradua 



9! I 



'N } ( 



"'■' 



;:- 






VAN ETTER. OMAR 

i omnia vincunt." 

Oma was bo n al Wai dsville, Ont. fs one 
of those modest, industrious men who can be 
ed on with certaintj to win solid results 
in iife. Wc expecl to hear oi him again 



WAGNER, LE ROY 

■■Willi mali, e toward none, 



hiii , harity foi all " 



Horn i" Kitchener, June 8, 1893. He re- 
ceived his preliminary education in the city's 

cl I- A year at Stratford Normal School 

i pedagogue preceded his 



and 
careci 



year as 
.11 Varsity. 



WALKER. FRANK N. 

"Why fret about to-morrow if to-day be s 

Ill started his journej on a sunshiny day 
in August. Entered the shadows of Brampton 
II. S.. 1908. Came out of the shadows with 
Matriculation, 1911. Hoping to be a bright 
ami shining "light," he entered Victoria Col- 
lege, where he spent U\<> dull and cloudy 
years. In 1913 he had a vision of a brightei 
career and entered Medicine. He is still fol 
lowing the "Vision. " 



WERDEN. WILLIAM A. 

" / 'ire Napoleon." 

William A. Werden, hum in Toronto, iss_'. 
Matriculated from Woodstock College, then, 
saturated with knowledge, he decided to enter 

Medicine, from which lu has great hopes of 
graduating in the fours,- of time. 




WEST, S. E. T. 

"Hurry! Contentment is ambition's dope.*' 

Born hi Angus, 1889. Matric. Barrie ( •>! 
legiate. Entered Faculty of Medicine, To 
ronto, 1913 Sacred to his memory are many 
incidents oi tin following five years, and inci- 
dentallj man j i 'thei s hat d to Forge! 



Hill 




EXECUTIVE OF MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN'S COUNCIL AM) MEDICAL Y. W. C. A. 

TOP ROW — F. Sinn-. L. Sn icier. M. Stuart, M. Cowan. 

BOTTOM ROW S. Cay: J. McClure, President Y. W. C. A.; G. Boyd, President Council; L Chase, M. Folinsl.ee. 



KM 




102 




MEDICAL AT-HOME COMMITTEE, 1917-18. 

I'dl' ROW W. T. Noonan, '21; J. W. Tice, Medical Society; V. Carlisle, Medical Society; F. J. Bell, Medical Society; 

R. G. Ratz. '20. 
BOTTOM ROW— L. C Rymal. Secretary; J. R. L. Eede, Chairman; Dr. C. K. Clarke, Hon President; G. II. Agnew, 

Medical Society; C. O. Young, '19. 



103 




MEDICAL DAFFYDIL COMMITTEE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW— E. J. Nelson, K. M. Jewell, E. G. Hanley, L. A. Pequegnant, C. V. Mulligan. R. G. Rat/. E. A. Carleton, 

R. F. Cain. 
BOTTOM ROW C. T. P. Garbutt; F. J. Bell, Chairman; Dean Clarke, Hon President; \V. V Geddes, Secretary; D. VV. 

McKay. Treasurer. 
ABSENT- \. 11. Russi 11, I, K. Miller. 



104 




105 




Toronto General Hospital 



106 




To the Graduating Class of Applied Science 



Bi> Dean Ellis 



Dean Ellis 



Each undergraduate who enters the University has a three-fold duty to perform. 

A duty to his parents and himself, a duty to the University, and a duty to his 
c< mn try. 

1 take it that you. when yon have completed your course with credit and satisfied 
the requirements of your instructors, may he considered, as undergraduates, to have 
fulfilled the first of these duties. 

As for the second, your duty to the University, each graduating class leaves the 
University either better or worse for their sojourn within its walls. It was your duty 
to leave the University better than when you entered it. That you have done so can- 
not be known until your successors show that they have been influenced for good by 
your example while here and by the memory von leave behind von. I hope that it will 
prove in this way that von have done your duty to the University, 

These things are now beyond your control. When you leave us your duty as 
undergraduates has been done or left undone. As graduates your duty to your coun- 
try lies before you. To her you owe the privileges you have enjoyed here. Some of 
those wdio entered with you have died for her. It remains for you to live for her. 

Live to show that you yourselves, your University and your country are the 
better for the years you have spent here. 



108 



Jn fflemnrtam 




I Uracil 



T. L. Harli 



<;. K. MacKendi-ick 



P. L. M.C.t 



.1. R. Mitch 




G. M. Pearc. 



T. VV. Pcnhale 



1). G. Scott 



J. M. Souter 



C. M. Willey 



F. A. Wood 



10!) 




*• a. r i 

-r**! Club- 






PRESIOENT. 



Engineering- Society Executive 

UNIVERSITYofToRONTO. 



1917-18 



sasa 1 *- 



ggg 





■ ■ ■ 



?orff$pornj<"^iecret<»ry. 



'■Or* 7 * 4 

Pr*>s i>*Year 



no 




School of Practical Science Buildings 



111 




FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL CLUB EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW — E. Dunn, Treasurer; K. McLean. Curator. 

BOTTOM ROW I. E. Hess, Secretary. R. A. Fraser, President; E. W. McLeod, Vice-President. 



12 






BALLINGER. JOHN G. 

"Respect every man's opinion act on your 

own." 

John (I. was born at Streetsville, Oct. 16, 
1894. Streetsville High School and Humber- 
side Collegiate Institute gave him W i -> early 
training:. The 1T7 electricals were his for- 
mer companions, but he stayed < • n t a year to 
finish with a decent class. 



DUFF. C. KENT 

"Early to bed, and early to rise. 
Makes men healthy, wealthy ami wise." 

Arrived in Hamilton, May 25, '96. Left 
II C. I. with honour standing in Faculty 
entrance, and honours each year has been his 
specialty with ITS electrical. Treasurer of 
Science V and member of Toike-Oikestra. 
Although a bashful "fusser," we predict for 
him a brilliant future. 



ELLIS. FRANK D. 

"There's nothing half so sweet m life 
. Is Love's Young I >< earn 

Thomas Moore. 
It was .i beautiful morning in October, 
1896, when Frank's innocent personality was 
brought into tins wicked world. Showing 
marked intelligence at frequent intervals, he 
was sent to the Technical High School, and 
in 1914 entered School with the Civils. He 
was Captain of School's Mulock Cup Rugby 
Team and also Civil Rep. on the Engineering 
Society. 



FAIRCLOUGH. HERBERT W. 

"What's in a name 

Was burn in Hamilton in 1894. lie ma- 
triculated from the Hamilton Collegiate Insti 

ttite in 1912 and entered School as a Civil in 

1914. Commonly known to Sri 1 men as 

"I'll.." h carries with him their best wishes 
to the railroad world. 




FRASER. RODERICK A. 

"O, to he in England! Browning. 

In May. 1915. Rugby, hockey ami absence 
from lectures proving monotonous. Roddy 
departed for France. However, while serving 

with the Divisional Signaller-, a dispute with 



HANCOCK. CLARENCE W. 

"Quiet waters run the deepest." 

Born in Hamilton. Nov. 5th, 1891. Left 
II. C. 1. with Junior Matriculation, and, won- 
dering what next to do. finally became ab- 
sorbed in the contemplation of test tubes and 



a Hun -hell enabled him to return and dig ente rS<! S - £: . S ; "'. th the Chemical Engineers 
for knowledge instead of cover. " f 'T 8 ' „ lhlrd „ Yea , r ' Vice-President, and 

rourth i car. President of the Industrial 
Chemical Club. Wide-awake and ready for 
business. 



HYMAN, BENZION 

"// is never loo late." 

Being brought up in a Russian "gymnas- 
ium" under tin- oppressivi regime of the ( zar, 
he came to Canada in l'<14 to enjoy tin free 
life of the Canadians. He entered with the 
Fourth Year of the University of Toronto in 
the S. I'. S. in 1916. Sickness, however, com- 
pelled him to stay out that year, lmt he did 
not lose hi., nerve and earn, back to complete 
hi- technical education. 



JOHNSTON. FRED E. 

"/ truly shall n,>i give up hope, 
Till I prove the theory of the gyroscope." 

Fred commenced his career July 12. 1893. 
Left Ridgetown ('. I. with a strong deter- 
mination to pursue the paths of science, so 
wandered into S. P. S. with the Electricals 
of 1T8. Always a friend when needed, and 
an enthusiastic supporter of all activities 
around '"School." Pastime — Arguments and 
the- ladie--. He will make- a promising e-n 
gineer, 



113 




MACDONALD. CHARLETON E. 

"./ hard subject foi a forty-word biography." 
-An old ' Ti 'i < mtonensis." 

Parkdal. Collegiate, 1910. Then S. P. S. 
Rugby ai both, including Universitj Firsts. 
Lieutenant, 3rd Pioneer Battalion. Wounded 
Ypres salient during service, 1916. President 
Engineering Society, 1916-17 Engineer, sol 
diei and friend. 



Mcdonald, norman g. 

"Time wasted is existence, used is life." 

Mac hails from Sunderland, matriculated 
from Beaverton in '11. was green at Varsity 
m 14. Spent his strenuous, but successful, 
summers in Peterboro making "pills" for 
Fritzy. Ilr gms. "Good luck"' 



McLEOD, EARL W. 

"Though sometimes seriously inclined 
He has a humorous frame of mind." 

Jan. _M. 1893, was the eventful day. Era- 
bio, the place. "Mac" completed his course 
at Woodstock C. I. and London Normal; 
then entered S. 1'. S. with the Electricals of 
ITS. President of the Electrical Club, Jr 
Section, 2nd year, and of the Sr. Section, 4th 
year, and also a live-wire in "Y" work. 



MADDOCK. CHARLES O. 

Three men went out a hunting 

I n eighteen-ninety-six, 
Until they came to Inwood. 

And there they found this rix. 
"He'll lie a farmer," quoth his uncle. 

And his grandad didn't say nay. 
Hut his daddy said he's an Engineer 

If 1 can find the way. 




MENDIZABAL. A. RANULFO 



'/•' 



i : ttingut ■ hed i i induct 



the field ' 



Best known to IT5 nun and by them great 
|j ni-~. .1 when ' .dl. d to his Bolivian home. 
\ Varsitj "T" holder, gymnast and wrestler. 
A man whose s,- n s e ,,f justici weighed the 
personal sacrifice of war against thi broad 
principles at stake, whosi generous nature 
-.in him overseas ■ ' private artilleryman and 
i nuns home w ith corpoi al si ripi - and 
lii \l miiii foi activi servici 



MITCHELL. ROBERT C. 

Justice strongly acclaims Ins choice 

Wor is he /<•</ captive by the common voice." 

•Mitch" was ushered into reality at Lon- 
don, (hit., had enough "Scotch" to bring him 
to the top, forcing his way into tin world 
not unbeknown, and after teaching school for 
two years, landed at S P. S. with 'IS ( ivils. 
Scratch him in the right place and you find 
a jolly good friend. 



ORR. W. HAROLD 

"He's little but In \ wise, 
lie's t i musician in disguise." 

Harold came into this world in 1896, and 
with few exceptions has remained here In low 
ever since. Four years at Toronto Tech. 
failed to satisfy him as to what made lie 
door hell ring. -,, ne entered School with 
the '18 Electricals. At School his quiet, eon 
sistenl manner, coupled with his ability oil 
ill. ivories, has won for him a host of friends 



PEARSON. GRANT P. 

"Twenty years from now, mayhap, 
I will look with love upon his map." 

I, rani was wished on the good folk of 

Schoniliel'g. 1894. Attended I'lekeim- I ol 

lege, 1911-13. Came to "School" with '17 
Civils, but stayed out a year to finish in good 
company. Mixed up in all kinds of sport, 
anil won his "T" for hockey. Member of 
Fourth Year Executive. A worker, athlete 
and friend. lice's to you, Grant. 



114 



ROBERTSON, W. DOUGLAS 

"A villain, that is hither conic in spite 
To S< "in at our solemnity." 

Entered this vale of tears at Toronto, May 
27th, lS9t>. Educated with difficulty at Uni- 
versity School and T.C.S. Pres. Sketch Club, 
'18. Represents the Mechanical Class for 
191S. ( >n view in Thermo Building after 11 
a.m. 



ROVSKY. JACOB 

"Veni—Vidi- 



I 'ici. 



First traces of "Jake" are found in 1888, 
in Volynia, Russia. Appears again in Canada 
in 1907. Comes straight from the ranks of 
labor to "School" by reason of hard work, 
assisted by private tutor. Though foreign to 
our ways, a good "scout" and with the boys 
in everything. He'll succeed. 



SAGAR. WILLIAM L. 

"His talents were for music rare. 
His singing made the hoys all swear." 
"Siss" commenced activities on this planet 
in Toronto, 1895, and has been going strong 
ever since. He matriculated from Jarvis C. 
I. and entered "School" with '18 Civils. lie 
has taken an active interest in athletics and 
executive work, being elected President of 
the Fourth Year. Always comes up smiling, 
and will go far— if not pinched for singing. 



SAMUEL, MAXWELL 

"High Ambition and deeds which surpass it." 
"Sammy" first burst into song in London. 
'arf the bloomin' world, 1896, but finally 
landed in Toronto, 1905. Matriculated from 
Jarvis C. I., and entered "School" with Civils, 
'18, where he took honours annually. Played 
rugby, and hit the line hard in everything 
he undertook. Leader of Civil's draughting- 
room choir and on Fourth Year Executive. 
Pax vobiscum Sammy. 




SCOTT. CECIL R. 

"1 have taken my fun where I found it." 

Arrived on "terra firma" at Richmond, 
Ontario, 1892. Blew into S.P.S. with '18 
Civils. A true school man, he has always 
been an ardent admirer of the fair sex. 



SHEPLEY, JOSEPH G. 

Born in Essex County and educated at 
Essex High School, affectionately called Gore, 
in preference to the more plebean name of 
Joseph. For three years at the School he 
studied mining and "other things" along 
scientific lines, and after three years' practical 
experience has decided to drop the "other 
things" and enlighten the world along the 
line of flotation. Without any reference to 
his military standing, this boy is Al. 



WOONTON. W. 



GORDON 

rolled back 



and earth did 



"When the waters 
appear 
The Lord He created the Engineer." 

The year 1896 was hailed into existence by 
infant squalls from the victim of this portrait. 
A genial youth, popular no doubt — Pres. of 
"Y," Treas. Eng. Soc, Head Usher Convo- 
cation Hall, etc., etc. Electricals, '18, claim 
him. Best of luck "Gord." 



115 



Class 1918 History 



Two months after Great Britain declared war on Germany 
we. the individual members of the budding Class of ITS, filed 
into the Secretary's office in the C. and M. Building to be 
enrolled and pay the required deposit. Unacquainted with the 
peculiarities of this new educational life before us, we, no doubt, 
possessed an awed and bewildered appearance, which we en- 
deavoured to conceal under a mask of calm confidence, especially 
in those more advanced students whose critical eyes were 
directed to the latent possibilities in the new freshman year. 

As a result of the declaration of hostilities and the financial 
stringency that followed it. we numbered but one hundred and 
thirty men in our rirst year. In spite of this, however, we 
mustered sufficient forces to accept the annual challenge of the 
sophomores to the inter-year contest, commonly referred to as 
the "sera])," which took place on the hack campus. Notwith- 
standing the disadvantage of our short mutual acquaintance, we 
battled against our opponents successfully for a half an hour, at 
the end of which we all possessed an outward appearance of 
striking similarity, namely, liberal applications of shoe-blacking 
and a shocking lack of habiliments. It was a "grand and glorious 
day." and there has not been a "scrap" equal to it since. 

Shortly after this episode the voluntary military drill com- 
menced for the students under the direction of the C. O. T. C, 
<>i which, all our Class took advantage with few exceptions. 
Slowly but surch we became acquainted witli the requirements 
and benefits of college life and were soon able to withstand the 
withering gazes and ironical remarks directed our way by sundry 
profs, when we arrived late for lectures. The days flew by, one 
b_\ one, until April— ominous and threatening — was upon us. 
Some of us were forcibly introduced, for the first time, to our 
promiscuous collect inn of notes in the plugging process that 
foreran the exams. Others, placing their patriotic devotion be 
fore self-advancement, enlisted in the overseas forces and were 
given their year. 

The following September our year reassembled, but consider- 
ably reduced in numbers. However, the old "school spirit" was 
still alive, as frequent lively and exciting eyents fully proved. 
\s sophomores we displayed greater dignity as such ami assumed 



an air of profound and superior wisdom, calculated to impress 
the verdant "frosh." We spent as much time as we dared in the 
smoking room, reading the latest jokes in the humorous publi- 
cations and worrying the piano when so disposed. Our lectures 

this year assumed a more engineering aspect ami were less like 
the High School lessons of the first year. At the completion oi 
the last term a number of Class members, having received special 
drill in the C. ( >. T. C, were sent to England and given Imperial 
commissions. 

With our ranks now reduced to about forty men. our third 
year started off well, but was marred by an abundance of work, 
which was projected at us by the unfeeling staff. Our year 
passed quietly, however, as the other years had also decreased in 
size, 'idle University was closed for nineteen days in January 
due to a coal shortage, but by doubling up in the Thermo- 
dynamics Building we managed to squeeze in odd lectures. 
Again the annual spring grind was prepared for and passed 
through with more or less uncertainly and apprehension, and we 
w ere free once more. 

Upon our return as seniors to our old haunts — there being 
twenty-six of us altogether — we found our familiar corners had 
been taken oxer by the military authorities and converted into a 
School of Military Aeronautics. Our former lecture rooms, 
study rooms and even our smoking room had been taken over 
by the invading hosts of the R. F. C. The remaining few of our 
year were forced to take our lectures in the space that was 
spared us. An innovation this year was the compulsory military 
and physical training required of all students. Two nights a 
week saw each one of us reporting for drill, from which benefits 
will no doubt result. Our theses caused us considerable worry 
and effort during the first term, and as the closing months of the 
second term arrive we look back on our four years' sojourn here 
with a feeling of regret that we will not pass through it again. 

The valuable assistance given and interest displayed by the 
Dean and professors of our Faculty in our Class throughout the 
course has always been a source of pleasure to us. and their 
patience and kindness on our behalf will always merit a sense 
of gratitude. 



lie 




APPLIED SCIENCE FOURTH YEAR EXECUTIVE, 1917-18 

rOP ROW- C. W Hancock, Chemical Representative; W. I). Robertson, Elec.-Mech. Representative; M. Samuel, Civil 

Representative. 
BOTTOM ROW G. P. Pearson, Secretary-Treasurer; W. L. Sagar, President; C. R. Scott. Vice-President. 



117 




FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE V. M. C. A., 191 

TOP ROW -W. II- Oir, Social Service; F. I). Ellis, Mission Finance; .1. .1. Weicker, 
Xr« Student; V. Voaden, 1st Year Representative; J. i',. Ballinger, Membership; 

BOTTOM ROW— L. T. McNaughton, Secretary: W. ('.. Woonton, President; Prof. II. 
Arnold, General Secretary; C. K. Duff, Treasurer. 



Vice-President; C. J. McNamara, 

II. B. Cody, Bible Study. 

W. Price. Hon. President; D. O. 



US 




APPLIED SCIENCE ATHLETIC EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW— F. R. McDonald, 2nd Year Representative; G. P. Pearson, 4th Year Representative; W. L. Sagar, Secretary- 
Treasurer; H. Byshe, 1st Year Representative. 
BOTTOM ROW— A. R. Mendizabal, President; Dean Ellis, Hon. President; Capt. H. S. Johnson. Vice-President. 
ABSENT II Rose, 3rd Near Representative. 



119 




SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE HOCKEY TEAM, JENNINGS CUP CHAMPIONS, 1916-17. 
\ P McKenzie, Centre; S. F. Duggan, Wing; F. R. McDonald, Wing; Profess,,, Arkley; II. Spencer, Cent,,: ].. .1 
I evesque, Captain; G. Pea,-,,,,. Manager; D. G. Scott, Defence. 



120 




EXECUTIVE OF THE INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL CLUB, 1917-18, 

rOP ROW — H. C. Kerman, Secretary-Treasurer; A. R. Clarry, 3rd Year Representative: J. C. Bell, 1st Year Representative. 
BOTTOM ROW— Prof. J. W. Bain, Hon. Vice-President; C. W. Hancock. President; Dr. W. II. Ellis. Hon. President. 



121 




122 



* 




To the Graduating Class of Dental Surgeons 



B3) Dr. Seccombe 




Dr. Se 



The chief history of a 
class of students in the Ri 13 al 
College of Dental Surgeons 
1 if ( hitarii 1 is the same as 
that of any other similar 
body of student^ among the 
warring nations: one of sac- 
rifice and devotion to duty. 

When the Class of 1918 
entered College there were 
ninety-two members, and 
now. as the final examina- 
tions approach, there are less 
than a dozen. During the 
first year seven members en- 
listed, leaving eightv-si\ to 
enter the second year; of 
these fifteen enlisted during 
the session, and three others 
during the following session. 
Messrs. Dalrymple, McGuire 
and Greenwood made the 
supreme sacrifice for their 
country on the fields of Flan- 
ders. 

So as to hasten the date 
of graduation of Dental stu- 



dents, that they might the better serve their country, a special 
Summer Session was conducted. Sixty-four members of the 
Class of 1918 availed themselves of this opportunity to become 
prepared for practice. The remainder, together with returned 
veterans, make up the Class of 1918 as it is to-day. 

A large part of college education is obtained bv contact with 
fellows, This part of education has its greatest influence when 
there are few distracting elements from outside. In this respect 
the Class of '18 lost much, because, during all their course, there 
was constant change, turmoil and disruption. Everv young man 
seemed to be just awaiting the time when he might join with 
his comrades overseas. With all the distractions of classmates 
leaving and returning, classes being rearranged, course changed, 
and professors leaving for the front, the Class of '18 has still 
held together, what is but a mere remnant of a once large body. 

No class of Dental students have had a greater opportunity 
for developing self-reliance and individuality. In the present 
chaotic condition of society, industry and education, young men 
have a wonderful opportunity to rise from their surroundings 
into positions of leadership. When the members of the Class 
of 'IS find their places among the men and women of this nation 
their influence will be felt for good in matters of Church and 
State. Each year graduates in Dentistry have a higher goal to 
reach and greater responsibilities to assume. If each man of this 
class has the vision and lives to attain it. the College, the Uni- 
versity and the Profession will continue to be proud of the 
Class of '18. 



124 



BARRY. FRANCIS H. 

"Prudence, caution, self-control is wisdom's 

root." 

Was first heard of in Barrie, Ont. lias 
since mastered the art of making friends. 
With a mixed career of educational, civil. 
military, and social experience, he was Vice- 
President of Freshman Year, President of 
Senior Year, and Editor-in-Chief of the FT\ a 
Yaka. 



BOYD. ARCHIBALD W. 

"When time and circumstances suggest, 
He shall not fail to do his best.'' 

Augusl 6th, 1895, was heralded in Copper 
Cliff, Ont., by Archie's infant roar. Creemore 
Collegiate furnished the key to R.C.D.S. Ab- 
sented himself for a session after his Sopho- 
more Year, and returned to join Class 1T8. 
Representative of Track in '17. Treasurer "At 
Home" and President of Y.M.C.A. in '18. 



FAUMAN. ABE S. 

"Musi, hath charms." 

Born ui Argentina in 1894. Matriculated 
from Hamilton Collegiate. Entered R.C D.S. 
in 1914. Leader of Orchestra, '14-15. "At 
Home" Committee, '16. Hya Yaka Staff, '17. 
His entrance into Dentistry will be a mutual 
benefit to him and the profession. 



HENDERSON. HUGH K. 

" Try anything ont e." 

Born in Beaufort, S.C., August, 1893. Edu- 
cated at Prescott. Entered Dentistry with 
'15, graduates with '18. In the interval roughed 
ii ut .Northern Ontario. Has amended some- 
what to the refining influences of College life. 
Held a few class and School Executive offices. 







HUMPHREYS. ELFORD V. 

"Down with referendum, we want conscription." 

Markdale, Ont., declared a holiday on Dee. 
9th, 1895, on his arrival. .Matriculated Pick- 
eritig College. Xewmarket. Entered Dentistrj 
with Class '17. Went overseas with 67tb 
Battery, 1916, discharged a year later. Vice- 
Chairman "At Home" and Secretary "At 
Home" Committee. Vice-Pies. R.D.S. 



HUTCHINSON, T. HARRY 



<W 



th hook in hand, we see him sir 

the Stioii, I." 



illhu/ dozvn 



Hutch arrived with a loud voice, at Ever- 
-ley. (Int., Feb. 21, 1896, matriculated from 
Woodstock College, 1913, and entered R. C. 
D. S., where he became a necessity on the 
Hya Yaka staff. After two years overseas he 
was returned in September. I'M 7. to com- 
plete his course. 



ALEXANDER 
worth while is the man ; 

'ything goes dead wrong." 



McCUAIG, 

"The man 

smile. 
When evei 

Born, Shanty Bay, June. 1890. Educated 
it Barrie. Entered Queen's, 1909, and Dent- 
istry in 1911. Dropped out in 1914, returned 
in 1917. Pleasant disposition Secretary- 
Treasurer R.D.S.. 1917-18. 



McGOWAN. EDMUND S. 

"I see a moil's life is a 

"Mae" arrived at Brechin 
late for Christinas. Migrated 
College, where he received J 
iii.it i ii . Joined ( 'lass '18 in 
Pres S. mcir Year. \ bri 
him. 



to, lions one." 

Ont., oni da \ 

to St. Mh hai I's 

uuior and Si tlioi 

1 (entisti y. \ ii i 

it future await-. 



125 



engineei . at bridge 



McRAE. M. F. 

"//<■ might have been 
work he's a bear." 

Jusl nicelj passed the quartei century 
mark, he looks the part. His wise and un- 
assuming manner has had the confidence of 
Ins fellows and the College. Proof, he was 
Secretary of Parliament ami is President of 
tin \t I [om< " ( 'ommittee 



REGNIER. 



THEOBALD 

" / ive le Ret/m 



Theobald made his debut Feb. 28th, 1896, 
at Rockland. Primary education Rockland. 
Ottawa University furnished his key to R. C. 

I). S. Good athletic supporter. His hobby — 
hockey. His quiet and conscientious manners 
won many friends during his sejour. 



SCHAFFER. BERNARD 

"The man who has no musit in his soul 
Is fit for treason, stratagems, mi, I spoils . " 

New York first saw him. Wended his way 

to the profession after the usual preliminaries. 

Basketball enthusiast, lover of good music, 
,-ilsci skates. Dental. 



SPROULE. SAMUEL W. 

"To h — with yesterday, what's doing to 

Jan. 31, 1895- a public holiday proclaimed 
at Sandown, Out., in honour of Sam's debut. 
Matriculating from Vankleek Hill Collegiate. 
he entered Royal College with IT8. Pi - 
dent of Parliament and Captain of Inter- 
Faculty Soccer Champs. 1917-18. Thrice llya 
Vaka and twice the "At Home" Committee 
claimed his valuable services ere bis regretted 
departure from R.C.D.S, 




The Campus, Uni^ersitv of Toronto 



1-26 






aG Oa 

IB ^^^B nt of ->i Home tronimt iw jtn-eti,^ . ( „ r i,jr SprOf P<iiliame"t. IB M B 

^ ^^ THE CABINET ^5k ^F 





IfOVAL C0LLE(tEof DENTAL SUfTfrf OWS 

Executive Boor Of The smm immi 







W^ 1917-18 "^^Pr?* .^0^. 

o- WWmi gl jf njrltanirnt 

^H ^B ^H ^E Jrrasurpr 






127 




ROYAL DENTAL SOCIETY EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW I.. .1. Miller, Representative Sophomore Year; L. <;. Fraser, Representative Junior Year; W. I'.. Black, Repre- 

sentativi Freshman Year. 
BOTTOM ROW E. V. Humphreys, Vice-President; II. K. Henderson, President; E. C Young, Representativ< Senior Year; 

A. McCuaig, Secretary-Treasurer. 
ABSENT Dr. VV. E. Willmott, Hon. President. 



128 




■Mi 



9BH 



ROYAL COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGEONS Y. M. C. A. EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW — E. J. Ferguson, Hand Book Representative; S. S. Crouch, Vice-President; R. G. Agnew, New Member; A. M. 

Palmer, Finance. 
BOTTOM ROW — H. K. Henderson, Representative of "T" Mixer; W. M. Seymour, Treasurer; A. W. Boyd, President; 

T. C. Clemence, Secretary. 



129 




1311 




DENTAL COLLEGE SOCCER TEAM, INTERFACULTY CHAMPIONS, 1917-18 

Till' ROW— D. J. Ferguson, Inside Left: F. A. Butler, Left Half; J. L. McGowan, President of Athletics; Dr. Willmott, 

Hon. President: C. L. Griffin, (ioal : II. Adams, Outside Right. 
MIDDLE ROW A. E. Barnby, Left Half; L. G. Fraser, Left Full Hack; S. W. Sproule, [nside Right (Captain); W. D. 

Smyth, Right Full Back; H. R. Day. Centre. 
BOTTOM ROW— F W. Edwards, Outside Left: R. R. Forbes. Centre Half. 



LSI 







d A I 





DENTAL HOCKEY CLUB 





N0RLX35 AMATEUR CHAMP I ON5 




ft 





13-2 




To the Graduating Class of Forestry 



33 D 



ean rernow 



Dean Fernow 



The forester is a patriot by profession, for his business is to provide for the future 
1 if the nation in peace time; hut he is to be found as patriotic in war time, when the 
sterner demands on his citizenship call for sacrifices. 

It is thus that the Faculty of Forestry has suffered perhaps more than any other 
by the call to arms, and the Class of 1918, the class which entered at the beginning of 
the war. perhaps more than any other class. 

( )f the twenty men who entered that year, one only is left to go to graduation, with 
three of earlier entrance to the University, so that the Clas> of 1918 ends up with only 
four, two of whom had enlisted hut are now physically unfit for military service. 

The enlistments were not, as might be expected, made mainly for the semi-peace- 
ful occupation of the Forestry Battalions; only three of the 'Class and thirteen of the 
whole Faculty enlistments have been for that service. Two members of the Class. 11. S. 
Edmonds and F. G. Stupart. made the supreme sacrifice, and A. E. Cuzner, who was an 
aviator, fell into the enemy's lines and is now reported killed. The Faculty of Forestry 
is still in the pioneering stage, and the withdrawal of any one man is a distinct loss to 
the country at large. 

We record the fact that of 71 undergraduates and graduates of this Faculty known 
to have enlisted (28 of the latter), at present writing not less than 12 have given their 
lives for their country, 17 have been wounded, gassed, or ill, two are prisoners. 



131 



JJu iUpmnrtam 




A. E: Cuzner 



H. S. Edmonds 



F. G. Siui .11 1 



135 





COURTNAGE. ROSS A. 

"Valiant m love, undaunted in way." 



KAY. JAMES 

"/ have a book on that. 



ROBERTSON, WILLIAM M. 

"Knowledge comes but wisdom lingers.' 



"Hit the trail" at Brantford, 1894. Matri- Born in auld Scotia. Jimmie came to ]!ill originated ami received liis early edu- 

culated, 1909. Entered in Arts, subsequently Canada in [907, entering the Dominion For- cation in Toronto. Then the call came ami 

found his place in Forestry. With outbreak estry Service. Desiring to supplement Euro- he fared forth into the Northern Wilds. In 

ni war ucnt over" as an aviator, returning pean practice with more technical training, 1914 he returned to acquire scientific knowl- 

as enthusiastic a Forest i as ever the Faculty of Forestry made his acquaint- edge for the education of his beloved land, 

ance in 1912, losing him for three years "to into the way it Fhould grow. 

dae a wee hit o 1 campaigning in th' army." 




136 



To the Graduating Class of Pharmacy 



By Dean Heebner 




Dean Heebi 



The vocation of Pharmacy calls for a dual training in the mastery of its profes- 
sional side and adaptation to its commercial aspect. During four years of training under 
the instruction of a pharmaceutical chemist you acquired a certain amount "I* knowledge 
in the theory and teclmic of your chosen calling and in merchandizing; you then availed 
yourself of the course of instruction furnished by the Ontario College of Pharmacy 
and thereby extended your education in the theory and practice of pharmacy, which 
eyentually enabled you to become legally qualified pharmaceutical chemists and p"^c-^- 
sors of the degree Phm.B. 

Your future success will now be of your own making. Do not imagine that you 
haye finished your study because you have secured the coveted diplomas, for you have 
only been taught what you must do, and the end of your College curriculum is the be- 
ginning only of your work. 

Among the many elements that go to secure what may be called professional suc- 
cess, true character is most important, and in a very true sense such character is the 
only true success of life, rather as the factor in the production of a result than itself 
a result. Carefully guard your character, and reputation will take care of itself. You 
will be judged by what you are, not wdiat you appear to be. Conscience is the backbone 
of manhood; put your conscience into every prescription you dispense. A pharmacist 
should be a pharmacist because his spirit will not allow him to be anything else; there 
must be professional enthusiasm. If you can be first in anything else, and only a third- 
rate pharmacist, then leave pharmacy for that something else. 

Do not be mere professional men and women, for specialism tends to narrow the 
mind. Remember that you are citizens as well as pharmacists, and take an interest in 
public affairs and in all movements that tend to right wrongs and correct abuses. Have 
a true public spirit. God speed you. 



138 







v—t,- ••■Vt.^.s^'ttt^ ^r 7 - - , 






BRADSHAW, JAMES V. 

"Triii- and faithful teas his 'Fort/ 
That's why we named him 'Brad' fot short." 

The eventful date was April 13, 1891. At- 
tended Newburgh Public and High Schools. 
Matriculated at 1!. C. I.. Ilrockville, winning 
the medal for (uncial Proficiency, '12. Mar- 
ried, '16. Pharmacy Representative on Stu- 
dents' Administrative Council and Toronton- 
cn-is (if Class '17. 



BRICKER, T. 

"All honour to Bricker of '17. 
//,- Ihith both brain and wit, 
Fur sorely wounded he came to us, 
He sure has dona his bit." 
Born April 16, 1893, Listowel, Ont. Matri- 
culated and served apprenticeship there. Was 
very prominent in athletics. Served with 43rd 
Cameron Highlanders in France. Veteran of 
Messines, Ypres, Somme, and Vimy Ridge. 
Buried by shell at Vimy, and returned to 
Canada and O.C.P., 17-18. 



BYERS. ROY J. 

"In all litmus else to be generous, 
But of old friends to be most mise 



■ly. 



Saw the light of dav for the iirst time on 
Feb. 22, 1892, at Bailieboro. Matriculated 
at Peterboro, and entered the pill-pounding 
profession with McDermid and Jury of the 
same town. Bright hopes for the future. 



CHESTNUT. ROBERT J. 

"// takes a long time to Irani a Utile, 
But a shart while to forget a lot." 

Startfd in the drug business in St. John, 
X.I! , but went West and finished his ap- 
prenticeship in Calgary, Aha Attended Phar- 
mr.i x . 1917-18. 






COCHRANE. PAUL T. 

"Still -.raters run deep." 

Born m Tara. Matriculated in St. Thomas. 
Started apprenticeship there with Fred W. 
Judd. but went overseas in 1915. He was 
fortunate enough to be returned in time to 
attend O.C.P., 1917-1918. 



COGHLAN. HARRY A. 

"British by birth, 
British by nature, 
A jolly fine fellow 
iVas his nomenclature." 

'Flu auspicious event happened August 6th, 
1887, London, Eng. Boyhood days were spent 
in historic city of Worcester. Came to Can- 
ada in early teens. Matriculated at II. C. I., 
Hamilton. Entered Pharmacy. '17. 



COUGHLIN, HUGH J. 

Population of Toronto was increased on 
February 17, 18'»4. Attended St. Ann's 
School. Matriculated De La Salle, 1913. 
Immediately took up the art of "pill pound- 
ing" with L. W. Biggar. Attended O.C.P., 
17-18. Always keen on sports 



CROSTHWAITE. EARLE M. 

"Some highball, let's follow." 

Born at Norwich, Feb. 19, 1895. Matricu- 
lated from Norwich High School, '1-'. Start- 
ed brilliant career under the supervision of 
A. F. McLaehlin, analytical chemist. St. 
Thomas. Took an active part in spurts of 
( ».C.P. 



139 



. 







. 



DAVIDSON. H. A. 

"Forgetfulness is not a trait o\ nature, 

But is a habit." 

Born 1890, in Alliston, Ont. Served ap- 
prenticeship under L. T. Harrigan, George- 
town, Ont. Entered Pharmacy, '17. 



DAVIS. NORMAN H. 

"Where thai chicken danced that tango, 
By that < ool and shady nook, 
There you'll always find this chicken 
With his memorandum book/ 1 

Born at Chatham. Educated at Central 
School and matric. at Chatham C. 1. Always 
lived by himself and is never sail. Finishing 
his 6th year of Medicine at Pharmacy. 



DEAN. JAMES E. 

" '. I Dean/ but not 'The Dean.' 
Black as night is his hair, but oh! those eyes." 

Arrived on Dec. 4th. 1896. 

Matriculated at Collegiate Institute at O.S. 
in 1912. 

Served five long years with a prominent 
druggist in the same town. 

Attended O.C.P., 1917-18, and served on the 
Class Executive. 



DENNIS. EDWARD J. 

"//(■ wore a smile worth a fortune 
With ii naughty twinkle in his e 

Denny, born and matriculated in Norwich, 
entered drugs, '13, serving apprenticeship in 
Mitchell and Windsor, Class is. Hobbies - 
baseball, hockey, fair sex. Shea's. 






DEWAR, EDNA M. 

"Energetic and quid-. 
But her you t annot stick, 
By her work xmi can see, 
She's as l'ii * v oj a bee. ' 

Graduated from Plattsville Continuation 

Scl 1 in 1913, with matriculation. Began 

het apprenticeship with her father and coin 
pleted it in London. 



DOCKRILL. MURIEL I. 

"Doc"- witty and original. 

Graduate of Smith's Falls Collegiate In- 
stitute, with matriculation, and served her 
apprenticeship with her sister at the Dockrill 
Drug Ston 



FAHRNER, ERIRN G. 

Born 1892, at Crediton, Huron County. 
Ontario. Attending College of Pharmacy of 
'17 and '18, with a result of personal satis- 
faction of education for future benefit. "As a 
first Pharmacy student of Crediton, may suc- 
cess be my credit." 



FERGUSON. E. LESLIE 



'./ man with a smile 
Js always worth u 



l: 



rn on a farm Oct. 2. 1896. Matriculated. 
'13, Woodstock, an. I served apprenticeship 
with X. G. McHardy, Woodstock. Entered 

I >.(' P., ( lass '17-18. 



1-1(1 




^S^JAfe ii-. 



FRANCIS. S. M. 
"Fac 



et Spera. 



Successive scenes m 
and Kingsville led him 
P. in 1917-18. Still h 



Brantford Port Per 
to Toronto and O. 
oping. 



HANHAM. ARCHIE E. 

Landed in this weary world Jan. 4, 1895. 

Matriculated and served his apprenticeship 
in St. Mary's. 

Student at Pharmacy, '17-18, and played on 
the football team. 



HARDEN. ELSIE C. 

"Gives everyone her ear 
But few her voice, 
Takes each one's censor 
Hut reserves her judgment." 

Graduated from Lindsay Collegiate Institute, 
with matriculation, and entered on her ap- 
prentice in 1913 with Jury and Lovell, of 
( Ishawa. 



HARWOOD. H. M. 

"The fates will decide.'' 

Gave his first cry at Woodstock, 1896, 
served his apprenticeship at Karn's Drug 
Store, Woodstock, and gave his first O.C P. 
veil in '17. 



— 7?; ] 




HAYNES. ARTHUR S. 

"Honor and shame, from no condition rise, 
.hi well your purl, there all the honour lies." 

Arthur gained entrance to this world on 
Dec. 31st, just before Father Time turned 
the page for the year 1894. Matriculated at 
St. Mary's, '13. Apprentice with W. A. Mc- 
Intyre — an enjoyable four years. Attended 
O.C.P. to complete education. '17-18. Suc- 
- to him. 



IRWIN. THOMAS. 

"Give me a place to stand and I'll move the 
earth." 

Met the world the 8th of January, 1894, 
and still going. Matriculated at Brantford 
Collegiate Institute, 1913. Served four years 
apprenticeship as Pharmacist. Member of 
O.C.P. football team. Pharmacy. '17-18. 



ISBISTER, J. 
"Every r 



JENKINS. 



has 



its o-.cu huhilul.' 



From the College register, evidently born 
in North Shields, England, but he docs not 
look it. One thing he can do, "Forget." 
Entered Pharmacy, '17. Can't say when he 
leaves. 



CLIVE R. 

"Be brie] " 



Known as "Red." Born October 16, 1893, 
Woodstock, Ont. Matriculated, Woodstock 
College, 1912. Vice-President O.C.P., '17-18. 
Hopes to graduate this Tunc "Nuf sed." 



141 



KINDREE. CARL L. 

"She's a i iii koo 



Julj 9, 1892, saw 

Matriculated 

Cayuga High School, 



the happj event in 

with honours from 

and started hi^ bril- 



liant career undei J. P. Hennessy, Hamilton. 
Under his present vocation he lias ever been 
successful. \ g I companion and room- 



LAPP, R. E. 

"Always on the last lap." 

Started troubI< in this world in 1892, in 
Toronto, always a little over-confident, but 

nevertheless usually just makes it. Just put at Belleville, Ont. Matric. and Senior leav- 
on another lap, Lapp. Student of O.C.P., ing at Albert College, Belleville. Sec. -Trias. 
'17-18. Ontario Baseball Club for last seven years. 

Plavs most sings some, studies least. Pharm- 
.u y, '18. 



LA VOIE, MORRIS R. 

"Of making many books there is no end, and 
much study is a weariness of the flesh." 

Fust saw the light of day on Oct. 1, 1892, 



LOVE. CLIFFORD A. 

• Iters hail th 
I'll not get »/• till 

July 31, 18 well do 

apprenticeship with Mr. 
tow n. I hit All, n,l, ,1 ( I 



e rising sun. 

done." 

I remember. Si 
P. Bawden, Ridge- 
C.P., 1917. 






McF.LCHERAN. E. G. 

as old as the heart 

oj man." 

ked linn-, li into this « earj « oi Id just 

i ntj one years ago, in Hamilton. [11-health 

om going oveiseas in his unit 

and hi thus i ami to enti i Phai macj . '17-18. 



McILRAITH, JOHN H. 

"A little t ussing now an J then 

Ts relished hy the best of men" 

First broke his shell in Gromoity (some- 
where in Ontario). Fluttered to Durham. 
Matriculated from 1). II. S., '13. Apprentice- 
ship started at Durham, interrupted by enlist- 
ment in the army. Contracted pneumonia, 
which resulted in civil life and O.C I'., '17-18. 



McMAHON. EDWARD D. 

"Out Irani the mountains ami the mines. 
Into the lands of eilies fine. 
\l v studious footsteps d a 

But back to aoad ahl B.C. foi me. 
When I hare attained the Phm.B." 

X.li. The only man from British Columbia 
attending Pharmacy, 1917-18. 



McMURTRIE. ALEXANDER D. 

"I'll be merry and tree; 
I'll be sad foi 
li nobody i ares for me 
I'll care 

Born in Sarnia, '95. Matriculated from 
Sarnia Collegiate Institute, 1911. Enter* 
prenticeship with a prominent Sarnia drug- 
gist, 1913. Attended Pharmacy, 1917-18. 



142 







MARTIN. E. DAWSON 

"And what we have been makes us what we 



MASTRON. VICTOR 



7 have not much hai 
But do not despair. 



Born in Petiolia, February, 1897. Matri- 
culated at Watford High School, 1913. Served 



MEEKER, WILLIAM S. 

"Hello girls. 
Born in Whitby, <)nt\, \o\ 



9, 1897. Ma- 
Born May eighteen, year eighteen-eighty-nine triculated from Whitby Collegiate Institute 
hi the country which 1 am proud to call mine, and apprenticed in his home town with Mr. 

four years' apprenticeship to the drug trade In the beautiful land where pun- Latin blood A. II. Allan. Entered O.C.P. in the fall of 

in Sainia. Entered Pharmacy, Term 1917. flows. I'M". 

Tin greatness of which very seldom one knows. 



MEIKLEJOHN, ROSS McG. 

"Nature made him what lie is 
.In, I ne'er made such another." 

Born and educated in Tweed. Entei ed 
drug business in Peterborough, coining to To- 
ronto in spring of 1916. O.C.P.. 1917-1918. 
1 1 is time is in »t his own." 




MITCHELL. OMAR M. 

"Swaying the hickory foi a time, 
Then to banking idly went. 
From that to wielding pestles belli 
To which I find myself content." 

Born Tune loth. 1892, in Township of 
Sunnidale, County Simcoe Normal entrance, 
Stayner, 1911. Pharmacy. 



MOIR. GILBERT S. 

"Patience waits the destined, day, 
Strength can clear the i umber' d way." 

Born in Ramsay, Ont. 

.Matriculated at the Almonte High School, 

1906. 
Entered the O.C.P., 1917. 
Treas. for the Year 1917-18. 



MULDOON. KATHLEEN 

"She hath a glowing heart, 
Though cold her seeming be." 

Our Irish Kathleen claims Ayton for her 
birthplace, matriculated from Riverdale High 
School, Toronto, spent the four weary years' 
apprenticeship with J. A. Austin. Her 
hobby — Diplomas. Ma\ she succeed at O. 
C. P. this '18. 



O'CONNOR, JOHN A. 

"He loves a ioke, a quiet smoke, 
. In, I friends to call around." 

Horn May 9, 1895, and hails from Ottawa, 
where he started liis carei i as a Pharmacist. 
Took an active part in the athletic life of 
the Capital, and lias won considerable repute 
.i- .i paddler. Pharmacy 



143 



31111: SHE: 







■sb 









O'TOOLE. THOMAS P. 

"Large in stature, broad in mm, I, 
He is one oj the right kind." 

Born Au-. 30th, 1895. In the well known 
town oi Arnprior he started along the flower) 
paths "I knowledge and now is on the la-t 

lap nf liis rdniM Pharmacy. 



PRESTON, ROBT. R. 

" Levigation , elutriation, trochiscation, 
(llegation, percolation and filtration, 
.lir tin- cause of perturbation, 
Prior in examination." 

Matriculation from Riverdale Collegiate. 
Robert entered apprenticeship with the Owl 
Drug Stores. Now at Pharmacy In- hopes to 
become more skilled in dispensing "secundum 
art em." 



PULLEN, E. 



'Wht 



Horn some twenty-one years ago and 
straightway forgot to commence his biography. 
Therefore this had to be made out for him. 
Served apprenticeship with Frank Hyde, 
Woodstock. O.C.P, ' 1 7-1 S. 



ROGERS. STAN. W. 

"O Joy ■ < ' B 
Where do we go from het 

Jan. 26, 1SV3. was tlie lucky (?) .lax. at 
London. Out. Matriculated at Listowel. 

Worked the most enjoyable four years of my 
uneventful life at 590 College St.. Toronto. 
Pharmacy. 




ROSS. H. C. 

B fa; "i ites 

If ill,- right kind." 

Mad,- a terrible racket som< few summers 

however managed to serve Ins appren 

ticeship and entered Pharmacy in the cours' 

ot time. Strong on football and a few othet 

things. O.C.P, 'IMS 



ROTHBORT, ISRAEL 

"Cogito ergo sum." 

Natal day, Feb. 12, '94. 

Matric Collegiate of Grodno, domains of 

the late Czar. '10, where Pharmacol edu- 

• it urn commenced. 
Braved tin seas and reached "Queen City" 

Sept.. '13. 
Treasurer T.H.S.A., '16. 



ROY. JOSEPH A. 

"/ /mi./// ii Utile." 

May 1'). 1895, saw the notable event at 

Ottawa, i hit, Matric. at Ottawa Collegiate 

Institute. Joined King's Forces Aug 30, 
1915. Pharmacy. 



SARGENT. HUBERT G. 

"Ilis looks do a,-! belie him 
Full well In- tills Ins chair." 

This wee bundle arrived in Kingston, May 

11, 1894. Matriculated from K. C. 1 
Sieved apprenticeship with a brother. T. II. 
Sargent. Kingston. The Limestone City must 
contain some strong attraction for "Pat," 
since it lias been the scene of bis activities 
until coming to O.C.P., '17-18. 



144 




SCHMIDT, ARTHUR H. 

" . . . . Chemist, 
.1 connoisseur of fumes and odors." 

Born Nov. 6th, IS94. at Rodney, Out. 
Graduate of Dutton 1 1 i s-fli School. Drug ap- 
prenticeship served with E C. Harvey, St. 
Thomas. Out., 1913-17. Sec. T.A.Y.P.A., '15 
and '16. Very popular in numerous musical 
circles. Pharmacy. 



SHARP. HEWSON C. 

"Sharp by name and sharp by nature." 

Sept 111, IS'id. brought a glorious surprise 
for the citizens of Jarvis, Ont. Early educa- 
tion lure. Matric. 1913, Caledonia. At once 
began to master li is chosen art, in Jarvis 
Later, migrated to Chatham and London. 



SHIELDS, A. T. 

"My kingdom foi a shield, 

Twenty-one years ago raised an 
and still shows his athletic spirit. 
active part in Pharmacy sports in 



u fill fuss 
Took an 
'17-18. 



SMITH, GEORGE C. 

". \nd w/ .'/ such fas 
He never found the 

Born in Elora, "City of 
received Ins preliminary ed 
town, matriculating in 19 
i ici ship Welland, finished 
• ami popular Presiden 
( lass. 



tidious taste 
best too good 

Rocks," 1896, Carl 

ucation in his home 

13. Began appren- 

Toronto. Be 

i Hi. '17 -IS O.C.I'. 




% 





m 



SMITH. HAROLD 



STUART. MELVIN 



SUTHERLAND, ROBERT R. 



"Along the cool sequestered paths oj life 
lie keeps the even tenor of his way.". 



TAYLOR, ELMORE D. 



■Times change, "It's nice to get up in the morning, When you read a biography, remember 

Friendship never." />',,/ it's nicci to lie in bed." the truth is never fit foi publication. 

Born Cupids, Xil.l. Began Ins vocation at Born, 1893, at Stamford, Ont. Entrance, Firsl sav, the light of daj in Dorchester, Ala. I. an awful fuss on Lhc 7th .lax ol 

St. John'-. Thence pursued it al New Glas- I Matriculation. 1911. Apprenticeship, Ont., April 19, 1896. Education attempted at August. 1892, in the hamlel of Brantford 

s-ow an. I Glace Hay. M.S. o.C.I'.. '17-18. 1913-17. Pharmacy, 1917-18. Cngersoll and Woodstock. Matric in Forest, Maine. I'.. C. I., 1913. 

'l.C Four wars of pill pounding in London, Pharmacy, 17 'is 

i i. n 



145 



m 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 




TITUS. GLADYS 

"The Glad Girl." 

Glad chose Trenton as the scene of her 
activities, where slu matriculated 1913. To 
U better than other mere mortals she decided 
in be a Phm.B., so registered at O. C. P. 
for five years of slavery, which, howevei 
didn't take roses from her check-.. Here's 
bi st of luck to out Glad Girl. O. C. P. '17-'18. 



UMBACH, ELTON 

"His firm resolve was never known to sway, 
He kept the noiseless tenor o) his way." 



UPSHALL. A. W. 

". / man of many 
and 



linds 



Maj I "tli. 1894, -aw the auspicious event 
at Waterloo, Ont. Matriculated at Kitchener, 
but as his forefathers left their settlement for 

peai and justice a century ago, so also did he entered O. C. P. '17 
make lus flight from places lie thinks are 
certainly not in the right 



Twenty-two summers and still able to for- 
get. Can you heat it? This biography of 
course was written by an old maid. Served 
his apprenticeship in several places; finally 



WALLACE. WILLIAM H. 

First saw the light of daj 
Aug. 11. 1896. Attended B 
triculated from Kitchener < 
Apprenticed to W. C. Ave 
tended < >. ('. P. 1917-18 



in .Midland. Ont., 
eeton P. S. Ma 
.' I. June 2, 1913 

iv. Toronto. At- 



/: 











WELSH, DONALD H. 

"I. ate, laic. so late, hat we 



WOOD, ALBERT S. 

still." ".I smile iliai bubbles from a heart 

That loves his fellow men." 

Began his earthly investigations in Corn 
wall. Educated and served apprenticeship in 



Don blew into Picton April, 1895. Gradu- 
ated from I'. ('. I. 191.!; started his appren- 
ticeship in sami town, later moving to I'.elle- 

ville and thence to Toronto. January. 1916. same town. (). (' P. 1917-1N. Hobbies 
O. C. P. 1917-18. dancing, women and shows. 'Let's go." 

"You said something." 



146 




The Ontario College of Pharmacy 



147 




NS 




Hit 




L50 



To the Graduating Class of Veterinary College 



B3) Principal Grange 



I n c< immencing the prac 
tice of Veterinary Surgery 
it is essential that the sur 
n lundings of the practitioner 
should be scrupulously clean 
and everything tidy. 

All instruments should 
be of the best quality and 
mi 1st approved m< (dels ; 
medicines used in practice 
should always be of superior 
quality. 

hi order that the practi- 
tioner may keep abreast with 
the times, the best veterin- 
ary journals should be on 
his desk within convenient 
reach, and veterinary text 
hooks in plenty be on his 
library shelves, all of which 
should be carefully studied 
front time to time, and thus 
help \< 1 defeat the chance 1 if 
his becoming a derelict. 

It would no doubl he to 
the practitioner's advantage 
Principal Grange <,, b ecome a member of a 

Veterinary Association having for its object the elevation of the 
standards of all things pertaining to veterinary science; the 
improvement of its members and the welfare of the public, as 
well as the courteous consideration of fellow practitioners and 
patrons of his calling; indeed, the ethics of the Association 
should he such as make for all things of higher order. 

lie should take a wholesome interest in all public affair--. 
especially those of local interest, and thus help to hear his share 
of the burdens of good government. 

Young men practising Veterinary Surgery should keep in 




mind that they are in close relation to one of the great founda- 
tion-stones on which the prosperity of this country is being 
built, viz.: the live stock industry; take, for instance, the trans- 
portation question and try to estimate the value of the horse in 
the present world crisis alone, and one will at once see the enor- 
mous importance of his health and general welfare in carrying 
forward the movements of armies and their supplies. 

Even the dog, which is often looked upon as a mere compan- 
ion, yet if we follow his trail we will find him guarding herds 
and Hocks with intelligence bordering on the human, and going 
further afield we find him doing his hit with equal intelligence 
on the battle En int. 

Then there are the bovines and other domestic animals, whose 
health depends upon properly regulated veterinary hygiene and 
other branches of veterinary science, in a similar way to that 
in which the human family depends upon the medical profession 
for its care and general comfort. 

That the live stock industry has a very important bearing 
upon the life and activity of the human race may he illustrated 
by a few published figures of the consumption of meat per capita 
in different countries previous to the present war. 

In Great Britain, for instance, the consumption of meat per 
capita was 120 lbs. annually; in Germany, 113 lbs.; in France, 
SO lbs.; in Belgium, 70 lbs.; in Austria-Hungary, 64 lbs.; and in 
Russia, only 50 lbs. Crossing to thi^ side of the Atlantic, we 
find the average consumption for each individual in Canada is 
175 lbs.; in the United States 186 lbs.; but in Australia the 
amount consumed is far beyond any of the other countries above 
mentioned, where it is estimated that 260 lbs. is consumed by 
each individual yearly. 

With figures like those quoted before us we may begin to 
realize some of the responsibilities of present-day veterinary 
science as compared with the time when hygiene as applied to 
health of food-producing animals was not seriously considered. 
Indeed, if we multiply the above figures by the number of 
the inhabitants it will produce results in pounds that in the 
words iif the late haul FCruger "would stagger humanity." 



152 





BALDWIN. CHESTER H. 



'Mode 
One 



:t and silent 
veak chirp is 



is he as 
his onl\ 



note 



First chirped at Dolston, Out.. May 7, I 
Dolston Public School; Craighursl can 
swer for his skill ih a builder. Cornc 
Craighurst orchestra. A faithful student 
a good husband. 



BARLOW. 

"Think tehe 

oli. what , 



BRUCE E. 
re he's been, 



nai 



the 



think 



etc 



what he'i 
he'll me 



For several years Bruce was a rancher in 
the West, but forsook the lariat for the lancet 
in 'IS. 'rook prominent part in athletics. 
Specializes in Surgerj 



BOAST, 



CHARLES 

"Still water runs 



deep." 



Horn Nov. 9, 1895. Mati iculate.l at St. 
Francis ( ollege, Richmond, P.O. Class Sec- 
retary, 'In. Torontonensis Committee, '17. 
Came to the O.V.C. in search of higher 
knowledge ami to master Veterinary science. 
Well and creditably lias lie attained the goal 
that lie sought. 



BOYES. N. R. 

"Surely, surely, 

l, >il." 



Ross made his first public 
Ottawa, hut after growing w 
tin Capital, migrated to Nova 
ed the O.V.C. in fall of 191 
some day he might become a 
inai ian. 



slumber is more dear limn 



appearance m 
eary of life at 
Scotia. Enter- 
5 in hope that 
qualified Vetei 




BURKE. THOMAS S. 

"His ready Irish wit and smile 
Do all the girlish hearts beguile." 

T. S Burke, horn, yes thanks, 1888. South 
March claims the right to go into the archives 
of history as his birthplace. Tom tried wheat 
farming in Sask., with success, but decided 
Veterinary Science was his vocation. Chair- 
man of Social Committee. Member and offi- 
cer in the Fiat. 



CAMPBELL, ALEXANDER McG. 

"Well armed with mighty arguments." 

The greatest event in the- history of Fio- 
bisher, Sask., was the arrival of A. McG., 
1895. Upon reaching the years of discretion 
he saw the need for good Veterinarians, so 
enrolled in Class '18. Ifis services will doubt- 
less he an honour to the profession. 



CHAMBERS. ALEXANDER 

"Being good is an awful lonesome job." 

Arrived at Treherne, Manitoba, 1893. For 
several years he did a small boy's duty on 
his father's farm. Later decided to take unto 
himself a profession, so entered O.V.C. in 
1915. Member of the Y.M.C.A. Committee. 
Favorite expression— ''She's a hum-dinger." 



COBB, BRUCE E. 

"While it was yet early he arose and went 
to a far lecture." 

lie came from Pciin , U.S.A., accompanied 
by his spouse and spice. While here we 
found him a very industrious student — pos- 
sess, -,1 a special affinity for blackboard erasers 



153 
















COLEMAN, GEORGE COLEMAN, NORMAN J. 

I his best friends he was well known." "He loved music, also beauty." 

North Sydney, Cap< Breton, N.S , saw him Horn and educated at Foiester's Falls, af- 



CRAWFORD, NELLES M. 

"Girls, girls, girls, beginning and ending 
with girls." 



f 



CURDT. CLARENCE G. 

"./ prince among good fellows." 
"Honas" gleaned his education in a prairie 





CURRIE, A. D. 

"Smile and : with vou. " 

Firs! smiled in Painswick, near Barrie, 
Deci ill" i. '92. Earlj education received there, 
.11 Dalston I ollegiati Wandered over 
tin- Prairie Provinces foi several years. In 
1915 registered at O.V.C as a Freshman. 
\i t was slow to angi i . but then is a limit 
□ ill things. 



DAVIDSON. WALTER B. 

"Give to the world the best you hare and 
the best will i ome back to you." 

Walter hails from Neptune, Sask. Born in 
U.S.A., but migrated to Canada at an early 
age. Specialtj is boxing. Entered O.V.C, 

Class 'IT. but saw the folly of his ways and 
wisely decided to cast his fortune with 

(lass 'IS. 



ECKERT. EDWARD M. 

"Marl; well this youth. 
He's little, but oh my!" 
Eddie first demanded a hearing in Sebring- 
ville. Matriculated from Stratford C\ I. 
Later spending two years at Western Univer- 
sity. In fall of 1914 he decided that the 
lowi animals needed his services, so entered 
O.V.C, and after two years in 1T7 and one 
in practice, expects n> graduate with ITS. 
Vet, Representative on Torontonensis Mem- 
I" i of Fi at. 



he had few equals.' 



EVERETT, P. G. 

". Is a ftin-makei 

Simcoe is his home. Entered O.V.C. in 
1915 as "Charlie Chaplan" in disguise. lie- 
fine entering hi- Senior year he took unto 
himself a better half. Member of the Fiat. 
Percy tried his luck in the snlky this past 
summer with great SUCCi SS, 



154 




FERGUSON. CHARLES D. 

"Much may be made of a Scotchman 
if he is caught young -alas.'" 

From Woodstock College he came like a 
lion, but in time lie ceased to roar, ami was 
then always willing to lend a helping hand. 
In his final year he held the important posi- 
tion of "Class Cop" His future looks bright. 



FOREMAN. OSCAR H. 

"// you can't figure it out, ask Oscar." 

Born in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., 1892. 
Educated there and at Red Deer, Alta., where 
his home now is. Took preparatory course 
at Alta. Agric. College before coming to O. 
V. C. Has many friends; was Pres. of 1st 
year ; won scholarship in his 2nd Remember, 
Oscar, that a moustache is a young man's 
own fault. 



FURNEAUX. JOHN H. 

"flic only way to have a friend is to be one." 

It was Jack's lot to have Newfoundland as 
his birthplace, and while receiving his educa- 
tion at Bishopfield College, In- caused the 
Headmaster a great deal of anxiety and the 
loss of many w : ooden spoons. He is a member 
of the Omega Tau Sigma. If there is one 
hobby of Jack's, it is Tobacco. 



GAMMELL. D. T. 

"On with tltc dance, let joy be 



unconfined 



llainct, Vermont, claims this stalwart son. 
Educated at St. Johnsbury Academy Has 

lately fallen victim to a malady which takes 
him frequently to the hospital. Keeper of 
Records and Seals of the Omega Tan Sigma 






GRUER. DANIEL 

"It's in,e to iter up in the morning, 
But it's nicer to lie in bed." — Lauder. 

Arrived at Aubrey. Quebec, Oct.. 1894. His 
early education was received at the Aubrey 
School. Later studied two years at Mac- 
Donald Agric. College. His aroused interest 
in animal welfare is responsible for Dan's 
presence among us. 



HALBERT, S. FREDERICK 

"1 never felt the kiss o) lo; e. 
Nor maiden's hand in mine.'' 



Fred blew into Markdale i 
received his early education. 
1915 entered O.V.C. "Fish," 
times called, is an admirer 
His chief hobby is Football. 



i '94 ; here he 
and in fall of 
as he is some- 
of Pure-breds. 



HEPPLESTON, JOHN W. 

"It's all off' What: 
The hair of his head." 

Native of Yorkshire, Eng., crossed the Briny 
in '07. Trainer and exhibitor of "hackneys 
and hunters" for several years. Pres. of 
O.V.C. A. A. in Freshman year. His genial 
nature lias brought him many friends and 
"dates." 



HODGSON. JOSEPH W. 
"Another of these students . . . but a 

merrier man 

Within the Inmi of becoming mirth." 

Born at Hanover. Out.. April IS. [879. 
Received instruction. etc., in Strathcona 
School, Owen Sound. An enthusiastic and a 
diligent student of the live stock industry. A 
true friend of our dumb creatures. Member 
Omega Tau Sigma 



155 







HORWILL. MARK H. 

"Though vanquished, he would argue still." 

The subject of our sketch is another of 
England's suns who left the Motherland to 
play his part of the game in Canada. After 
several years spent in Sask., he came to the 
O.V.C. Always took a prominent part m 
military matters. His adopted hobby was 
boxing. 



HOSKIN. K. LAVERN 

"Good studentship means good < itisenship." 

Verne has been a s tlCKl i as well as an 
Academic success. First made his cry for 
purr food iii '95. After leaving Collegiate he 
followed hanking for two years, but, hoping 
to some day have "money" of his own, east 
his lot witli (lass 'IS. Deeply interested in 
fox farming. A typical grandfather's boy is 
our Verne. 



HOWELL, HAROLD 

" // is ".</ growing like ■/ h ee 
hi hull:, doth make man better be." 

Harold first lug. m wielding Ins lists in 
Vernon, (hit . and after being safely piloted 
through the perils of childhood, entered 
Queen's in the Art course, later entering the 
more congenial sphere of Vets, in Class '18. 



KOCH. GEORGE E. 

".hiil the muscles oj his brawny anus 
.lie strong as iron bands." 

Born at Edwardsville, Illinois. Dee. 2. 1893. 
Educated at Edwardsville High School. Took 
up farming and stock-raising at Stiathmore, 
Alta. Studious and athletic. A scienced 
\\ restler. 






LAY, GEORGE 

. ery man thine ear, but few thy voice 

Georgi ".is born at Edmonton, Aha. 1893, 
Befori entering upon his course at O.V.C. he 

attended scl 1 at Alameda. Sask Acted as 

Vice-Pres. of Athletic Vssoc. Ilis classmates 
all join in wishing hii tcci >s in his chosi 

pi , if ssii "' 



McCABE, WILLIAM J. 

"Often called, hut seldi 



in (/els up. 



First gazed on this world July 1 J, 1889. 
Educated at Alliston. Joined the elass in fall 
of 1915. Favorite pastimes were "Fording," 
Theatres and Study, when the latter was 
necessary. Mis motto "Never do to-day 
what ean be put off until to-morrow.'' Here's 
wishing you succ ess. Bill. 



McKELVEY, SILAS A. 

"Much labour is a weariness to the flesh." 
Silas made his first public speech at Allis- 
ton m 1891, and some speech it was. Mac 
reci ived his early training at Sheldon Pub- 
lie School, and has since followed farming. 
with the exception of a few months at Or- 
angeville Business College. We have no doubt 
as to the brilliancj of his future. 



McKINNON. K. W. 

"Good Vets, are born, not made." 

Hampton. I'. K.I Mae says they grow a 
lot of good things there besides 'spuds." 
His cheerful, kindly disposition and love of 

animals, coupled with his fluency of speech 
and natural affinity for medicine and surgery, 
make Mac the Ideal Veterinarian. 



156 



MELANSON. JAMES T. 
"What is worth doing is worth Ji 



mij 



<ell." 



Digby, X.S.. claims "petit Jacques." 
Graduated from N.S.A.C. in 1915. Entered 
O.V C. during the fall of the =ame year. A 
good student, good thinker and a l;<m n 1 fellow. 
Our class pianist. 



MILLER. EDWIN L. 

"There stands the millet 



all alone by himself." 



June 3rd, 1892, at Boston, Mass., was the 
event. Matiiculated at Norwich University, 
Northfield, Vt. Three years he spent here 
studying Civil Engineering. Crossed the line 
in 1915 to attend the O.V.C. Member Theta 
Chi Fraternity. 



NOTTING. ERROL S. 



'He w 
With 



smile worth a fortune 
ighty little twinkle in his 



eye. 

Dartmouth. X.S , is bis borne. Graduate 
of the N.S.A.C. flis great interest in the 
live stock industry brought him to the O. V. 
C. in fall of '15. Junior Representative on 
Students* Council. Member of Social Com 
mittee. President of Science Association. He 
loved the ladies. 



PERKINS, R. W. 

'"/ shonlil worry." 

When "Josh" arrived in Centreville, N.P... 
bis father bought four cigars — one for each 
inhabitant. Previous to entering College In 
acted as J'a Perkins' coachman. Josh pre- 
fers the stimulatory method of treatment. 
\ i mngesl member of class 




Born, 1891, near Carlisle, Cumberland, 
England. Crossed the seas, 1904. Educated 
Simcoe High School. Went West, 1912, set- 
tling in Loreburn, Sask. Robby's perseverance 

will get him there, and bis geniality will 
make hint many friends. Pres. V.M C.A. 



i he will talk 
talk." 



how he -fill 



Born in 1882, at Padiham, Lancashire. 
Eng. Educated at Burnley Grammar School. 
Crossed the Pond in 1906. Homesteaded in 
the West, near Loreburn, Sask. Students' 
Administrative Council. 1918. A live-wire in 
looking after tin class welfare. 



SAINT. FREDERICK F. 

"Saint by mime, but not by nature." 

Ushered into a world of sinners Nov., '97. 
An inherited love for animals led him l<> the 
Ontario Veterinary College. Vice-Pres of 
Senior Year. Member Y.M C.A. Committee. 
Main hobby shows. 



SELLMAN. W. J. 

"All in all, he's a problem I,, puzzle the <le.il " 

Bill is proud to recognize Little Falls. 
U.S.A., as his birthplace, and Sept. 6, '94. a> 
the date In I 9 I 5 he first crossed the tana 
dian border and entered our class, since then 
we have always found him to be a true 
friend and a gentleman- what more need be 
said of our Most Worthj Master of the 
( 'mega Tau Sigma' 1 



157 





SHEPPARD. JAS. 

/ :// ,■ , ,j, h mail's 
judgment." 

Born at Damasc 
Damascus School, 
stoi k. Specialized 
Member of the < )m 



A. 

r ensui .'. but i esei ■ <■ th v 



is. Out.. Feb. 22, 

Enthusiastic over 

in Anatomy and I! 

ega Tan Sigma. 



1891. 

pi ize 

otany. 



SMITH. JOHN W. 

"1 on Cassiits has a lean and hungry look; 
He tlnnlcs too much — such men are danger- 
ous." 

I'cgan Ins career in Guelph, later moving to 
N i w market, from whence he came to join us 
in t'las> 'IX. After graduation he hopes I" 
he able to alleviate the sufferings of the lower 
animaK. IK has many fast friends in Class 
'IS. 



SMITH. WILLIAM 

"They go wild, simply wild, over inc." 

Pringhar, towa, was put upon the map 
189 . after proving worth mention bj being 
Bill's birthplace. lie attended II S. there. 
Later engaged in the animal husbandry in- 
dustry. Possesses faculty of making the most 
impractical sound plausible. Xo pluggcr. but 
always gets there. Master of Finance in 
Prat." 



STEEN, HARRY G. 

"//, is little, but he's wise, 
He's a ripper for Ins sice." 

Horn July. 1884. Educated at St. Amedee, 
I'.ii Hi was one of our country's pro- 
ducers, having successfully farmed for several 
years. Decided in 1915 to attend O.V.C. to 
enlarge his knowledge of live stock breeding 
Expert taxidermist. Sec'y Y.M.C.A. in Senior 
Year. 




STTNSON. IVY J. 

' the plain s did Ivy roam . 
. I ml i nil mar i a tale had he. 

I n his . ",n j,', killed man v a Inn se. 

While attending the < >. /'. ( '." 

Born at Harriston, lxx.x, migrated west to 
.i. later mov ing to Weybui n Sask 

I i I our class in fall of '15. Very in- 

dtfstiious student. 



VINING. ALONZO 

". / man of deep thought is ii man oj lew 

■Words. 
"I. on" was horn in Middlesex CountJ 
1891, where he was administered his early 
education. Being 
agriculture grasped h 
when he enlisted as .. 

Id- knows the pass-word, and his congeniality 
has won many friends, who anticipate for 
him a successful future. 



WALKER. EARL C. 

"The happiest life that ever was led 
Is always to court, ami never to wed. 

Born, 1896, at Bowling Green, Ohio. Gradu 



WEALE. OLIVER C. 

"Keeps Ins counsel, does Ins duty, 
decrees to friends, and loveth beauty. 

Began life's fitful fever on April 16, 1895, 



.111 [IMllUI 111^ Cllll V ~ » . V . . . " . . ,. TIT" »^,1 . \ 1-1 1 . r, .V 

bov of good physique atc nf B.G.H.S. Knows good points of our at Niagara Falls, tint. Educated at Duffemi 

is services until' 1915 friend "Equus;" hut prefers the "Hupp." School, Toronto. Spent a -hurt time in the 

i student of the O V t"' Popular with all. possesses push and tact in West. Came into the right profession m 1915. 



Worthy Master of Fral 



158 



SI m 




ZINCK, KENNETH D. 

"Man delights me not, nor woman neither." 

Ken early left his home, Lunenburg, N.S., 
for the busy West. He is a pioneer of North 
Dakota and Saskatchewan. His fondness for 
quadrupeds led him to O.V.C. Vice-Pres. of 
Y. M. C. A. during his Junior Year. His 
hobby — "Skating." 




VETERINARY COLLEGE 



M. C. A. EXECUTIVE. 



TOP ROW— J. E. Johnson, H. W. Nurse, W. C. Nichols, F. F. Saint, A. Chambers, T. If Heath, C. R P.oast. 
BOTTOM ROW— F. Humphrey. Treasurer; T. Robson, President: E. A. A. Grange, VS., M.Sc., Hon. President; L. T. 
Addison, B.A.. M.D., Representative on Board of Directors; S. II. Chase, Vice-President; H. (;. Stein, Secretary. 



1.-.9 




Ontario Veterinary College 



Ifio 




ONTARIO VETERINARY COLLEGE CLASS EXECUTIVE AND SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW— G. E. Lay, Secretary-Treasurer Science Association ; F. F. Saint, Vice-President Class ; A. McG. Campbell, 

Secretary-Treasurer Class; W. B. Davidson. Vice-President Science Association. 
BOTTOM ROW — E. S. Notting. President Science Association; E. E. A Grange, V.S., M.Sc. Principal; Ceo. A. Coleman, 

President Class. 



161 



Class 1918 History 



We came, we saw, we conquered. 

As the Graduating Class of the year L918 of the Ontario 
Veterinary College we offer no apologies. We never were a 
modest class and from the very first we aired our views freely. 
As is the custom with most freshmen during the extremely var- 
dant stage, we endeavoured to revolutionize things in general to 
our own dire satisfaction, if not to the satisfaction of others. 

Not after we had received a thorough hazing by our hated 
enemies of the junior year did our zeal in any way abate. How 
we were led, carried, pushed, dragged to the slaughter will go 
down, down the ages with us. To he liberally lathered with a 
concoction of axle grease, Jap-a-lac, neatsfoot oil and Le Page's 
glue, rolled in Royal Household, liberally besmattered with old 
eggs, can neither he forgotten nor forgiven. 

However, we still continued to flourish as of yore; even to the 
extent of receiving our introductory lectures i 11 Biology, with 
its numerous and heart-breaking branches. 

The organization of the (.'lass Executive put things on a more 
substantial basis, for we could then meet as a body to discuss 
plans for our protection against the marauding tribes of our 
upper classmen. A lew of the braver even suggested, in subdued 
whispers, retaliate in. 

At the first field meet our Class came into the limelight by 
cleaning up several firsts and seconds, one of our men coming 
within one point of the cup-winning senior. 

As a cla>s we showed evidence of becoming prominent botan- 
ists, differentiating almost without consideration between cruci- 
ferae and coniferae. 

Among other things, there filtered into our almost imperturb- 
able domes these fixed rules: Never butt into the dissecting 
room while the juniors are at work ; never try to tell all you know 
to a professor, especially if he be Scotch ; give the correct answer 
or none in a quiz; call a senior "Doc" and he is willing to die 
for you; never start a fight at the principal's door. 

During the year two of our men enlisted for overseas service, 
R. 1. Baker in the 180th Sportsman's Battalion, and Grant Roe 
in t'he R. C. 1). 

< >ur aspirations were high as we started in various directions 
alter the closing, wondering who should be the lucky practi- 
tioner who would receive our invaluable services for the summer? 



It was with glad hearts that we said "Hello" to the fellows 
when we came hack for our junior year. The old feeling of 
greenness was gone, as most of the boys had finished the five 
months with a preceptor and were "some surgeons." We had 
lost a number of men from our freshman year, including Xesbitt 
from Ottawa, the two who are mentioned before as enlisting for 
overseas service, and Cooney, who went down to the border to 
investigate the bacillus causing the Mexican trouble. We had 
gained one member from Class '17. 

The boys were at once eager to display their prowess on the 
"Freshies," and in later years will look back to the memorable 
scrap which took place in the fall of 1916 on the third floor. 
However, the "Freshies" were finally vanquished after a stub- 
born fight on the landing, and after an application of soothing 
compounds for head and face were marched to the City Hall for 
inspection by the "officials." 

The balance of the year rolled quietly by until near examina- 
tion time, when twenty-five of the boys of the third rear re- 
sponded to the call of king and country, and the excitement 
amongst the members of the junior vear was tense. 

When we returned to Toronto in the autumn of 1917 to re- 
sume our work at the College we did so with a greater confi- 
dence than we had ever experienced before. The most striking 
event of the fall term was the formal inauguration of the four-year 
course at the opening exercises of the College. A number of 
men, prominent either in University or Government life, were 
present, including President Falconer, Mr. R-odehouse and others. 

After due consideration of the course adopted by the Facul- 
ties of Toronto University and by the other universities on the 
continent, it was decided to forgo the athletic field day for this 
year. 

A trip to the Guelph Winter Fair afforded us an excellent 
opportunity to acquire useful knowledge on the subject of stock- 
judging", as well as some pleasure. 

We enjoyed the ready wit and constant good humour of Dr. 
Fitzgerald in Bacteriology. 

Each looked forward to his professional career with hope and 
a determination to be an honour to the veterinary profession. 
Time flew at an incredible rate, and before we realized it we 
were bidding good-bye to the dear old College forever. 



162 




Faculties of TKeolog^) 




BRUCE. C. LIONEL 

"Because the kiss the gave me, ere I fell, 
Sweetens the spirit still." 

London, England, heralded the advent oi 
Lionel. Latei entered the great Yarmouth 
Grammar School. Trinity welcomed him, 
A.I). I'M 4. and now he departs from our 
midst an L.Th. II. holds the positions of 
"Varsitj Rep." and '"Leader of the Opposi- 
tion," and we do nut doubt for a minute 
that they have qualified him for holj orders 
and matrimonj 



EMERSON. CHARLES E. 

"The mind's the measure oj the man." 

Born in London, England, and received 
rarly education at British School, Cambridge, 
and Lancashire. tame to the "Land of the 
Maple'* 1909, and ordained in the Diocese 
"I Algoma. Welcomed to Trinity in 1914, 
and. after working hard and conscientiously. 
he now leaves with Ids thirst for knowledge 
partially quenched, but still contending 
earnestlv for the Faith. 



PETTEM. HARRY A. 

"Surely not in vain 
My substance of tin- common Earth was ta'en 
And lu this Figure moulded." 

"I'et." landed on this sublunary planet at 
Lyn, Ont.. and liked it so well that he stayed. 
He has been Pres. of Miss. Soc, Director of 
U.S.A. and Vice-Pres. of tin- Athletic. We 
predict for him a great future, feeling sure 
that he will fill a pulpit with great weight. 



SLACK. ERNEST A. 



-A 



young man af fashion and figure 
and worth." 



E. A. tiist made himself heard in Wake- 
field, l-ng. Afterwards he hied him to Can- 
ada, stopping at Hamilton for a time, and 
finally landing at Trinity. He has been Prcs 
of the .Mis-.. Soc. Director of U.S.A. ami 
Vice-Pres. of the Lit. Possessing a cheery 
disposition and adaptability, his succi - 
life is assured. 




STENT. CLAUDE F. 



"There 
Rough 

< .i adual 
ley for a 

lie has bi 

position 
Soc, nun 
taken a k 



divinitx that s/m/>« 
them how wc will 



■nds, 



I in Arts in 1915. Taught at Rid- 

•ar and then returned for Divinity. 

een an energetic Leader of the Op- 

n the Lit., Pres. of the Theolog 

ibei of ih. Review Board and has 

it. -rest i,, College life. 



STUBBS. WILLIAM C. 

"He -.cos a man, take him for all in all. I 
ne'er shall look upon his like again." 

Received his early education at Collingw I, 

Ontario. Cam,, to Trinity in autumn of I'M 4. 
and lias shown himself a decided lover of 
hooks. II, il.us not confine his lovi to 

I ks, however, and we hope his course in le 

will have well prepared him for ITolj Vlatri 
moiiv and Holy Orders, both of which he 
cat nestl y desires 



Mil 






ATKINSON. LEVI E. 

"Stop not at six feet six or so aim hialic 
ever higher." 



BURNSIDE. ROBERT K. 

"Suaviter in nwdo, fortiter in re. 

Bob is a true son of Erin, possessing the 
fire and passion characteristic of his race. 
The Methodist Church will find him a pains- 



April 23, 1890, saw the auspicious event 
at Bethesda, Out. Matriculated at Markham 

High School. Treas. C. T. Class, '16 and taking preacher and a faithful pastor. 
'I". See'v Volunteer Hand. '16 Heading 
for the Ministry. 



HUNT. HERBERT J. 

Details and dates are meaningless here, 

In this wonderful book of unknowns: 
Km "11. J.'s" claim to fame, 
Say, "He just plays the game," 
Inter all the rest with his bones. 



MOORE, GEORGE W. 

In 191.1 George exchanged (lie Rose for 
die Maple Leaf. He possesses diligence and 
an untiring spirit, which are desirable quali- 
ties in a Methodist Minister. 




WALKER, EARLE H. 

"Keeps liis counsel, does his duty, 
Cleaves to friends and loveth beauty." 

Like a five-pointed star 

A boy at home — Prince Edward County. 

High School days — Albert College. 

A probationer — In Saskatchewan. 

College experiences — Vic. 

A Meeuister — The To-morrows. 



165 




VICTORIA COLLEGE CONFERENCE THEOLOGY CLASS EXECUTIVE, FALL TERM 1917. 

rOP ROW — (1 W. Moore, Missionary Representative; II. J. Hunt, Secretary; L. E. Atkinson, Treasurer; L. C. White. 

Students' Council : A. L. Spracklin, Athletic Representative. 
BOTTOM ROW I". G. Weir, President; Prof. A. J. Johnston, B.A.. Hon. President; R. K. Burnside, Vice-President. 



166 



■'■mm§m:M3m, 







I 



3 



DICKINSON. HUGH W. 

"Life is ii business.' 



GIBSON. W. 
"Virtue is like a 



rich stom 



best plain set." 



SIMPSON. ALBERT 

"Bv Gum! 



"Dick" claims St. Kitts, B.W.I. , as the 
land of his birth, but Montclair, N.J., as 
the land of "his choice." Congratulations 



Horn on the north-east coast of England. 
Came to Canada in 1911. Entered Wycliffe 



"Gibbie" came to us from St. Catharines. 

a native of Manchester. England. Won full 

colours for athletic prowess ; Secretary of 
Uick ! ! Treasurer of Mission Society, Direc- Students' Mission Society; Curator of College of a cold November morning. Somewhat of 
tor St Andrew's Brotherhood, and otherwise Chapel; Bantam student since I '»1 4. a philosopher; Jack of all trades; by prefer- 

generally useful. We will long remember his ence a Theolog. Sic "Simmy." 

"A-men Brother." 



WIDDOWS. ROBERT F. 

"Service is the measure of greatness." 

Bob came from England in 1*913, and since 
then has served the College on Literary So- 



via basement window in the wee small hours ciety and Athletic Executives, and the King 

with the Divisional Signal Company. Rheu- 
matism brings him back to civil life. 




WRIXON, WILLIAM F. 

"A man tie was, to all the country dear." 
Hails from "Merry England," where he 
made his first vigorous protest against the 
badness of the times April 14, 1891. Educ. 
St. John's Ang. Schools, England. Grad. Bib. 
Train'g Coll.. Edin. Sec. Lads' Institute and 
Gym., England. Wycliffe Coll, ITS. Dea- 
con, June 3, 1917. 



167 




WYCLIFFK COLLHCK .MISSION S()( ll'.TV EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

rOP ROW E. P. Wright, Vice-President; T. W. Jones. Assistant Secretary. 

BOTTOM ROW W. Gibson, Secretary; Rev. A. Simpson, Pies,, lent: 11. W. Dickinson, Treasurer. 



168 




WVCLIFFE COLLEGE LITERARY SOCIETY EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

rOP ROW — H. II. Marsh, 1st Div. Representative; J. T. Robins, Treasurer; P. V. Smith, Vice-President; D G. Atkinson, 

Curator. 
BOTTOM ROW R. F. Widdows, Secretary; V. G. Lewis. President; T. \Y. Jones, Assistant Secretary. 



16! I 




WYCLIFFE MAGAZINE EXECUTIVE, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW — H. Marsli, 2nd Associate Editor; D. G. Atkinson, 2nd Associate Business Manager. 

BOTTOM ROW— C. \Y. Lea, Business Manager; A S. P. W [house, Editor-in-Chief; E. P. Wright, Assistant Editor. 



170 




Social Service Department 



171 



Ye Honourable Calling of Social Service 



j. 

"Hang the Editor of 'Torontonensis.' ' 

That fervent ejaculation, emphasized by a yawn, escaped the 
Scribe as he reluctantly took off the cap of his fountain-pen on 
the first morning of the Christmas holidays. 

"Two essays, an investigation, and a questionnaire to keep 
you out of mischief during the past week; and now, lectures over 
and two days before the General Election, they expect to drag 
out of you a 'write-up' of three hundred words." 

As Bairnsfather's Bert would say, "It's the little things that 
\\ i >rrv." 

If. 

"Social Service," in the words of the official Calendar — an 
instructive annual publication of some literary merit, regarded 
either as "fiction" or as "miscellaneous" — "embraces the different 
tonus of effort either by the government or by private agencies 
and individuals, to improve living and working conditions in the 
community." 

"Community" may mean neighbourhood, municipality, prov- 
ince, the nation, or the world. Never have true Canadians more 
strongly emphasized the common interest, newer has humanity 
itself been more united, than now. when the world is divided by 
its most devastating war. It is not Co-operation, but Compe- 
tition, that has failed. 

111. 
'Idle finest Social Service being rendered to-day is that of the 
men who are "cancelling the militarism of our friends, the 
enemy" in the trenches of France and on the seas of the world. 



But, when the war is over and the destructive work is done, there 
will be the greatest constructive work of history for men and 
women to do. 

Alfred Noyes strikes the keynote of Social Service in "New 
Wars for ( )ld/' written in 1013:' 

"Peace? When have we prayed for peace? 

Is there no wrong to right — 
Wrong crying to God on high? 
Mere where the weak and the helpless die. 
And the homeless hordes of the city go by. 

Our ranks are rallied to-niedit." 



dill Time Students. 



First Year- 
Allison, Mary Laura. 11. A. 
Bell, Hazel 

Buckley, .Mrs. Clara Powel 
Burrous, Edith Luella 
Currie, Christina H. 
Davidson, Annie 
Ferguson, Margaret 
Geddes, Beatrice Ross 
Goforth, Paul, B.A. 
Laughton, Mary E., B.A. 

(Mrs. II.') 
Cowrie. Margaret L. 



Martin. Caroline |. 
Moss. Elizabeth fl. 
McFarland, Nellie L. 
Mcl'hedran. Mary Elma 
Scott. Mary Moore 
Sims. Lola. B.A. 
Sloane, Maria 
Wilson, Annie Linklater 

Second Year — 
Apps, Elizabeth. B.A. 
Chesnut, Effie C. 
Mabee, Florence II. 
Steward, Lulu 



172 




WOMEN STCJDENTS' ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL OF UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW Shirlej Saul, Helen T. Smith, Helen Carthy, A. Wood, G. Morgan. Miss Bell, Grace Brodie, Bessie Chant. 

BOTTOM ROW Miss Toomey ; M. Murphy, Treasurer; Charlotte Moss, Vice-President; Vera Sparling, President; Gladys Boyd, Secretary; 
Mabel Child, Corresponding Secretary; Alice Smith 



Women Students' Administrative Council of University of Toronto 



The Women Students' Administrative Council has jusi com 
pleted its second year. The purpose of the Council is to control 
all issues in connection with the women students of the whole 
University. The Council is composed of seventeen members. 
These are elected from University College, Victoria, St. Hilda's. 
Medicine, St. Joseph's and Loretto Abbey. Faculty of Education 
and Social Service Department. The representation on the 
Council is in proportion to the size of the College. 

Though a comparatively young organization, it has already 
effected several important changes in the activities of the women 
of the University. One of the most important of these has been 
the change in the control of the women's section of the "Var- 
sity." The offices of Women's Editor and Women's Managing 
Editor were created, the appointments to be made each year by 
the Council. The staff is assisted by an Advisory Hoard of men 
and women, appointed 1>y i heir respective Councils. The Council 



is hoping that in the near future the Caput will grant to the 
women equal representation with the men in all college activi- 
ties. 

During the war the Council has undertaken the organization 
of collections for the British and Canadian Red Cross from the 
women of the University. This year a concert was given by the 
Fruit Pickers under the auspices of the Council the proceeds of 
which were handed over to the University Base Hospital. The 
programme was contributed !>v the three camps of the Univer- 
sity Pickers — Beamsville, Winona and Oakville. The Council 
was also given a part of the proceeds from the ( >. T. C. concert 
for Red Cross purposes in recognition of the help given in the 
sale of tickets. 

It is expected that as the Council grows both in years and in 
influence that the ultimate aim of welding the various Colleges 
more closely will he achieved. 



174 




WOMEN'S DRAMATIC CLUB. 
Laurie Mitchell, Jean Edgington ; Dorothea McFaul. Marion Squair. 



Women's Dramatic Club of University of Toronto 



The Women's Dramatic Club of the University of Toronto 
had ever since its formation in 1905 produced one of Shake- 
speare's comedies, but for the year 191-5=16 the Club decided to 
deviate from this straight and narrow path, and for the last two 
years has chosen the plays of R. Sheridan. 

The play undertaken by the Club for the year l ( d~-18 was 
"The Rivals." The parts were very evenly divided and every- 
body starred, from the sincere and trusting Julia to the ridicu- 
lously funny Bob Acres. The Production which is itself very 
comical. Dr. Kirkpatrick's clever and humorous interpretation 
of the characters, along with the natural ability of each indi- 
vidual member of the cast to portray her party, all combined to 
make "The Rivals" a huge success and to till the hall at each 
entertainment. The actresses decided that they had a very 
appreciative audience ("to put it very modestly), as the hall 
resounded continually with laughter during the performance. 

Although the aim of the Dramatic Club is to give the women 
students an opportunity to further and exhibit their skill in 
acting, yet the Club was glad to make a little money to give to 
the Franco-British Aid Society and the University Base Hospital 
and in this wav to do its bit. 



The Cast. 

Fag Freda Waldon 

Thomas Jean Edgington 

Lydia Nora Dignum 

I mcy Edna M itchell 

Julia Margery Talbot 

Mrs. Malaprop Dorothea McFaul 

Sir Anthony Absolute \gnes Muldrew 

Captain Absolute Mabel Child 

Faulkland Dorothy MacMillan 

Bob Acres .Marion Squair 

Sir Lucius ( )*Trigger Nina Milieu 

David Laurie Mitchell 

Maid \gatha Leonard 

Boy Mary Milieu 

Grace Wall 

Servants C]aire MiUar 



175 




STUDENTS ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW — F. M. Richardson, Dentistry; E. W. Brearley, Victoria; J. C. Hill. Medicine; A. 1-:. Rowson, Veterinary; 

R. <i. Johnson, Victoria; I., Halfyard, Victoria; A. M. Moore, University College; ('.. 11. Agnew, Medicine; B. V. 

Bradley, Medicine. 
MIDDLE ROW Collier C. Grant, B.A., General Secretary-Treasurer; W. C. Nicholls, Chairman Musical Organizations; M. 1> 

McQueen, Vice-President; Rev Sidney Childs, B.A., President; W. S. Watson, Chairman Literary Organizations; 

W. R. Sailer. Chairman Athletics and Discipline; W. L. Sagar. Recording Secretary. 
BOTTOM R<>\\ R. M. Robertson, University College; W. J. Gallagher, B.A., Knox; J. V, Bradshaw, Pharmacy; C. .1. 

McDougall St. Michael's 




EXECUTIVE OF INTER-COLLEGE DEBATING 



UNION ( )F T( iR( )NT( >. 1917-18. 
Qnivi r-.it \ ; W. S. Wats 



TOP ROW— E. F. Willis, Trinity College; A. II. Richardson, M.A., McMast( 

cil; .1. A. O'Biien, St. Michael's College-; E. P. Wright, Wycliffe College. 
BOTTOM ROW — W. .1 Browne, School of Practical Science, Vice-President ; Sir William Hearst, K.C.M G. 

dent; Sir Robert Falconer. LL.D., D.Litt., K.C.M.G., Hon. President; L. Halfyai.l, Victoria, President 

Osgoode Hall, Secretary-Treasurer. 



Studi nis' Cc 



Hon. Vice-Pn si- 
1. F. Lambicr, 



177 




VARSITY ST \i- 'F. 

rOP ROW .1. R. Hood, K M. Crosthwate, W. G. Colgate, J. A. Gibson, II. .1. Stewart, I.. II. McKinney, C. M. Luke, J. .1. 

Robins, C. J. McNamara, F. A. Silverman. 
SECOND ROW X. A. Weir, Miss K. O'Brien, Miss G. Bruce, T. R. \>..u.,u Miss l\ Kennedy, Miss A. Ganow, Miss B. 

Elston, II. G. Stapells, Miss M. Smith. Miss T). .Smith. Miss J. Edgington, .1. II. Trackman. 
THIRD ROV\ C. II. Weir. \V. R Salter. C. C. Grant, B.A., Miss B. Corrigan, B.A., R. A. Sampson (Editor-in-Chief), F. .1. 

Sullivan. Miss M. 11. McCoy, .1. A. Sweet, D. .1. Sinclair. 
BOTTOM ROW W. .1. Browne, T. M. Mungovan, T. G lie Hon. S. Eisen M. Spector, M. Horner, M. I. S:.,kes. 
ABSENT Miss E. Cringan, Mi^s Tremeer, .1. W. Tie.', R. ('. McLaughlin, !■.. O. Gallagher, W. .1. Petty. 



178 




FEDERAL CABINET UNIVERSITY 



IF TOK( i.\Ti 



TOP ROW— W. J. Gallagher, M.A., Knox College; V. G. Lewis. Wycliffe ; A W. Boyd, President Dental Executive; W. G. 

Woontmi. President Applied Science Executive; II. R. Kemp, B A., President F ( ). E. Executive; I. Robson, President 

Veterinary Executive. 
MIDDLE ROW M. J. Pfeffer, Chairman Administration; H. G. Stapells, Chairman Campus Service; I). O. Arnold. B.A., 

General Secretary; J. If. A. MacDonald Finance; G. Thomson, Chairman Community Service. 
BOTTOM ROW J. I!. Brodie, President U. C. Executive; H. G. Clark, President Medical Executive. 
ABSENT— W. F. Bowles, B.A., President; W. A. S Geddes, Vice-President ; E. W. McLeod, Recording Secretary; E. W. 

Brearley, President Victoria Executive ; R. E. Lapp, Pharmacy. 



17!) 




UNIVERSITY SERVICE USHERS, 1917-18. 

TOP ROW G. O. MacDonald. L. T. McNaughton, D. C. Munro, J. H. Ratcliffe, R. W. Wilkinson. 

MIDDLE ROW— A. MacGowan, M. Pfeffer, T. C. Clemence, J. S. Lapp, V. Voaden, A. M. Palmer, E W. Brown, I I 

Miller. 
BOTTOM ROW J. II V MacDonald J. G. Ballinger; D. O.Arnold, Secretary College Sermons Committei : W. G W Hon, 

ll> ad I ishei : II G. Clark, C II. Weir, T. F. Giffin. 



180 



The Melting Pot-- -An Innovation 



In previous years there lias been no such thing in the life ol 

this University as an inter- faculty entertainment. That there 
was a need Felt for some such institution is evidenced by the 
numerous expressions of opinion by members of the faculty and 
undergraduates in favour of an inter-faculty dramatic night to 
discover and give opportunity for expression to latent abilities 
in the student body. Much was said and little done until a 
prominent professor communicated his views on the subject to 
a small group of Y. M. C. A. men. who seized upon the idea and 
discussed its feasibility. From the discussion was born the idea 
of a great inter-faculty entertainment under the auspices of the 
Y. M. I'. A. Accordingly at the Canadian Student Conference 
held at Knowlton, Que., in June, 1917, definite plans were made 
to carry into effect the suggestions advanced. 

On the reopening of the University in September, Mr. Gordon 
Agnew of the Dental College, whose dramatic abilities are well 
known, was appointed to the position of manager-in-chief of the 
proposed entertainment, which was christened "The Melting 
Pot." To the hard work of Air. Agnew, ably assisted b\ Mr. 
G. C. Denton of Victoria College, is due in large measure the 
success of the performance, which was held in Convocation Mall 
on December 11th before a representative and appreciative 
audience. 

The programme was composed of six numbers and offered 
great variety in small scope. The opening skit was a minstrel 
show, "Singers of the Sunny South." a humorous and musical 
act by the men of University College assisted by Victoria College. 
Following this the University Orchestra appeared to advantage 
in several well rendered selections. Members of the Facultv of 



Education produced "An Exemplification of Modern Scientific 
Methods of Pedagogy," which contained humorous passages, 
and though quite evidently satire, was in some respects real 
istic. The Dental College sketch. "An Extraction Clinic in 
Texas," provided the audience with much food for laughter, 
when the united efforts of six men proved necessary to effect the 
extraction of one schoolboy's tooth, The University Octette, a 
new organization, under the leadership of Mr. I I. 1',. Martindale. 
B.A., rendered a vocal selection with tine effect. The closing 
number on the programme, "The Blow-up of Algernon Blow," 
was a short play presented by men from the kaculties of Medi- 
cine and Applied Science, and portrayed in brief and pithy scenes 
the unmasking of an arrant boaster. 

The organization and presentation of a new activity is always 
difficult, and Mr. Agnew deserves much credit for the initial 
success of "The Melting Pot." It was expected that there would 
he criticism, and in this the men behind the plan were not dis- 
appointed. Criticism there was, and some of it adverse. Mow 
ever, it was realized that perfection could not be attained in the 
inaugural performance of this new organization, and if the enter- 
tainment fell somewhat below the standard set. the organizers 
were able to glean many points for improvement from the critical 
opinions expressed. With these in mind and aiming to reach a 
still higher standard of dramatic production, the men behind 
"The Melting Pot'* feel that they can assure the undergraduates 
of belter and finer entertainments in succeeding years, and hope 
that in this effort they may have the hearty support not alone of 
the student body, but also of the Faculty. 



isi 




7I7' 4 '- 



Reo secret^, /T%r»AH-«. «. PKEsioEnr. 

Ne*M AN Club ° f ToR0NTQ &ecutive i^'' 8 



'MAN 



IN'J 



The Toronto Newman Club 



Since its establishment in 1913, by Mis Grace Archbishop 
McNeil of Toronto, the Toronto Newman Club, ( '7 St. Joseph 
Street, is gradually attaining the purpose set forth in the decree 
of His Holiness Pope Pius X. that, "in all dioceses throughout 
the world where there are public academies, colleges and univer- 
sities, let religious doctrine classes he established for the purpose 
of teaching the truths of our Faith and the precepts of Christian 
Morality to the youths who attend such public institutions 
wherein no mention is made of religion." 

In Canada and the United States there are similar societies 
in connection with about eighty seen'ar colleges. It is note- 
worthy that, in loving memory of that eminent Churchman and 
scholar, who labored so zealously for learning and for religion, 
no fewer than twenty-eight of these bear the name of the late 
Cardinal Newman. 

The activities of the (.did) are social, intellectual and religions. 
and during the scholastic vear of 1917 ami 'IX a very remarkable 
interest has been manifested. 

The spiritual and moral welfare of the students is the primary 
object of the institution. Mass is celebrated in the students' 
chapel every week day at 8 o'clock and on Sundays Communion 
is given at 9.15, followed by mass and a sermon at 10.00 o'clock; 
in the afternoon Benediction is sung. Frequent Communion is 
urged, particular stress being laid on the first Sunday of the 
month, when all the members approach the holy table in a body. 
The annual retreat given by one of the Paulist Fathers com- 
menced the first Sunday in Lent and was well attended. 

The Club is very fortunate in having a very energetic and 



efficient executive, and throughout the year the regular Friday 
night entertainments have been much a (predated. 

Noted lecturers, such as Dr. A.J. McDonagh and Mr. Lindsay 
Crawford, have addressed large audiences on current topics. Dr. 
F. Morrissey of St. Augustine's Seminary delivered a very in- 
structive course of lectures to the Medical students in particular 
on the "Ethics <>!" < )bstetrics." The notable attraction of the year 
was the concerts sung by the Paulist Choristers of Chicago in 
Alassev Hall under the auspices of the Club and in aid of the 
Sailors' Relief Fund. 

Three handsome stained glass windows were installed in the 
Chapel in the rear of the Club rooms in memory of Privates Paul 
McLaughlan, Vincent and (Jus DeFoe, who honourably fell on 
the field of battle. In honour of two of the most popular mem- 
bers. Sergeant E. F. Sanders and Private IT. Kellaher, whose 
deaths during the fad were keenly mourned, a similar installa- 
tion, donated by the members, will take place. In the death of 
Capt. E. J. Kylie the Club lost one of its truest friends and most 
energetic workers. Other casualties are: Lieut. A. M. Latch- 
ford, gassed; Lieut. Darcy Leonard, wounded, and Private VV. 
McNabb, wounded. Many of the members have received recog- 
nition for valour on the field of battle. 

The institution has only been made possible by the earnest 
co-operation of the Board of Governors and the Catholic laymen 
of the Province. A kindly interest has been manifested since its 
establishment by the majority of the Catholic societies, the 
benefit of their advice and influence being fully appreciated by 
the members of the Toronto Newman ('ltd). 



l.xn 



Menorah Society 



An innovation lias been introduced in the University of If the size of the audiences and the enthusiasm shown at the 

Toronto, namely, the Menorah Society, which is filling a long- meetings are safe criteria, then this, the youngest club and only 

felt need. The Society was founded on Oct. 11. 1917, and nth one of its kind at Varsity, is in a very flourishing condition. The 

cially recognized l>v the Caput "I" the University on Nov. 28. fact that Sir Robt. Falconer and Prof. W. R. Taylor are its 

The purpose of the Society is to study Jewish history and honourary president and vice-president respectively is sufficient 

culture and modern Jewish life and thought. The club is non- guarantee that its aims will, as far as possible, he carried out. 

sectarian and is open to the undergraduate body, graduates, and Lectures are delivered at each meeting by such men as Aid. 

members of the Faculty of all beliefs. It holds its meetings fort Louis Al. Singer, Sir Robt. falconer. Prof. < I. Al. Wrong, Prof. I. 

nightl) on Monday evenings at the University 'A'.*' Mavor, Prof. I). R. Keys, and main- others. 

Members. 

Borsook, H., '21 Gordon. Miss A., '19 Moss, S. I., '20 Slone, A., '19 

i',re,-;nian. 1',., '20 Granofsky, T. L.. '21 Orechkin, 1. \Y.. '10 Smith. Miss L. (".. '20 

r>romberg, A.. '21 Greenbaum, A., '10 Orechkin, S., '22 Spector, M., '19 

Chaikofr, S.. '21 Gurofsky, Miss C., '21 Pullan, M., '21 Stuchen, I. Al.. '21 

Eisen, Sol., '18 Jessel, L., '22 Rhinvine, A., '20 Sweet, J. A., '18 

Enushevsky, Miss I'.. I'.., '20 Keyfitz, 1., '10 Rotenberg, C. '19 Tobis, Miss T., '21 

Gellman, Al.. '20 Kuperstein, 1., '19 Rotstein, Al.. '19 Trackman. J., '21 

Genesove. E. j., '21 Lavine, !. |., '10 Schaft'er, I'.., '18 Waldman, Miss L.. '21 

Godelph, I!., 19 Levi. Miss \AL. '21 Schott, M., '18 Wladowski, Miss AL. '21 

Goldstick, Aliss J., '19 Levi, Miss R., '21 Shulman, Aliss E., '19 Wladowski, Miss R.. '21 

Golden, I. Al.. '22 Levinsky, Miss R.. '21 Silverman. 10 A., '20 Zacks, AL. '2d 

Markus, J., '20 Sireth, Aliss C., '21 

Associate Members. 

11. Pinkie. BA. Pro. J. G. Hume, Ph.D. Aid. L. M. Singer Prof. G. AL Wrong, M.A. 

J. Al. Gordon, P. A. Dr. A. Isaacson Dr. I,. L Solway 



LSI 




UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MENORAH SOCIETY EXECUTIVE, 1917.18. 

Sir Robert Falconer, Honorary President. 
TOP ROW— Miss M. Wladowsky, Meds. Representative; Sol. Eisen, General Secretary; A. Slone, Dents. Representative; F. A. 

Silverman, Arts Representative; S. Orechkin, Meds. Representative; Miss M. Levi, Arts Representative. 
BOTTOM ROW- Ali-s II. Enushevsky, 2nd Vice-President; J. A Sweet, President; M. Schott, Treasurer; Prof. \V. R. 

Taylor, M.A., Ph.D., Hon. Vice-President; II. Godelph, 1m Vice-President; Miss L. C. Smith. Recording Secretary. 
ABSENT S. Chaikoff, S. P. S. Representative. 



IS5 




VICTORY LOAN CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE. 

TOP ROW— G. W. Harris, Meds. ; W. Harman, S.P.S.; C. R. Hill, S.P.S. ; W. H. Harvey, Meds ; T. J. Ryan, Meds. ; 

C McLellan, Meds.; Smith, Wycliffe; Rep. of Meds.; W. H. Bouck, Victoria. 
BOTTOM ROW— Richardson, Dents; W. S. Watson, Trinity ; Arnold Ivey, Captain; Rev. Sidney Childs, President; Collier C. 

i.i. mi. General Secretary-Treasurer; J. Walker, Victoria; C. J McDougall, St. Mike's. 



lKti 



Alpha Omega Alpha 

Honour Medical Society. 
Alpha of Ontario. Founded Nov. 1-'. 1906. 



Fratres in Facultate. 



Alan I In >\\ n. M.B. 

A. Brodey, M.A., M.B. 

I. 1 1. Cameron. M.B., 1.I..I )., F.R.C.S. 
\\ . R. Campbell, B.A., M.B. 

II. K. Detweiler, M.B. 
W. E. Gallie, M.B. 

A. Hunter, A.M., B.Sc., M.B., Ch.B. 
G. W. Howland, B.A., ALU.. M.R.C.P 
A. W. Huntsman, B. V. M.B. 
A. II. Macallum, M.A., M.I'.., Ph.D 
A. B. .Macallum. |r., B.A., M 



I'll. I).. Sc.D., I.L.I ).. F.R.S. 
). 



J. J. MacKenzie, B.A.. M.B. 
~J. I'. McMurrich, M.A.. Ph.D., LL.D. 
A. McPhedran, M.B. 
J. A. ( >ille, .M.I). 

A. Primrose, M.B., CM. 
('. I.. Starr. M.B. 

F. X. G. Starr. .M.I'.. 

B. I'. Watson, M.D., Ch.B., F.R.C.S. 
J. ('. Watt, B.A.. .M.B. 

1). I. G. Wishart, B.A.. .M.I). CM. 



('. II. Archibald, B.A. 

1 1. II. Agnew 

I". J. Bell, B.A. 

R. I*. Cromarty, B.A. 



Fratres in Universitate. 



Y. B. 


Dowler 


N. X. Kirkup 


1. 11. 


Frb 


1). M. Low 


G. R. 


1 ). Farmer 


.1. I). MacDonald 


A. B. 


Holmes, B.A. 


I.. A. I 'equegnat 


G. S. 


Jeffrey 


R. W. Rankin 



J. R. Smith. M.A. 

( i. II. Stevens* ui, B.A. 

I. < i. Strachan 

C. i >. Young, B.A. 



ISS 



Omega Tau Sigma Delt< 



Honourary Members. 

J. \. Pringle, 1VT.R.C.V.S., B.V.Sc. 
A. Campbell, VS. C. G. Saunders, V.S., B.V.Sc. 

II. I). Nelson, V.S., B.V.Sc. 
F. W. Schofield, VS.. B.V.Sc. D. R. Caley, VS. 

S. S. Sisson, S.B., VS. 



Officers. 

\Y. J. Sellman, 'IS, Most Worthy Master 
E. V Walker, 'IS, Worthy .Master W. A. 'Smith, 'IS, Vaster Finance 

IK T. Gammell, 'IS, Keeper of Records and Seals 
S. M. Chase. '1'), Alpha Master T. S. Burke, 'IS. Beta Master 

J. W. Heppleston, 'IS, Master Portal 
( ). II. Foreman, '18,. Grand Councilman J. R. Fisher, '19, Grand Councilman 
W I I. Fitch, VS.. Grand Master 



W I). Baskette, '19 
G A. Coleman, 'IS 
C. G Curdt, '18 
I. II. Furneaux, '18 
W. M. Laughlin, '1" 
1. C. McConnell, '19 
W. A. Munson, '21 
I. A. Sheppard. 'IS 



Active Members. 

A. |. Andries, '10 
S.'W. Carter '1') 
\. M. Crawford, 'IS 
I'. G Everett, '18 
K. L. Hoskin, '18 
R. G. Caw. '2\ 
W. E. Nicholls, '19 
F. F. Saint. 'IS 
A. M. Vininsr, 'IS 



A. McG. Campbell, 'IS 
N. J. Coleman. 'IS 
!-".. M. Eckert, 'IS 
I. W. Hodgson, '18 
G. E. Lay, '18 
K. W McKinnon, '18 
I. B. Noble, '19 
H. G. Steen, 'IS 



189 



Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority 



Active 

Alpha De Pauw University 

Beta Indiana State University 

( ianmia Butler College 

Alpha Eta VanderbiH University 

Alpha Chi Purdue University 

Delta University of Illinois 

Tau Northwestern University 

Upsilon University of Minnesota 

Psi University of Wisconsin 

Alpha Pi University of North Dakota 

Alpha IV Lawrence College 

Eta University of Michigan 

Mu Allegheny College 

Alpha ( lamma Ohio State University 

\lpha Tau University of Cincinnati 

Alpha Omega University of Pittsburgh 

Iota Cornell University 

Lambda University of Vermont 

Sigma University of Toronto 

( hi Syracuse University 

Kappa University of Kansas 



Chapters. 

Rho University of Nebraska 

Alpha 1 1 it a Washing tun University 

Alpha Mu University of Missouri 

Alpha Rho University of South Dakota 

Alpha Upsilon Washburn ( College 

Beta Camma Col< »rad< i Agricultural ( !< illege 

Omicron University of S. ( California 

Phi Stanford University 

Omega University of California 

Beta Delta University of Arizona 

Alpha Beta Swarthmore College 

Alpha Delta G< mcher College 

Alpha Kappa Adelphi College 

Beta Beta Randolph-Macon Woman's College 

Alpha Theta University of Texas 

Alpha Omicron University of Oklahoma 

Alpha Phi Newcomb College 

Alpha Lambda University of Washington 

Alpha Nu Montana State University 

Alpha Xi Oregon State University 

Alpha Sigma Washington State College 



Sigma Chapter. 



"18 
Edith Alexander 
Gladys Elliott 
Elsie Graham 
Elsinore MacPherson 
Winifred Simpson 
Marion Squair 



'19 
Mary Anderson 
Freya Hahn 
Dudlev Martin 



'20 
Mary Brebner 
Doris Howell 
Helen Kirkwoi >d 
Marv Reid 
Edith Williams 



'21 
Freda Eraser 
Elizabeth McLennan 



Sorores in Urbe. 



Jane Anderson 

Edith Atkin 

I 'hvllis Anderson 

Alice Ball 

Marv Cowan 

Ethel Chalkley 

Kathleen Davidson 

I J lis McPhedran Fraser 

Jessie Ferguson 

Mabel Steele ( rrubbe 



Kathleen Gower 
Mrs. Gourlay 
Mrs. Gifford (Pi) 
Mrs. Hutchinson 
Edith Van der Smissen Hen- 
derson 
Marjorie Hall 
Elizabeth Hargreaves 
Mabel Hi neks 
Mrs. Jones ( Lambda ) 
Mary Kentner 



Erskine Keys 
Adeline Lobb 
Mrs. Lalor (Omega) 
Gertrude Lawler 
Kathleen Lang 
Marjorie Fraser Mutch 
Mildred MacPherson 
Claire Murphy 
Beatrice Millman 
Elspeth Middleton 
Mono McLaughlin 



( )live MacKay 
Agnes Muldrew 
Helen MacKay 
Mary Millichamp 
Frances Nichol ( Al 
Marjorie Reid 
Blanche Steele 
Jean Tom 
Helen Walton 
( iertrude Wrisrht 



>ha Gamma 



19(1 



Pi Beta Phi Sorority 



Founded 1867. 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 



Alpha Province. 

University of Toronto 
Middlesbury College 
University of Vermont 
Boston University 
Syracuse University 
St. Lawrence University 



Beta Province. 

( roucher College 

George Washington University 

Randolph-Macon College 

Hollins College 

John I!. Stetson University 

Swarthmore College 

Bucknell University 

Dickinson College 



Gamma Province. 

( )hi< i I miversity 
Ohio State University 
University of .Michigan 
Hillsdale College 
Franklin College 
University of I ndiana 
Butler College 



Delta Province. 

University of .Minnesota 
University of Wisconsin 
Lombard College 
Knox College 
Northwestern I niversity 
University of Illinois 
James Milliken University 



Iowa Wesleyan College 
Simpson College 
Iowa State College 
Iowa State University 



Epsilon Province. 

Lbiiversity of Nebraska 
University of Missouri 
Washington University 
Drury College 



University of Kansas 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
University of Arkansas 
Newcomb College 



Zeta Province. 



Eta Province. 



University of Oklahoma 

L T niversity of Texas 

Southern Methodist University 



I niversity of Wyoming 
University of Colorado 
University of Denver 



Leland Stanford Jr. University 
University of California 
University of Southern California 
University of Nevada 



University of Oregon 
Oregon State College 
University of Washington 
Washington State College 



Sorores in Universitate. 



'18 

Norma Arnedt 
Agnes Boyle 
Mary Fletcher 
Florence Flett 
Marjorie Fraser 
Dorothy MacMillan 
Norma Stuart 



'19 

Bertha Ferguson 
I Japhne Parsons 
Vida Peene 
Marie Peterkin 
Aileen Scherk 
Wilma Thompson 
Mary Walters 
Margaret Wilson 



10 



Vivien Chalmers 
Bernice Clarke 
Kathleen Cosgrove 
Jean McQueen 
Wilma Orr 
Frances Paterson 
.Margaret Ross 



'2\ 

Edith Barton 
Margery Gray 
[essie Rogers 
Mabel Wright 



Alpha Phi Sorority 

Founded 1872. 

Roll of Chapters. 

Alpha Syracuse University Mu Barnard College 

Beta Northwestern University Nu University of Nebraska 

< ramma De Pauw University \i Universit) of Toronto 

1 )eIt . a .Cornell University ( )niicn)11 University of Missouri 

Epsilon I n i versify oi Minnesota 

/.eta < ii mcher ( a >llege 

Eta Boston University 

Theta University of Michigan Sl & ma [ diversity ol Washington 

University of Wisconsin ' au l niversity of Oregon 

Leland Stanford |r. University Upsilon Washburn College 



Pi I 'ni\ ersity i if North i )akota 

Rho < >hio State University 



lota 

kappa 

Lambda University of California Phi University of Oklatu una 

Alumnae Chapters. 

Chicago Alumnae New York City Alumnae San Francisco Alumnae Wisconsin Alumnae 

Central New York Alumnae Southern Alumnae Southern California Alumnae Kansas City Alumnae 

Boston Alumnae Ithaca Alumnae Indiana Alumnae Philadelphia Alumnae 

Minnesota Alumnae Detroit Alumnae Columbus Alumnae Portland Alumnae 

XI CHAPTER OF ALPHA PHI. 

Sorores in Universitate. 

'18 '19 '20 

Edith Littlefield Marjorie Burgess Elizabeth Irwin Grace Adams 

Hilda P.est Velma Chambers Dorothy McCullough Shirley Saul 

Marjorie Buck Marjorie Cooper Florence Orr Evelyn Tudhope 

Jessie Lucas Willena Crawford Johanna Potvliet '21 

Myrtle Poag Jean Graham Pauline Simpson Frieda Breithaupt 

Jean Purclom Marian llarvie Marjorie Tolmie Mardette McMaster 

Isabel Tanton Ada Irwin Freda Waldon Helen Schell 

Sorores in Urbe. 

Annabel Auld Hilda Brown Anne Douglas Florence Lang Vera Parsons Ethel Stockwell 

Kathleen Baird Jean Bryce Marion l ; indla\ Mrs. Lloyd Ruth Potter I rene Trow em 

Mrs : Baird Josephine Carlyle Stella Fleming Margaret .McLennan Mrs. Rosebrugh Gladys Wood 

Mrs. Beaton Violet Carrie Zella Garvin Hannah Matheson Kathleen Russell Inez Wood 

[■Catherine Begg Gladys (otter Edith Grant Norma Mortimer Mrs. Hugh Scully Olive Ziegler 

Constance Dingle Mrs. Harris Mrs. Newton Mabel Stirrett 

192 



Delta Gamma Sorority 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Beta Washington State University, Seattle. Wash. 

Gamma University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Epsilon Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 

Zeta Vlbion College, Albion. Mich. 

Eta \kron .Municipal University, Akron, Ohio 

Theta University of Indiana. Bloomington, [nd. 

Iota University of Illinois. Urbana, 111. 

Kappa University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 

Lambda University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Minn. 

Mu University of Missouri, Columbia. Mo. 

Nu University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 

Xi University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

( hnicron \delphi College, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Pi University of Montana, Missoula, Mont. 

Kho Svracuse University, Svracuse. N.Y. 



Sigma Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. 

Tan I University of Iowa, low a City, Iowa 

Upsilon Stanford Unn ersity, ( !alifornia 

I 'hi University of Colorado. Boulder, ( '< il< >. 

Chi ( 'or n ell 1 fniversity, Ithaca. N.Y. 

I Si ( roucher G >llege, Baltimore, Md. 

( (mega I fniversity < if Wisc< msin, Madisi m, Wis. 

Alpha Beta Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Alpha Gamma University of 'Toronto. Toronto. Canada 

Alpha Delta University of Oregon. Eugene, ( )re. 

Alpha Epsilon Washington University. St. Louis. Mo. 

Alpha Zeta Lawrence College, Appleton, Wis. 

Alpha Eta Whitman College, Walla Walla. Wash. 

Alpha Theta University of North Dakota. N.D. 



Sorores in Universitate. 



'18 
I )( iris I )ignum 
Mabel Kilner 
Muriel Meek 
Marjorie Lee 
Muriel Lewis 
I lazel Stobie 
Muriel Sinclair 



'19 
Geraldine Brown 

Marjorie ( "ook 
Dorothea McFaul 
Josephine Wright 

'20 
Nora I )ignum 
Helen Fraser 
Margaret Kellam 



Francis ( )'] teir 
Margaret Pringle 
Phyllis Silk 
I )orothy Mc Lagan 
Irene Stobie 
Audrey Hewitt 

Pledges — 
'20. Helen Rankin 
'20, Isabel Fouin 
'21. lean In wood 



'21 
Gladys Billings 
Janet Bristol 
Isabel I learst 
Jean MacLaren 
Dorothy Tilly 
Audrey Young 

Meds.— 
Mildred Folinsbee 



Sorores in Urbe. 



Margaret Boyle 

Mary Boyle 

Marjorie Brigden 

Is< ibel Caldwell 

Kathleen Caldwell 

Audrey Cordingley 

Nellie Evans 

Dorothy Fen wick 

Mrs. Frances Webster Godfrey 

Helen I renning 

Violet I f viand 



Margaret Hanna 
Grace McCormack 
Edna Mitchell 
Anne McLaren 
Jean M earns 
Marie Parkes 
Aileen Silk- 
Margaret Scott 
Mrs. Justin Robinson 
Bade Robinson 
Mrs. i Dr. i Harold Mai 



193 



Beta Delta Pi Sorority 



Founded 1887. 



Alpha . 
Beta . . 

( iamma 
Delta . 
Epsili mi 
Zeta . . 
Eta . . . 



Lewisburg, I'a. 

Philadelphia, Pa 

New York 

. Stanfi >rd, G mnecticut 

Chevy Chase 

'eekskill-on-the-1 Unison 
.... I lollidaysburg, 1 'a. 



Chapter Roll. 

I let a 



Mi irrisii iwn, New Yi »rk 

[oto Atlantic City 

Lambda T( >n into 

Alpha Alumnae I 'hiladelphia, 1 'a. 

Beta Alumnae Shepherdstown, XV. Virginia 

Gamma Alumnae T< >r< into 



Muriel Hall 
1 sobel ( 'assidy 
I lei en Currie 



Sorores in Urbe. 

Gladys Angus 
Jessie Long 
Mrs. Ethel Vanstone 
Muriel Hall 



Vera Robinson 

Jean Bull 
Claire Stevensi »n 



Sorores in Universitate. 



i rs 

\ elma Manser 
Mary Corrigan 
< rladys Bruce 
Gertrude McTavish 
Marv White 



1T9 

Lorna \.\'ilson 
Mary Harvey 
Margaret McCoy 
Vera Mowry 



2T0 
Alice Connolly 
Elsie Macdonald 
Lena Pugsley 
Margaret McMillan 
Irene Madill 
Gladvs G >rless 



2T1 
Rae Wilson 
Marguerite Belton 

S. P. S.— 
lean Hall 
Meds.— 
Lillian Gradv 



104 



Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority 



F( mnded 
Chapter 



Phi Boston University 

Beta Sigma \.delphi College 

I >eta \lpha I university of I 'ennsylvania 

Beta tota Swarthmi »re College 

I 'si Cornell University 

I Seta Tan Syracuse I 'niversity 

Beta Psi Victoria College 

Beta Beta St. Lawrence University 

Gamma Rho Allegheny College 

Beta Upsilon West Virginia University 

Lambda .Municipal University of Akron 

Beta Mti Ohio State University 

Beta Rho University of Cincinnati 

lota De I'auw University 

Mu Butler College 

Helta Indiana State University 

Beta Chi University of Kentucky 

Beta Delta University of Michigan 

Xi Adrian College 

Kappa I [illsdale College 



1 8/1 ). 
Roll. 

Chi University of Minnesota 

Eta Universit) of Wisconsin 

Upsilon \i irthwestern I 'niversity 

Epsilon 1 1 line lis Wesleyan 

Beta Lambda I Iniversity of Illinois 

Beta Xeta Iowa State University 

Theta M iss< >uri State University 

( )mega Kansas Slate Universit) 

Sigma Nebraska State University 

Beta Mu Colorado State University 

Beta Theta < )klahoma State University 

I Seta Xi Texas State Universit \ 

Beta ( )micron Tulane University 

Beta Phi I niversity of Montana 

Beta Pi University of Washington 

Beta ( hmega University of ( (regon 

I'i University of California 

Beta Eta Leland Stanford Jr. University 

Gamma Alpha Kansas State Agricultural College 

Beta Kappa Idaho University 



1018 
\ i m McConnell 
I lelen St. John 

1919 
Alice I )unlop 
Kathleen Gundy 



Sorores in Facultate. 
Laura * )ckley I lelen Scott 

Sorores in Universitate. 
Agnes Jenner l n 20 

Margery Myers Helen Coatsworth 

Marion Percival Ruth Davison 

Myrtle Slater Mary Davis 

Katherine St. John Eleda Horning 

Dorothy Thompson Jean Hutt 

Joyce Kerr 
1 lelen Kirke 



Miriam Marshall 
Lucile Weber 
Xenia Knechtel 
Ruth Ratz 

1921 
Rosann >nd I h-nu m 



Sorores in Urbe. 



( rladys Burns 
Lily Denton 
I .aura Denton 
Phyllis Denne 
Mrs. Roscoe Graham 
M rs. I lorace Faull 
Caroline Guthrie 
Mary Holmes 
Alice Hamill 
Velma 1 lamill 



Mrs. C. D. 1 fenderson 
Renata Knechtel 
Mrs. O. C. Lailev 
Mrs. W. Lai ley " 
Winnifred Mason 
Grace Mathewson 
Mrs. Thornton Purkiss 
Mrs. 11. E. Ramell 
Muriel Wallace 



195 




& 



196 



THE members of the T orontonensis 
Board wish to direct trie attention of 
students and graduates to the advertise- 
ments herein, without which this publica- 
tion would be impossible. 



vr, 



. 



TOH¥E!RSHfT 



©I! T© 

HIT € 




@M¥@ 



LL 



WITH WHICH ARE /■' E /> E R . 1 T E /> 

VICTORIA AND TRINITY UNIVERSITIES AND 
ST. MICHAEL'S, KNOX and WYCLIFFE COLLEGES 



FACULTY OF ARTS 

Instruction in the courses leading to the degrees of 
B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., is given in the University, 
University College, Victoria College, and Trinity 
College. The Colleges provide instruction in the 
Classical, Modern and Semitic Languages and Liter- 
ature, Ancient History and Ethics- the University 
gives training in the remaining subjects of the 
Curriculum. 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

Complete courses of instruction with ample oppor- 
tunities for clinical training at the General Hospital, 
St. Michael's Hospital and the Hospital for Sick 
Children. 



FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

Courses of three years for the diploma leading, after 
an additional year's work, to the degrees of B.A.Sc 
and M.A.Sc. 



For information apply to the Registrar of the University, or to the Secretaries of the 

respective Faculties. 



198 



OK 



HVEESHTY 

B DII¥I 



off T©K©NT 

ITf COLILE€ 




WITH WHICH ARE FEDERATED 

VICTORIA AND TRINITY UNIVERSITIES AND 
ST. MICHAEL'S, KNOX and WYCLIFFE COLLEGES 




FACULTY OF FORESTRY 



Course leading to the Diploma anrl Degree. 



FACULTY OF EDUCATION 

Professional training for Public School, High School 
and Inspectors' Certificates. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 
Courses for Normal and occasional students 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICE 



AFFILIATED INSTITUTIONS 
The affiliated Colleges and Schools train Candidates 
for University standing in Dentistry, Pharmacy, 
Agriculture, Music and Veterinary Science. 



For information apply to the Registrar of the University, or to the Secretaries of the 

respective Faculties. 



I9!» 



::>: 



VICTORIA COLLEGE 

IN THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



OFFICERS 



Presid 



ent 



REV. R. P. BOWLES, M.A., D.D., LL.D. 

Dean of Arts Faculty Dean of Divinity Faculty 

J. C. ROBERTSON, M.A. REV. F. H. WALLACE, M.A., D.D. 



Registrar 

A. L. LANGFORD, M.A. 



Librarian 

A. E. LANG, M.A. 



The Arts Fa cult 

Offers to students all the advantages 
and Honours of the Univ'ersit^, and, 
in conjunction vJith me University 
Arts Faculty, makes full provision 
for all me courses leading to the 
degree of B.A. in the University. 



I The Divinity Faculty I 
i - 

\ \ 

Makes full provision for the course 
leading to the Degree of B.D., as 

! well as for the course required for ! 

| ordination to the ministry of the | 

Methodist Church in Canada. 



200 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



Royal 

College 

of 

Dental 

Surgeons 

of 

Ontario, 

Toronto 




The College 

Calendar, 

Giving 

Full 

Particulars, 

Will be 

Mailed 

Upon 

Request 



AFFILIATED vCitK the University of Toronto since 1888, it offers through its large and thoroughly 
/ \ efficient staff, up-to-date equipment and large clinic, opportunities for the study of Modern Dentistry) 
not excelled anywhere. QThe course is four academic years, leading to the Degree of Doctor of Dental 
Surgery from the University of Toronto, and Licentiate of Dental Surgery from the R. C. D. S. of Ontario. 

For further information address 

WALLACE SECCOMBE, D.D.S., Superintendent, Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario, 

240 College Street, Toronto 



v^ 



201 



: : 




grltffe (ftaUftj? 



TORONTO 



ONTARIO 



hi Federation with I'm onto University 

A RESIDENTIAL THEOLOGICAL 
COLLEGE OF THE CHURCH 
OF ENGLAND IN CANADA 



WYCLIFFE COLLEGE exists for the training of young 
men for the Christian Ministry of the Church of" 
England throughout Canada and the Foreign Mis- 
sionary Field. 

The Courses of Study in the College provide for instruction 
in Arts at the University ofToronto, with options at Wycliffe 
College, leading up to the Degrees of Bachelor of" Arts and 
Bachelor of Divinity. 

Wycliffe College is situated in the University grounds. Its 
students have full access to all privileges of the University 
library, gymnasium, athletic grounds, etc. 

For Calendar and information as to conditions of entrance, 
courses of" study, etc., apply to the Bursar and Registrar, 

MR. H. MORTIMER 
Wycliffe College, Toronto 
Telephone College 4380 

N. W. HOYLES, K.C., LL.D., President 
THE REV. CANON O'MEARA, LL.D., Principal 



>;:: 



::>; 



#ntario College 
of jJInirmarp 



♦ . i 1 1 1 r 1 1 

IIIHIHI 

Affiliated with the University of Toronto 
IllllllllllillllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllUlU 

Incorporated in 1871 




FACULTY: 
Chas. F. Heebner, Ph.G. (N.Y.), Phm.B. (Tor.) -Dean 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Pharmacy and Dispensing. 
Director of the Pharmaceutical and Dispensing Laboratories. 

Graham Chambers, B.A., M.D. (Tor.) 

Professor of Chemistry. Physics and Toxicology . 

Paul L. Scott, MB. (Tor.) 

Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

Geo. A. Evans, Phm.B. (Tor.) 

Professor of Analytical Chemistry. Director of Chemical Laboratory. 

R. O. Hurst, Phm.B. (Tor.) 

Lecturer in Materia Medica. 

(The work of Prof. Graham Chambers will he taken by Prof. George A 
Evans, Phm.B., during his absence on active service. I 

ACCEPTS students of Ontario, also students who are registered 
and have served a term of four years' apprenticeship in the 
other Provinces of the Dominion, or in Great Britain and 
the Colonies, and if they attend the two courses of lectures and 
pass the final examinations, they will be granted the diploma as a 
Pharmaceutical Chemist of the Province of Ontario. 

Full information in regard to entrance and fees is given in 
Curriculum, and same is mailed on application. 

. /// communications should be ad dressed to — 

W. B. GRAHAM, Registrar-Treasurer 
44 Gerrard Street Last, Toronto, Ont. 



•202 



Trinity College 

"Trinity)" is an Arts College in fhe University) of Horonto 
>: and a University) conferring Degrees in Divinity '■*'■ 




If you are proceeding to a Degree in Arts in the Univ'ersitp of 
Toronto, or to a Divinit^ Degree in me lini-Oersit^ of Trinity 
College, the privileges of Registration and Residence in "Trinity" 
are open to you. 

'The Women Students of Trinity College reside in St. Hilda's. 



1 ifttrtjarlB 

TORONTO - ONT. 
Federated with the University of Toronto 



R 






L5IDLNTIAL 
COLLEGE for 
CATHOLIC 
5TUDLNT5 :: 



Faculty of Arts makes full pro- 
vision for all courses leading 
to the Degree of B.A. in the 
University of Toronto. 

Academic Department prepares for 
Matriculation 



RLV. H. CARR, C.5.B. 
Superior 



>. 



203 



Ontario Veterinary College 

UNIVERSITY AVENUE, TORONTO 



Frontage - 134 feet 
Height - - 82 feet 




Cubic Feet - 9,000,000 
Floor Space - - 1 acre 



THE NEW BUILDING 



College Re-opens Tuesday, October 1st, 1918 



CALENDAR ON APPLICATION. 



For further particulars apply to E. A. A. GRANGE, V.S., M.Sc, Principal. 



7>: 



•_'04 



>',"■ 



Knox College 



TORONTO 



FEDERATED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



A Residential Theological College of 
the Presbyterian Church in Canada. 
./ Training School for Ministers, 
M i s s i o n a r i e s a n d Deacon-e s s e s 



1IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII 



lllllllllllllllllllllll 



COURSES of study and Class Lectures 
in every department of Biblical and 
Theological Learning lead to the 
Knox College Diploma and the Degree of 
Bachelor of Divinity. Students who are 
Graduates in Arts may take their B.D. work 
along with that of the required course. 
Knox provides a course in the English 
Bible, covering the Literature of the New 
Testament in four years and specially 
adapted to University students, who may- 
take the course for one, two, three or four 
years as a Religious Knowledge option. 

The magnificent new buildings on the 
University Campus are superior to those of 
any other Theological College in the British 
Empire. Accommodation in Residence for 
1 20 men. Students should make early- 
application for rooms. 



IIIHIMIIIMHIIIIIIM III MltlltlllllllllMIIMIIIIIIIIIIItMf III IIIIIMIMIIMIIIIMIIII MINIMI IIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIHMII III MUM III III II 

For Calendars a>"d any information desired, apply to the Principal. 
Knox College 

J. K. MACDONALD. Esq. Chairman of Board 
REV. ALFRED GANDIER. D.D.. L.L.D., Principal 



3 



arft Brothers 



Photographers 



328^ 

Yonge 

Street 

Toronto 
Telephone Main 1269 



•205 



National Trust Company 

Limited 

18-22 King Street East - Toronto 

MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, SASKATOON, REG1NA, EDMONTON 



Capital Paid-up 

Reserve - 

Assets under Administration 



$ 1,500,000 
$ 1,500,000 
$76,700,000 



President 
SIR JOSEPH FLAVELLE. BART. 

Vice-Presidents 
Z. A. LASH. K.C. E. R. WOOD W. E. RUNDLE 



Hon. Mr. Justice Britton 
George H. Watson. K.C 
Chester D. Massey 
Elias Rogers 
Alex. Bruce, K.C. 
H. C. Cox 
H. H. Fudger 



. . . Directors . . . 

H. B. Walker 

Hon. Sir Edward Kemp, K.C.M.C 

J. H. Plummer 

Hon. F. H. Phippen, K.C. 

H. J. Fuller 

F. W. Molson 

T. B. Macaulay 



W. M. Birks 

E. M. Saunders 

Sir John Aird 

J. W. Woods 

J. Harrington Walker 

Thomas Findley 



London, England, Representative 
A. L. NUNNS, 28 Bishopsgate, London, E.C. 



2(>6 




The Royal Military College of Canada 




& v'. J< ^xJZ j -d IlkRk art' few national institutions of more 
7jjf^jM^M(r' value and interest to the country than the 
Royal Military College of Canada. Notwith- 
standing this, its object and the work it is 
accomplishing are not sufficiently understood 
by the general public. 

The College is a Government institution, designed prim- 
arily for the purpose of giving instruction in all branches of 
military science to Cadets and Officers of the Canadian Militia. 
In fact it corresponds to Woolwich and Sandhurst. 

The Commandant and military instructors are all officers 
on the active list of the Imperial army, lent for the purpose, 
and there is in addition a complete staff of professors for the 
civil subjects which form such an important part of the College 
course. .Medical attendance is also provided. 

Whilst the College is organized on a strictly military basis 
the cadets receive a practical and scientific training in subjects 
essential to a sound modern education. 

The course includes a thorough grounding in Mathematics, 
Civil Engineering, Surveying, Physics, Chemistry, French and 
English. 

The strict discipline maintained at the College is one of 



the most valuable features of the course, and in addition, the 
constant practice of gymnastics, drills and outdoor exercises 
of all kinds, ensures health and excellent physical condition. 

Commissions in all branches of the Imperial Service and 
Canadian Permanent Force are offered annually. 

The diploma of graduation is considered by the authorities 
conducting the examination for Dominion Land Surveyor to 
be equivalent to a university degree, and by the regulations 
of the kaw Society of Ontario, it obtains the same exemptions 
as a P>..\. degree. 

The length of the course is three years, in three terms of 
9;J/2 months each. 

The total cost of the course, including board, uniform, 
instructional material, and all extras, is about $800. 

The annual competitive examination for admission to 
the College, takes place in May of each year, at the head- 
quarters of the several military districts. 

For full particulars regarding this examination and for 
any other information, application should be made to the Secre- 
tary of the Militia Council, < )ttawa, ( )nt., dr to the Command- 
ant, Royal Military College. Kingston. Ont. 



.*. . 



207 






Farmer Bros 



] LIMITED 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Art Print Importers 
Picture Frames 




492 Spadina Avenue 

l -ITORONTO I 1 

PHONE COLLEGE 2869 






":: 



minim: 



illinium 



i f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iii 

The Students' Photographer 



£ I" Studio is equipped 
^* with every facility 
necessary to produce 
the highest class of 
work in every branch 
of Professional Photo- 
graphy. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 
mum 

338 Yonge Street 

OPPOSITE GOULD STREET 

I 1 Telephone Main 6887 i I 

miiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiimimiiiiiiimmmm minium ii I 



£*: 



208 



&'£HHH 



CASAVANT 
ORGANS 



Are Superior * 

Tn Tone, Material 
and Workmanship. 



&z* 



Over 700 organs 
built by this firm 
in Canada, United 
States and South 
America. 




CASAVANT FRERES 

ST. HYACINTHE, P.Q. 



Branch Factory : 
SOUTH HAVEN, MICH. 



Toronto Representative : 
L. E. MOREL, 440 SPADINA AVE. 



The S. S. WHITE 

Dental Manufacturing Co. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Manufacturers of Dental Materials and 
Equipments of all kinds, such as : 

Porcelain Teeth 
Vulcanite Rubber 
Cements, Alloys 
Instruments 
Operating Chairs 
Electrical Engines 
Surgical and Dental Ap- 
paratus for Administering 
Anaesthetics 
Nitrous Oxide of Gas 
Oxygen 

Tooth Paste and Powders 
Toilet Preparations 



DISTRIBUTORS FOR CANADA 

S. S. WHITE COMPANY 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

489 COLLEGE STREET, TORONTO 



•209 




BACK of every sale made by us, 
> there is an honest desire on our 
■»■' part to make every buyer proud 
to possess any article bought from 
Ryrie Bros. You may call this conceit, 
we call it pride — business pride. We 
have it anyhow, call it what you will. 

TAKL WATCHES 
FOR IN5TANCL 

Our ladies' watches range from $6.50 
to $ 1 000.00. Watches for men, from 
$7.00 to $750.00, and we sell no 
watch that will not "do us proud." 

• • • • 

134-136-138 Yonge St. 
TORONTO 



JAMF5 RYRIL 
President 



W. M. BIRK5 
Vice-Pres. 



THE 



MERCHANTS' BANK 

OF CANADA 

HEAD OFFICE - - - MONTREAL 



vSik H. Montagu Allan President 
E. F. Hebden Managing Director 

I). C. Macarow - General Manager 

PAID-UP CAPITAL - $7,000,000 
RESERVE FUND - 7,421.292 

236 Branches in Canada 



UlllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllltlllllltllllllllllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllKIIINIIIII 

General Banking Business Transacted 



s 



AVINGS Departments at all Branches. 
Deposits of $1.00 and upwards received and 
interest allowed at best current rates. 

TORONTO OFFICES: 

13 Wellington Street West 

1400 Queen Street West (Parkdale) 

404-408 Parliament Street 

981 Dundas Street 

Cor. Dupont and Christie Streets 

New Toronto and Mimico 



i 



210 



m 



Official Calendar of the Department of Education 

For the Year 1918 



April: 
I. Easter Monday. 

Returns by Clerks of Counties, Cities, etc., of population, to Depart- 
ment, due. (On or he fori- 1st April). 

Boards and Inspectors to report to Department names of teachers, 
etc., for The Teachers* and Inspectors' Superannuation. (On 
April 1st). 

Annual Meeting of the Ontario Educational Association at Toronto. 
(During Easter Vacation). 
8. High and Continuation Schools, third term. Public and Separate 
Schools open after Easter Holidays. [Second Monday after Easier 
Sunday ). 
!). Normal and English-French Model Schools open after Easter Holi- 
days. 

15. Notice by candidates for Junior High School Entrance and Junior 
Public School Graduation Diploma examinations, to Inspectors, due 
(In 1 fore and on or before April \~>ih respectively). 

20. Inspectors report number of candidates for Junior High School 
Entrance and .Junior Public School Graduation Diploma examina- 
tions (not later than April 20th). 

.'{0. Inspectors report the names of the Presiding Officers for the 
Midsummer examinations. 

May: 

1. University of Toronto examinations iti Arts, Law, Pharmacy, Music 
and Agriculture begin. 

Notice by candidates to Inspectors due for Senior High School 
Entrance, Senior Public School Graduation Diploma and the Model 
School Entrance examinations and the Lower School examination 
for Entrance into the Normal Schools and Faculties of Education 
(on or l>c fore May 1st). 

-2. Inspectors report number of candidates for above examinations. 

3. Arbor Day. (First Friday in May). 



May. 
S. County Inspectors to notify the Minister of number of teachers in 
their inspectorates. (Not later limn May 8lh). 

15. Notice by candidates to inspectors due for the following examina- 
tions- The Middle School examination for Entrance into the Normal 
Schools, The L'pper School examination for Entrance into the 
Faculties of Education (on or he fori' May 15th). 

1(1. Inspectors report number of candidates for above examinations. 
(Not Idler I lion Mini Willi). 

21. Clerk of the Municipality to he notified by Separate School sup- 
porters of their withdrawal. (Before liii Wednesday in May). 
Normal School Final examination Group I begins. 

23. Empire Day. (1st School day before 2\lh May). 

24. Victoria Day (Friday). 

31. Assessors to settle basis of taxation in Union School Sections. 

(lie fore 1st June). 
.1 II lie : 
I. Collectors in Unorganized Townships to report to Sheriff uncollected 

rates for previous year. (On or before 1st June). 

Assessors in Unorganized Townships to return assessment roll. (Not 

later limn 1st June). 

Public and Separate School Boards and County Council to appoint 

representatives on the High School Entrance Boards of Examiners. 

(On or before 1st June). 

By-law to alter School boundaries or form Consolidated School 
Sections — last day of passing. (Not Inter limn 1st June). 
.'{. King's Birthday (Monday). 

I I. English-French Model Schools close. 
University Commencement. 

Senior High School Entrance and Senior Public School Graduation 
Diploma examinations, and the examination for Entrance into the 
Model Schools begin. The Lower School examination for Entrance 
into the Normal Schools and into the Faculties of Education begins. 
Junior Public School Graduation Diploma examination begins. 



211 



& ::::::::::::::: 



Parke.Davis&Co's 

PHARMACEUTICALS 



<i> 



Manufactured in Canada 
by Canadians 

Correspondence Solicited on 
all Pharmaco-Medical Subjects 



LABORATORY - WALKERVILLE, OflTARIO 



EASTERN DEPOT 
118 ST. PAUL ST. W., MONTREAL 



TORONTO OFFICE 
422 RYRIE BUILDING 



WINNIPEG OFFICE 
301 KEEWAYDEN BUILDING 



:::::::::::::::: ;;;:::::>; 



The 

Dental Company 

of Canada, Limited 




Oddfellows Temple Mew Birks Building 
229 College St Phillips'Square 

TOROMTO MONTREAL 



Booth Building 

Sparks Street 

OTTAWA 



DEALERS in EVERYTHING REQUIRED 
IN THE PRACTICE OF DENTISTRY 



E£& 



212 



Toronto Conservatory 
==== of Music =^= 

Sir Edmund Walker. C.V.O., LL.D., President. 
A. S. Vogt. Mus. Doc, Musical Director. 

The Most Splendidly Equipped School of Music in the Dominion. 

Unrivalled Facilities for the Thorough Training 
of Professional and Non-Professional Students. 

A well-appointed Residence for Young Women Students. 

Pupils May Enter at Any Time. 

Send for Year Book. Local Centre Syllabus and Women's Residence Pamphlet. 



Conservatory School of Expression 

Public Reading. Physical and Vocal Culture. 
Dramatic Art and Literature. 



SPECIAL CALENDAR. 



E. H. KIRKPATRICK, Ph.D., Principal. 



BUSINESS 

ESTABLISHED 

1842 




Harcourt & Son 

Official Robe Makers 

College Gowns, 
Hoods and Caps 



103 King Street West 

TORONTO 



Students Book Department 

I I UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO I I 



A complete line of Text Books in ARTS, 

MEDICINE, EDUCATION, FORESTRY 
and APPLIED SCIENCE. 



Graduates of the University may order 
any book they wish at STUDENTS' RATES 

R. J. HAMILTOM, B. A.. MANAGER 



V 

213 



University 

of Toronto 

Press 

TORONTO 



R. J. Hamilton, B.A., Manager 



nO L/C/ IS the orders of 
O Student Societies ft 



or 



PRINTING 

/invitations, Tickets, Pro- 
grammes, At -Homes, 
Cards, Etc.. 

/BINDING 



an 



IN ALL ITS BRANCHEvS 




Oiiirl 



The Temple-Pattison Go. 

LIMITED — 

Dental Supplies 
and Equipment 

243 COLLEGE ST, TORONTO, OnT. 

Branches— London Regina Edmonton 

Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 



COLES 



Caterer and 

Manufacturing 

Confectioner 

719 Yonge Street, Toronto 



-y. 



:>; 



Upper Canada Tract Society 
JBook Sbop 

Q Headquarters for Theological 

and Keligious Literature from 

all the leading English and 

American Publishers. 



UPPEK CANADA TRACT SOCIETY 

2 RICHMOND ST. EAST, TORONTO 



'214 



:\... 



Varsity Magazine Supplement 

FOURTH ET) IT ION 

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

THE STUDENTS ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

N order to complete, if possible, the work commenced 
and carried on in the previous Magazine Supplements 
to The Varsity, The Students Administrative Council 
have decided to continue the record of Varsity men on 
active service, in a fourth publication. 
A serious attempt has been made, in previous editions of The 
Varsity Magazine Supplement, to secure the photographs of every 
graduate and undergraduate of the University of Toronto on active 
service. The new Editorial Board will aim at securing the photo- 
graphs of all those who for any reason have been omitted. 

Information as to omissions or new enlistments should be addressed to the 
General Secretary, Students Administrative Council, University of Toronto. 




•215 



Central Ganada Loan and Savings 

Company 

26 King Street East, - TORONTO 

ASSETS - - - $9,137,000 
CAPITAL (Paid up) 1,750,000 
RESERVE FUND - 1,750,000 

DEPOSITS R- ece i v ed in sums of $1 .00 and upwards, and interest 
added thereon half-yearly. Special attention is 
culled to the fact that interest is allowed on the daily balance 

DEBENTURES Issue< * » n sums of $100 and upwards, payable 
in from one to five years, or upon sixty days' 
notice, and upon which special rates of interest are allowed depending 
on the term of investment. These Debentures are authorized as a 
Trustee Investment by Special Order in Council. 

Surplus for Depositors and Debenture Holders, $4,367,613.00 

E. R. WOOD. President 

G. A. MORROW Vice-President. H. C. COX. Vice-President. 

A. B. FISHER, Secretary. 



HERE is still a considerable 

number of copies of 'The 

Varsity Magazine Supplement," 

1916 edition, available, at 50 cents 

per copy. 

COLLIER C. GRANT, 

Business Manager, 
"The Varsity 1 " Office. 



Index to Advertisements 



University of Toronto and University College. . 198-9 

Victoria College 200 

School of Dentistry . 201 

Wycliffe College 202 

( )ntario College of I 'harmacy 202 

Trinity College 203 

St. Michael's G .liege 203 

( hitario Veterinary College 204 

Knox College 205 

Park Bros 205 

National Trust 20r> 

The Royal .Military College of Canada 207 

Farmer Bros., Limited 208 

Freeland 208 

Casavant Freres 209 

S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co 209 

Ryrie Bros., Limited 210 

The Merchants I Sank of Canada 210 

Department of Education, Toronto 211 

Parke, Davies & Co 212 

The Dental Co. of Canada 212 

Toronto Conservatory of Music 213 

Harcourt & Son 213 

Students" Book Dept 213 

University of Toronto Press 213 

The Temple-Pattison Co.. Limited 214 

Coles 214 

Upper Canada Tract Society 214 

Fourth Magazine Supplement 21? 

Central Canada Loan and Saving- Company... 216 



216